strappado


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strap·pa·do

 (stră-pā′dō, -pä′-)
n. pl. strap·pa·does
1. A form of torture in which the victim is lifted off the ground by a rope attached to the wrists, which have been tied behind the back, and then is dropped partway to the ground with a jerk.
2. The apparatus employed in this method of torture.

[Alteration of French strapade, from Old French, from Old Italian strappata, from strappare, to stretch tight, of Germanic origin.]

strappado

(strəˈpeɪdəʊ; -ˈpɑː-)
n, pl -does
(Historical Terms) a system of torture in which a victim was hoisted by a rope tied to his wrists and then allowed to drop until his fall was suddenly checked by the rope
[C16: from French strapade, from Italian strappare to tug sharply, probably of Germanic origin; related to German (dialect) strapfen to make taut]

strap•pa•do

(strəˈpeɪ doʊ, -ˈpɑ-)

n., pl. -does.
1. an old form of punishment or torture in which the victim was hoisted by a rope around the wrists, dropped, and allowed to fall the length of the rope.
2. the instrument used for this purpose.
[1550–60; alter. of Middle French strapade or its source, Italian strappata a sharp pull or tug]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strappado - a form of torture in which the hands are tied behind a person's back and they are lifted off the ground by a rope tied to their wrists, then allowed to drop until their fall is checked with a jerk by the rope
torturing, torture - the deliberate, systematic, or wanton infliction of physical or mental suffering by one or more persons in an attempt to force another person to yield information or to make a confession or for any other reason; "it required unnatural torturing to extract a confession"
References in classic literature ?
The wheel, the gibbet, the strappado, kept good guard around the place of refuge, and lay in watch incessantly for their prey, like sharks around a vessel.
Abu Sharar was also threatened with the imposition of sanctions against her, including travel ban and the usage of strappado torture; where a person gets hung for hours from the wrists.
Richard Hosley offers several possibilities for flying at the Globe, (60), but as both Gabriel Egan and John Orrell point out, none of them seems likely; (61): simulations of strappado and of hanging both require a fixed point on the stage facade with a hook from which the length of rope for the harness can be accurately measured (otherwise the actor is likely to suffer the torments for real); while the old chestnut about the "lifeless" body of Antony needing mechanical assistance to get him into the Monument ignores the probability that Burbage would have surreptitiously aided his own ascent.