stoutness


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Related to stoutness: stoutly

stout

 (stout)
adj. stout·er, stout·est
1.
a. Bulky in figure; thickset or corpulent. See Synonyms at fat.
b. Strong in body; sturdy: added a stout defensive end to improve the front line.
c. Thick or strong in structure or substance; solid or substantial: "They met a stout barrier of old farm-carts upturned" (J.R.R. Tolkien).
2.
a. Having or marked by boldness or determination; resolute: stout of heart.
b. Stubborn or uncompromising: put up stout resistance to the proposal.
3. Having a strong flavor: a cup of stout coffee.
n.
1.
a. A thickset or corpulent person.
b. A garment size for a large or heavy figure.
2. A very dark ale or lager beer.

[Middle English, from Old French estout, of Germanic origin; see stel- in Indo-European roots.]

stout′ish adj.
stout′ly adv.
stout′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stoutness - the property of being strong and resolute
strength - the property of being physically or mentally strong; "fatigue sapped his strength"
2.stoutness - the property of excessive fatnessstoutness - the property of excessive fatness  
corpulency, fleshiness, obesity - more than average fatness
Translations

stoutness

[ˈstaʊtnɪs] Ngordura f, corpulencia f

stoutness

n
(= corpulence)Untersetztheit f, → Korpulenz f; (of woman)Fülligkeit f
(= sturdiness, of stick, horse) → Kräftigkeit f; (of door, rope, wall, gate)Stärke f; (of shoes)Festigkeit f
(= resoluteness, of heart) → Tapferkeit f; (of resistance also)Beherztheit f, → Mannhaftigkeit f (liter); (of refusal, denial)Entschiedenheit f; (of belief)Festigkeit f

stoutness

[ˈstaʊtnɪs] n (of person) → corpulenza; (of stick, shoes) → robustezza
References in classic literature ?
Marian alone, thanks to her bottle of liquor and her stoutness of build, stood the strain upon back and arms without suffering.
Gentlemen came; saw Julia at rehearsal; observed her stoutness and her wig; omitted to notice that her heart was in the right place; quailed at the prospect, apologized, and retired.
Don Quixote was standing by at the time, highly pleased to see his squire's stoutness, both offensive and defensive, and from that time forth he reckoned him a man of mettle, and in his heart resolved to dub him a knight on the first opportunity that presented itself, feeling sure that the order of chivalry would be fittingly bestowed upon him.
In spite of her exceptional stoutness, which caused her to protrude her chest and stomach and throw back her head, this woman (who was "Uncle's" housekeeper) trod very lightly.
How long he might have sat there to recover his breath is problematical, for he rose as rapidly as his stoutness would permit, spurred on by Michael's teeth already sunk into the fleshy part of his shoulder.
In the stoutness of his knight-errantry, he seemed to think the last-named protection all sufficient.
He was inclined to stoutness, but not unpardonably so; his hair was thin, but he was not aggressively bald; his face was dull, but certainly not stupid.
Opposite was the Duchess of Harley, a lady of admirable good-nature and good temper, much liked by every one who knew her, and of those ample architectural proportions that in women who are not duchesses are described by contemporary historians as stoutness.
Let him front the object of his worst apprehension, and his stoutness will commonly make his fear groundless.
They call him Hard-Heart, from the stoutness of his resolution; and well is he named, if all I have heard of his deeds be true.
In times of violence, every eminent person must fall in with many opportunities to approve his stoutness and worth; therefore every man's name that emerged at all from the mass in the feudal ages, rattles in our ear like a flourish of trumpets.
may have to abandon its war leverage due to the growing military stoutness of China.