strangling


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stran·gle

 (străng′gəl)
v. stran·gled, stran·gling, stran·gles
v.tr.
1.
a. To kill by squeezing the throat so as to choke or suffocate; throttle.
b. To cut off the oxygen supply of; smother.
2. To suppress, repress, or stifle: strangle a scream.
3. To inhibit the growth or action of; restrict: "That artist is strangled who is forced to deal with human beings solely in social terms" (James Baldwin).
v.intr.
1. To become strangled.
2. To die from suffocation or strangulation; choke.

[Middle English stranglen, from Old French estrangler, from Latin strangulāre, from Greek strangalan, from strangalē, halter.]

stran′gler n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strangling - the act of suffocating (someone) by constricting the windpipestrangling - the act of suffocating (someone) by constricting the windpipe; "no evidence that the choking was done by the accused"
suffocation, asphyxiation - killing by depriving of oxygen
Translations

strangling

[ˈstræŋglɪŋ] Nestrangulación f, estrangulamiento m

strangling

n
(= murder)Mord mdurch Erwürgen
(= act of strangling)Erwürgen nt, → Erdrosseln nt; (fig)Ersticken nt

strangling

[ˈstræŋglɪŋ] nstrangolamento
References in classic literature ?
The strangling hero sprang up with a relieving snort.
All on a sudden some night it will come wailing in the wind outside your window, and you must blacken your heart and harden your face with another strangling grip of its slim appealing throat, another blow upon its angel eyes.
As it was, he was already thirty yards behind us and on the verge of strangling when we reached the brow of the slope.
I have mentioned it only to explain why, on arriving with the Vicomte de Chagny in the cellars of the Opera, I was bound to protect my companion against the ever-threatening danger of death by strangling.
But for all the hurry of his coming, these were not the dews of exertion that he wiped away, but the moisture of some strangling anguish; for his face was white and his voice, when he spoke, harsh and broken.
Now slow The plectrum led to prayer the cloistered chords, Now loudly with the crash of falling rain, Now soft as the leaf whispering of words, Now loud and soft together as the long Patter of pearls and seed-pearls on a dish Of marble; liquid now as from the bush Warbles the mango bird; meandering Now as the streamlet seawards; voiceless now As the wild torrent in the strangling arms Of her ice-lover, lying motionless, Lulled in a passion far too deep for sound.
Somewhere behind a screen a clock began wheezing, as though oppressed by something, as though someone were strangling it.
Every one marvelled at the way in which these things had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, and strangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.
The two half-breed hunters were now eager to repeat the manoeuvre of the noose; promising to entrap Bruin, and have rare sport in strangling and drowning him.
To see some of their faces you'd have thought they were afraid I'd go about at night strangling people.
Wolfert heard the plunge, and a kind of strangling, bubbling murmur, but the darkness of the night hid everything from him, and the swiftness of the current swept everything instantly out of hearing.
Once or twice it made wry faces at swallowing a mouthful of water, and choked a spluttered as if on the point of strangling.