strait


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Related to strait: Strait of Magellan, Bering Strait

strait

 (strāt)
n. often straits
1. A narrow channel joining two larger bodies of water: straits that were treacherous; the Strait of Gibraltar; the Bosporus Straits.
2. A position of difficulty, perplexity, distress, or need: in desperate straits.
adj. Archaic
1.
a. Difficult; stressful.
b. Having or marked by limited funds or resources.
2.
a. Narrow or confined.
b. Fitting tightly; constricted.
3. Strict, rigid, or righteous.

[Middle English streit, narrow, a strait, from Old French estreit, tight, narrow, from Latin strictus, past participle of stringere, to draw tight; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]

strait′ly adv.
strait′ness n.

strait

(streɪt)
n
1. (Physical Geography) (often plural)
a. a narrow channel of the sea linking two larger areas of sea
b. (capital as part of a name): the Strait of Gibraltar.
2. (often plural) a position of acute difficulty (often in the phrase in dire or desperate straits)
3. (Physical Geography) archaic a narrow place or passage
adj
4. (of spaces, etc) affording little room
5. (of circumstances, etc) limiting or difficult
6. severe, strict, or scrupulous
[C13: from Old French estreit narrow, from Latin strictus constricted, from stringere to bind tightly]
ˈstraitly adv
ˈstraitness n

strait

(streɪt)

n.
1. Often, straits. (used with a sing. v.) a narrow passage of water connecting two large bodies of water.
2. Often, straits. a position of difficulty, distress, or need.
3. Archaic. a narrow passage or area.
adj. Archaic.
5. narrow.
6. confined in area.
7. strict, as in requirements or principles.
[1150–1200; Middle English streit < Old French estreit < Latin strictus, past participle of stringere to bind; compare strain1]

strait

(strāt)
A narrow waterway joining two larger bodies of water. The Strait of Gibraltar, for example, connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Atlantic Ocean.

strait

A narrow strip of sea that links two larger areas of sea.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strait - a narrow channel of the sea joining two larger bodies of waterstrait - a narrow channel of the sea joining two larger bodies of water
channel - a deep and relatively narrow body of water (as in a river or a harbor or a strait linking two larger bodies) that allows the best passage for vessels; "the ship went aground in the channel"
narrow - a narrow strait connecting two bodies of water
2.strait - a bad or difficult situation or state of affairs
desperate straits, dire straits - a state of extreme distress
situation - a complex or critical or unusual difficulty; "the dangerous situation developed suddenly"; "that's quite a situation"; "no human situation is simple"
Adj.1.strait - narrow; "strait is the gate"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
narrow - not wide; "a narrow bridge"; "a narrow line across the page"

strait

noun
1. (often plural) channel, sound, narrows, stretch of water, sea passage Thousands of vessels pass through the straits annually.
plural noun
1. difficulty, crisis, mess, pass, hole (slang), emergency, distress, dilemma, embarrassment, plight, hardship, uphill (S. African), predicament, extremity, perplexity, panic stations (informal), pretty or fine kettle of fish (informal) If we had a child, we'd be in really dire straits.
Translations
صُعوبَه، حاجَه، عُسْر ماليمَضيق
průlivtíseňúžina
strædesundvanskelighed
tengerszoros
kröggursund
tramdomieji marškiniai
finansiālas grūtībasgrūtībasjūras šaurums

strait

[streɪt] N
1. (Geog) (also straits) → estrecho m
the Straits of Doverel estrecho de Dover
2. straits (fig) → situación f apurada, apuro m
to be in dire straitsestar en un gran apuro
the economic straits we are inel apuro económico en que nos encontramos

strait

[ˈstreɪt]
n (GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY)détroit m
straits npl
to be in dire straits → être aux abois, être dans une situation désespérée
to be in desperate financial straits → être financièrement aux abois

strait

n
(Geog) → Meerenge f, → Straße f; the straits of Dover/Gibraltardie Straße von Dover/Gibraltar
straits pl (fig)Nöte pl, → Schwierigkeiten pl; to be in dire or desperate straitsin großen Nöten sein, in einer ernsten Notlage sein

strait

:
straitjacket
n (lit, fig)Zwangsjacke f
strait-laced
adjprüde, puritanisch, spießig (inf)

strait

[streɪt] n (Geog) → stretto
the Straits of Dover → lo stretto di Dover
to be in dire straits (fig) → essere nei guai

strait

(streit) noun
1. (often in plural) a narrow strip of sea between two pieces of land. the straits of Gibraltar; the Bering Strait.
2. (in plural) difficulty; (financial) need.
ˈstrait-jacket noun
a type of jacket with long sleeves tied behind to hold back the arms of eg a violent and insane person.
ˌstrait-ˈlaced adjective
strict and severe in attitude and behaviour.
References in classic literature ?
Just now it's the fashion to be hideous, to make your head look like a scrubbing brush, wear a strait jacket, orange gloves, and clumping square-toed boots.
Alone in his canoe, he paddled off to a distant strait, which he knew the ship must pass through when she quitted the island.
It may be in a great strait, and not know what to do: I cannot help that.
I thought of the life that lay before me--YOUR life, sir--an existence more expansive and stirring than my own: as much more so as the depths of the sea to which the brook runs are than the shallows of its own strait channel.
The allusion served as a timely reminder to Darnay that this disagreeable companion had, of his own free will, assisted him in the strait of the day.
Seeing him, I felt that I was in a dangerous strait indeed, and I kept my eyes upon him.
Then strait commands that at the warlike sound Of Trumpets loud and Clarions be upreard His mighty Standard; that proud honour claim'd AZAZEL as his right, a Cherube tall: Who forthwith from the glittering Staff unfurld Th' Imperial Ensign, which full high advanc't Shon like a Meteor streaming to the Wind With Gemms and Golden lustre rich imblaz'd, Seraphic arms and Trophies: all the while Sonorous mettal blowing Martial sounds: At which the universal Host upsent A shout that tore Hells Concave, and beyond Frighted the Reign of CHAOS and old Night.
I trust well that a fool I mean, d'ye see me, sirs, a fool that is free of his guild and master of his craft, and can give as much relish and flavour to a cup of wine as ever a flitch of bacon can I say, brethren, such a fool shall never want a wise clerk to pray for or fight for him at a strait, while I can say a mass or flourish a partisan.
We landed at a small port-town called Xamoschi, situated on the south-east part of Japan; the town lies on the western point, where there is a narrow strait leading northward into along arm of the sea, upon the north-west part of which, Yedo, the metropolis, stands.
This strait she easily crossed, for the shoes kept her up.
In this strait it occurred to me that these people, however barbarous, have some oath which they keep with an inviolable strictness; the best precaution, therefore, that I could use would be to bind them by this oath to be true to their engagements.
But, this accomplished, which he fancied was all he had to do to get out of this terrible strait and embarrassment, another still greater difficulty presented itself, for it seemed to him impossible to relieve himself without making some noise, and he ground his teeth and squeezed his shoulders together, holding his breath as much as he could; but in spite of his precautions he was unlucky enough after all to make a little noise, very different from that which was causing him so much fear.