stramonium


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stra·mo·ni·um

 (strə-mō′nē-əm)
n.
1. The jimsonweed.
2. The dried poisonous leaves of this plant, formerly used for medicinal purposes.

[New Latin, probably ultimately from Old Catalan estremoni, datura, perhaps (in reference to its hallucinogenic properties) from Old Catalan estremonia, astrology, magic (from alteration of Latin astronomia, astronomy; see astronomy), or perhaps from alteration of Latin strūmus, nightshade (from strūma, scrofulous tumor (for which nightshade was used as a cure)), or perhaps from a source akin to Czech and Russian durman, datura (probably of Tatar origin; akin to Turkish derman, medicine, from Persian darmān, from Middle Persian, from Old Iranian *darmān-, that which contains firmness or sustenance; akin to Sanskrit dharmaḥ, statute, law; see dharma).]

stramonium

(strəˈməʊnɪəm) or

stramony

n
1. (Pharmacology) a preparation of the dried leaves and flowers of the thorn apple, containing hyoscyamine and formerly used as a drug to treat asthma
2. (Plants) another name for thorn apple1
[C17: from New Latin, of uncertain origin]

stra•mo•ni•um

(strəˈmoʊ ni əm)

n.
2. the dried leaves of the jimsonweed, formerly used in medicine as an antispasmodic.
[1655–65; < New Latin; of uncertain orig.]
References in classic literature ?
The asthmatic had bitten off either end of the stramonium cigarette, and was soon choking himself with the crude fumes, which he inhaled in desperate gulps, to exhale in furious fits of coughing.
DAVID MARSDEN AIT'S a thorn apple, Datura stramonium, and every bit of it is poisonous.
CAROL: It's a thorn apple, Datura stramonium, and every bit of it is poisonous.
Tenders are invited for Supply of Phosphoric Sabal serrulata Sabina, Senega, Sarsaparilla , Secale cornutum, Selenium, Senecio aureus, Sepia, Silicea,Staphysagria,Sticta pulmonaria, Stramonium,Sabadilla,Sulphur,Sulphuric acid, Syphilinum, Syzygium jambolanum, Tabacum, Tarentula cubensis,
Remedies: Aconite, Arnica, Belladonna, Cactina, Calendula, Camphora, Chocolate, Coffeinum, Croton Tiglium, Digitoxin, Elaterium, Ergotaminum, Hydrogen, Hypericum, Lithium, Melilotus, Morphinum, Oenanthus, Stramonium, Strychninum, Veratrum.
Shyma et al (114) reported significant anti-tick activity of the crude methanolic extracts of leaves of Datura stramonium, Azardirachta indica and seeds of Allium sativum and Carica papaya.
We were very interested to read the article by Kelly Melvin and David Hourani in the January/February 2014 issue of the West Virginia Medical Journal regarding a case of Datura stramonium ingestion being misdiagnosed as cathinone intoxication.
theophrasti, Datura stramonium, Erodium cicuratium, Malva neglecta and Vicia tetrasperma at 37[degrees]C (Westerman et al.
Don) Soo Tubers used in backache Daphne mucronata Royle Roots purgative, bark and leaves used cutaneously Datura stramonium Linn.
In 1805, Seishu Hanaoka, a Japanese surgeon, administered a potent oral mixture of alkaloids, largely from the Datura stramonium plant, to a woman for a mastectomy (4).
and "Atsefaris", Datura stramonium were recorded in the pots and experimental fields.