strategic air warfare


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strategic air warfare

Air combat and supporting operations designed to effect, through the systematic application of force to a selected series of vital targets, the progressive destruction and disintegration of the enemy's war-making capacity to a point where the enemy no longer retains the ability or the will to wage war. Vital targets may include key manufacturing systems, sources of raw material, critical material, stockpiles, power systems, transportation systems, communication facilities, concentration of uncommitted elements of enemy armed forces, key agricultural areas, and other such target systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Cold War hostilities increased, American war planning adopted strategic air warfare as a primary component.
This is a history of Allied strategic air warfare against Japan during World War II.
With war surrounding them and the nation on the precipice of war, these four air planners developed this plan to create an essentially independent service that would wage strategic air warfare, fight a tactical fight, resupply on a global scale, and help win a world war.
1) The objective of course was to disrupt the enemy's war-making capacity, but what is remarkable is how ill-informed the air generals in charge of strategic air warfare were with regard to what the enemy's war-making capacity consisted of and where it was to be found.
He grounds them solidly in the Cold War era, explaining how Warden turned against the prevailing model of AirLand Battle, which he saw as land-centric and dominated by concerns for Close Air Support and other tactical uses of air power, and how Warden turned to ideas of strategic air warfare that had once been at the very root of arguments for an independent air force.
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