stria

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Related to striae: striae atrophicae, Striae Distensae

stri·a

 (strī′ə)
n. pl. stri·ae (strī′ē)
1. A thin, narrow groove or channel.
2. A thin line or band, especially one of several that are parallel or close together: a characteristic stria of contractile tissue.

[Latin; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]

stria

(ˈstraɪə)
n (often plural) , pl striae (ˈstraɪiː)
1. (Geological Science) geology Also called: striation any of the parallel scratches or grooves on the surface of a rock caused by abrasion resulting from the passage of a glacier, motion on a fault surface, etc
2. (Geological Science) fine ridges and grooves on the surface of a crystal caused by irregular growth
3. (Biology) biology anatomy a narrow band of colour or a ridge, groove, or similar linear mark, usually occurring in a parallel series
4. (Anatomy) biology anatomy a narrow band of colour or a ridge, groove, or similar linear mark, usually occurring in a parallel series
5. (Architecture) architect a narrow channel, such as a flute on the shaft of a column
[C16: from Latin: a groove]

stri•a

(ˈstraɪ ə)

n., pl. stri•ae (ˈstraɪ i)
1. a slight or narrow furrow, ridge, stripe, or streak, esp. one of a number in parallel arrangement: striae of muscle fiber.
2. any of a series of parallel lines on glaciated rock surfaces or the faces of crystals.
[1555–65; < Latin: furrow, channel]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stria - any of a number of tiny parallel grooves such as: the scratches left by a glacier on rocks or the streaks or ridges in muscle tissue
groove, channel - a long narrow furrow cut either by a natural process (such as erosion) or by a tool (as e.g. a groove in a phonograph record)
2.stria - a stripe or stripes of contrasting colorstria - a stripe or stripes of contrasting color; "chromosomes exhibit characteristic bands"; "the black and yellow banding of bees and wasps"
collar - (zoology) an encircling band or marking around the neck of any animal
stretch mark - a narrow band resulting from tension on the skin (as on abdominal skin after pregnancy)
streak, stripe, bar - a narrow marking of a different color or texture from the background; "a green toad with small black stripes or bars"; "may the Stars and Stripes forever wave"
Translations

stri·a

n. lista, fibra.

stria

n (pl -ae) estría
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment of Striae with a 755 nm Picosecond laser with Specialized Lens Array," Robert Weiss, Margaret Weiss
Associated findings on slit lamp examination include distortion of retinal vessels, retinal striae, retinal haemorrhages, exudates, and macular oedema.
The Blue Glass filters are of a high internal quality, resulting from an extremely low-volume striae level and an extremely low bubble and inclusion level.
technology has received CE Mark indication for the effective treatment of striae (stretch marks) and acne scars.
Pectoral fin without spine bearing i,14 (2, including holotype) or i,15 rays (4), enlarged, distal margin broadly rounded, reaching or slightly in front of pectoral fin origin, its first ray broadened and non-ossified, ventrally ornamented with regular striae.
Defensive lung Qi usually protects the body from exterior pathogenic factors but if that is weakened, the resultant loosening of striae and interstice make it easier for exterior pathogenic factors to invade.
For example, operculum striae (concentric ringlike chitin deposits) have been used to age and estimate growth in large, commercially harvested marine snails from northern Japan (Ilano et al.
Physical examination showed facial plethora, prominent supraclavicular fat pads, wide abdominal purple striae, and multiple bruises in the lower extremities.
McDermott said that "by far" the most discriminatory clinical features of endogenous Cushing's syndrome are easy bruising, violaceous striae on the trunk, facial plethora, and proximal muscle weakness.
Typical cushinoid features such as moon face, centripetal obesity, buffalo hump, and violaceous striae were strikingly absent.
2) Lesions that do not have Wickham's striae may need a biopsy for confirmation of the diagnosis.