stormy


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storm·y

 (stôr′mē)
adj. storm·i·er, storm·i·est
1. Subject to, characterized by, or affected by storms; tempestuous.
2. Characterized by violent emotions, passions, speech, or actions: a stormy argument.

storm′i·ly adv.
storm′i·ness n.

stormy

(ˈstɔːmɪ)
adj, stormier or stormiest
1. (Physical Geography) characterized by storms
2. subject to, involving, or characterized by violent disturbance or emotional outburst
ˈstormily adv
ˈstorminess n

storm•y

(ˈstɔr mi)

adj. storm•i•er, storm•i•est.
1. indicative of or characterized by storms; tempestuous: stormy seas.
2. full of turmoil or strife.
[1150–1200]
storm′i•ly, adv.
storm′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stormy - (especially of weather) affected or characterized by storms or commotion; "a stormy day"; "wide and stormy seas"
inclement - (of weather or climate) severe
unpeaceful - not peaceful; "unpeaceful times"; "an unpeaceful marriage"
calm - (of weather) free from storm or wind; "calm seas"
2.stormy - characterized by violent emotions or behavior; "a stormy argument"; "a stormy marriage"
unpeaceful - not peaceful; "unpeaceful times"; "an unpeaceful marriage"

stormy

adjective
2. rough, wild, turbulent, tempestuous, raging the stormy waters that surround the British Isles
3. angry, heated, fierce, passionate, fiery, impassioned, tumultuous The letter was read at a stormy meeting.

stormy

adjective
1. Violently disturbed or agitated, as by storms:
2. Marked by unrest or disturbance:
Translations
عاصِفعاصِف، صاخِب، هائِج
bouřlivý
stormendestormfuld
myrskyinen
olujni
ofsafenginnstormasamur
嵐の
폭풍의
nevihten
stormig
ราวกับพายุ
bão táp

stormy

[ˈstɔːmɪ]
A. ADJ (stormier (compar) (stormiest (superl)))
1. (lit) [weather, night, skies] → tormentoso
it's stormyhay tormenta
2. (fig) (= turbulent) [meeting, scene] → tumultuoso, turbulento; [relationship] → tormentoso
B. CPD stormy petrel N (Orn) → petrel m de la tempestad (fig) → persona f pendenciera, persona f de vida borrascosa

stormy

[ˈstɔːrmi] adj
[weather, night, seas] → orageux/euse
[meeting, relationship] → orageux/euse

stormy

adj (+er) (lit, fig)stürmisch; discussion also, temperhitzig; protestsheftig; he has a stormy temperer ist jähzornig; stormy waters (fig)turbulente Zeiten pl

stormy

[ˈstɔːmɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (also) (fig) → burrascoso/a, tempestoso/a

storm

(stoːm) noun
1. a violent disturbance in the air causing wind, rain, thunder etc. a rainstorm; a thunderstorm; a storm at sea; The roof was damaged by the storm.
2. a violent outbreak of feeling etc. A storm of anger greeted his speech; a storm of applause.
verb
1. to shout very loudly and angrily. He stormed at her.
2. to move or stride in an angry manner. He stormed out of the room.
3. (of soldiers etc) to attack with great force, and capture (a building etc). They stormed the castle.
ˈstormy adjective
1. having a lot of strong wind, heavy rain etc. a stormy day; stormy weather; a stormy voyage.
2. full of anger or uncontrolled feeling. in a stormy mood; a stormy discussion.
ˈstormily adverb
ˈstorminess noun
ˈstormbound adjective
prevented by storms from continuing with a voyage, receiving regular supplies etc. stormbound ships.
ˈstormtrooper noun
a soldier specially trained for violent and dangerous attacks.
a storm in a teacup
a fuss made over an unimportant matter.
take by storm
to capture by means of a sudden violent attack. The invaders took the city by storm.

stormy

عاصِف bouřlivý stormende stürmisch θυελλώδης tempestuoso myrskyinen orageux olujni tempestoso 嵐の 폭풍의 stormachtig stormfull burzowy tempestuoso бурный stormig ราวกับพายุ fırtınalı bão táp 狂风暴雨的
References in classic literature ?
Act fifth opened with a stormy scene between Zara and Don Pedro.
On the evening before that stormy Thursday night when the Reverend Curtis Hartman sat in the bell tower of the church waiting to look at her body, young Willard had gone to visit the teacher and to borrow a book.
Months afterward Jim Burden arrived at my apartment one stormy winter afternoon, with a bulging legal portfolio sheltered under his fur overcoat.
Was it possible that, in spite of the stormy day, and worn out with the irksomeness within doors he had betaken himself to his customary haunt in the garden, and was now shivering under the cheerless shelter of the summer-house?
To have taken the field openly against his rival would have been madness; for he was not a man to be thwarted in his amours, any more than that stormy lover, Achilles.
And when he glanced upon the green walls of the watery defile in which the ship was then sailing, and bethought him that through that gate lay the route to his vengeance, and beheld, how that through that same gate he was now both chasing and being chased to his deadly end; and not only that, but a herd of remorseless wild pirates and inhuman atheistical devils were infernally cheering him on with their curses; --when all these conceits had passed through his brain, Ahab's brow was left gaunt and ribbed, like the black sand beach after some stormy tide has been gnawing it, without being able to drag the firm thing from its place.
It was like coming suddenly upon some wild sight of nature--a mountain forest lashed by a tempest, a ship tossed about upon a stormy sea.
It was a stormy, windy night, such as raises whole squadrons of nondescript noises in rickety old houses.
Finally, she resolved that she would endure the attentions of the rich lovers no longer; so one stormy night she escaped and went down the river and hid herself in the cave on the other side.
Well, it being away in the night and stormy, and all so mysterious-like, I felt just the way any other boy would a felt when I see that wreck laying there so mournful and lonesome in the middle of the river.
If it would only come a good black stormy night and I could get ashore.
All this meant one stormy night in her little room at Sunnybrook, but the clouds blew over, the sun shone again, a rainbow stretched across the sky, while "hope clad in April green" smiled into her upturned face and beckoned her on, saying:--