stratigraphy

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stra·tig·ra·phy

 (strə-tĭg′rə-fē)
n.
The study of rock strata, especially the distribution, deposition, and age of sedimentary rocks.

strat′i·graph′ic (străt′ĭ-grăf′ĭk), strat′i·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
strat′i·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

stratigraphy

(strəˈtɪɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Geological Science) the study of the composition, relative positions, etc, of rock strata in order to determine their geological history
2. (Archaeology) archaeol a vertical section through the earth showing the relative positions of the human artefacts and therefore the chronology of successive levels of occupation
Abbreviation: stratig
stratigrapher, stratigraphist n
stratigraphic, ˌstratiˈgraphical adj

stra•tig•ra•phy

(strəˈtɪg rə fi)

n.
a branch of geology dealing with the classification, nomenclature, correlation, and interpretation of stratified rocks.
[1860–65]
stra•tig′ra•pher, n.
strat•i•graph•ic (ˌstræt ɪˈgræf ɪk) adj.
strat`i•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

stratigraphy

the branch of geology that studies the classification, correlation, and interpretation of stratified rocks. — stratigrapher, n.stratigraphic, stratigraphical, adj.
See also: Geology

stratigraphy

1. The study of the composition and relative positions of rock strata.
2. A section cut vertically in the ground and used, by examining the different layers, to determine the chronology of human artifacts or settlement remains that are found buried.
3. The study of stratified (layered) rocks.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stratigraphy - the branch of geology that studies the arrangement and succession of strata
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
Translations
References in classic literature ?
It is singular that this prompt mode of conveying valuable, but easily transportable effects beyond the reach of a hostile ship should not have suggested itself while the property belonged to Mr.
Boythorn, "the treatment of surgeons aboard ship is such that I would submit the legs--both legs--of every member of the Admiralty Board to a compound fracture and render it a transportable offence in any qualified practitioner to set them if the system were not wholly changed in eight and forty hours
At nine o'clock, Polly packed his bag with clean clothes, nicely mended, such remnants of the festive tea as were transportable, and kissed him "good-night," with many injunctions to muffle up his throat going over the bridge, and be sure that his feet were dry and warm when he went to bed.
According to the data obtained, the stratigraphical ranges of S.
However, the diversity dynamics and the stratigraphical distribution of this group in the Ibero-Levantine Sector of the Iberian Range require more accurate analysis due to the patchy distribution of the outcrops.
For this purpose 2 D seismic lines have been interpreted to get stratigraphical and structural information of subsurface.
Poster display at American Association of Stratigraphical Palynology 17th Annual Meeting, Arlington, Virginia
The first one is a completely unreleased archaeological sequence, while the second one is a well-known rock art site with an associated stratigraphical sequence.
Schmidt on textual "contamination") and Chaucer (Orietta Da Rold on stratigraphical analysis of early Chaucerian manuscripts), take their place with other discussions of the editing process rather than being allowed to dominate.
The evidence is stratigraphical (including pottery) at Arlingham (Allen 2001) in the inner estuary, and morphostratigraphical in the middle estuary at Littleton (NGR ST 582907) and Woolaston (NGR ST 591981); at Littleton and Woolaston, a faint feature a few centimetres high and a subtle vegetation change separate two high marsh-terraces, each of which overlies pale brown silts below thin grey silts.
Norman Newell and notably Derek Ager, in his classic The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (1973, 1981), had provocatively urged that paleontologists needed to go back to their roots and realize the empirical reality of mass extinction.