stride piano

(redirected from stride pianist)

stride piano

n.
A style of jazz piano playing in which the right hand plays the melody and the left hand alternates between the bass notes on the strong beats and chords on the weak ones.

[From stride bass (from the motions of the left hand).]

stride pianist n.
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We learn that the subject was blessed with a stride pianist father who gave him his first lessons before Bud was five years old, and then took him to other teachers, all of whom trained the youngster thoroughly in the classics, not just jazz.
Waller, a stride pianist whose music will be highlighted in a concert dubbed "Unsaturated Fats" at 8 p.
5) Exemplary here is the way that the great stride pianist James P.
Eight compositions by stride pianist Wille "The Lion" Smith.
Some of the performers on Saturday include Frank Foster's Widespread Depression Big Band, the Frank Wess Quintet, the Kenny Davern Quartet, Ed Polcer Septet, BED with Becky Kilgore, Eddie Erickson and Dan Barrett, the Eric Comstock Trio and stride pianist John Sheridan.
There has never been any shortage of CDs compiling the great Depression-era showman and stride pianist, and no single-disc set can claim to be definitive.
The best of the trio is ``Satch Plays Fats'' (Four stars), featuring Armstrong and his incomparable All-Stars playing the music of stride pianist Fats Waller.
The early evening has Missouri-born stride pianist Ralph Sutton alone at the keys, competing against the London Community Gospel Choir for tickets sales.
The Pointers - Ruth, Anita and June - are traveling the country in a lively revival of the 1978 musical revue ``Ain't Misbehavin' '' - a tribute to African-American life as captured in the music of legendary stride pianist and singer Thomas ``Fats'' Waller.
A rowdy collection of songs written or recorded by legendary stride pianist and vocalist Thomas ``Fats'' Waller, the show set feet tapping and heads bopping in New York in 1978, later doing the same in Los Angeles.
The debt he owed to the stride pianists who came before is clearly evident, as is the constant investigation of new cadences and hitherto undiscovered nooks and crannies in what we all thought were overly familiar and sometimes even trite tunes is nothing short of genius.