strike out


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strike

 (strīk)
v. struck (strŭk), struck or strick·en (strĭk′ən), strik·ing, strikes
v.tr.
1.
a. To hit sharply, as with a hand, fist, weapon, or implement: struck the table in anger; strikes the ball with a nine iron; struck the nail with a hammer.
b. To inflict (a blow).
2. To penetrate or pierce: was struck in the leg by a bullet.
3.
a. To collide with or crash into: She struck the desk with her knee.
b. To cause to come into violent or forceful contact: She struck her knee against the desk.
c. To thrust (a weapon, for example) in or into someone or something: struck the sword into the dragon.
d. To damage or destroy, as by forceful contact: Lightning struck the tree.
4. To make a military attack on; assault.
5. To afflict suddenly, as with a disease or impairment: was stricken with cancer.
6. To cause to become suddenly in a certain way: struck him dead.
7.
a. To snap at or seize (a bait).
b. To hook (a fish that has taken the bait) by a pull on the line.
8. To wound by biting. Used especially of a snake.
9. To form by stamping, printing, or punching: strike a medallion.
10. To produce or play by manipulating strings or keys: strike a B flat; strike w, t, and y on the keyboard.
11. To indicate by a percussive or chiming sound: The clock struck nine.
12. To produce as if by playing a musical instrument: The report struck a positive note in the final paragraph.
13.
a. To produce by friction or a blow: struck fire from the flints.
b. To produce flame, light, or a spark by friction: strike a match.
14. To remove or separate suddenly, as with a blow: struck the wasp from his shoulder; struck off the diseased branch with a machete.
15. To eliminate or expunge: strike a trial witness's answer to a question as inadmissible hearsay.
16.
a. To come upon (a mineral deposit) by effort; discover: struck gold.
b. To come to; reach or attain: finally struck the main trail.
17.
a. To fall upon; shine on: A bright light struck her face.
b. To become audible to: An odd sound struck his ear.
18. To affect keenly or forcibly; impress: The suggestion struck her as foolish.
19. To enter the mind of: The thought struck me from out of the blue.
20.
a. To cause (a strong emotion) to penetrate deeply: struck terror into their hearts.
b. To affect or overcome with strong emotion: She was struck with alarm at the news.
21.
a. To make and confirm the terms of (a bargain).
b. To achieve (a balance, for example) by careful consideration.
22. To position one's body in (a pose, for example); assume.
23. Nautical
a. To haul down (a mast or sail).
b. To lower (a flag or sail) in salute or surrender.
c. To lower (cargo) into a hold.
24. To remove (theatrical properties, a set, or technical equipment) from a stage.
25. To dismantle and pack up for departure: strike camp.
26. To undertake a strike against (an employer).
27.
a. To level or even (a measure, as of grain).
b. To smooth or shape with a strickle.
28.
a. To send (plant roots) out or down.
b. To cause (a plant cutting) to take root.
v.intr.
1. To deal a blow or blows, as with the fist or a weapon; hit.
2. To aim a stroke or blow: struck at his opponent but missed.
3. To make contact suddenly or violently; collide: A car and a bus struck at the intersection.
4. To begin a military attack: The enemy struck unexpectedly.
5. Sports To score a goal: The home team struck early in the game.
6. To penetrate or pierce: The cold struck right through our jackets.
7. To take bait: The fish are striking.
8. To dart or shoot suddenly forward in an attempt to inflict a bite or wound. Used of snakes and wild animals.
9. To set out or proceed, especially in a new direction: struck off into the forest.
10. To begin to move: The horse struck into a gallop.
11.
a. To send out roots.
b. To sprout.
12.
a. To indicate the time by making a percussive or chiming sound: The clock struck just as we left.
b. To become indicated by a percussive or chiming sound: The hour has struck.
13. To become ignited.
14. To discover something suddenly or unexpectedly: struck on a new approach.
15. To fall, as light or sound: sunlight striking on the cliffs; a din struck upon their ears.
16. To have an effect; make an impression.
17. To engage in a strike against an employer.
18. To interrupt by pushing oneself forward: struck rudely into the conversation.
19. To strive diligently for a specific technical rating in the US Navy.
n.
1. An act or gesture of striking.
2. An attack, especially a military air attack on a single group of targets.
3. Sports A scoring attempt, often resulting in a goal.
4.
a. A cessation of work by employees in support of demands made on their employer, as for higher pay or improved conditions.
b. A temporary stoppage of normal activity undertaken as a protest.
5. A sudden achievement or valuable discovery, as of a precious mineral.
6.
a. The taking of bait by a fish.
b. A pull on a fishing line indicating this.
7. A quantity of coins or medals struck at the same time.
8.
a. Baseball A pitched ball that is counted against the batter, typically one that is swung at and missed, fouled off, or judged to have passed through the strike zone.
b. A perfectly thrown ball: The quarterback threw a strike to the receiver.
9. An unfavorable condition, circumstance, or characteristic; a disadvantage: "[They] were trying to sell a movie with several strikes against it as a mass-audience 'property'" (John Sayles).
10. Sports The knocking down of all the pins in bowling with the first bowl of a frame.
11. The taking root and growing of a plant cutting.
12. Geology The course or bearing of a structural surface, such as an inclined bed, as it intersects a horizontal plane.
13. The removal of all properties, sets, and technical equipment following a final performance, as of a play or concert.
14. A strickle.
Phrasal Verbs:
strike down
1. To cause to fall by a blow.
2. To incapacitate or kill: He was struck down by tuberculosis.
3. To invalidate: The court struck down the law as unconstitutional.
strike out
1. To begin a course of action.
2. To set out energetically.
3. Baseball
a. To pitch three strikes to (a batter), putting the batter out.
b. To be struck out.
4. To fail in an endeavor.
strike up
1.
a. To start to play music or sing: The band suddenly struck up.
b. To start to play or sing (something): The orchestra struck up a waltz.
c. To cause to start to play or sing: Strike up the band!
2. To initiate or begin: strike up a conversation.
Idioms:
on strike
Engaged in a work stoppage: Most of the employees were on strike.
strike hands
To conclude a bargain or reach an agreement.
strike it rich Informal
To have sudden financial success.

[Middle English striken, from Old English strīcan, to stroke; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]
Our Living Language The central role that baseball has played in American culture is known to all, but is particularly evident in the abundance of baseball expressions applied to circumstances outside the sport. When people say that they have struck out in an endeavor, they are using one such expression. We routinely speak of ballpark figures or estimates, of some unexpected quirk of fate or tricky question on an exam being a curve ball, of minor-league or bush-league players in a field or business, who might one day enter the big leagues. If we can't go to lunch with a person who invites us, we take a rain check. We can go to bat or pinch-hit for a friend. We can be off base about something or so disconnected we are out in left field. When we cooperate we are playing ball, and when we get serious or even ruthless about something, we are playing hardball. Some unfortunate people are said to have been born with two strikes against them if bad things come their way right off the bat. The list could go on and on, but that would only be running up the score.

strike out

vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to remove or erase
2. (intr) to start out or begin: to strike out on one's own.
3. (Baseball) baseball to put out or be put out on strikes
4. (intr) informal US and Canadian to fail utterly

strike out

Three strikes on the batter, which is an out.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.strike out - remove from a list; "Cross the name of the dead person off the list"
take away, take out - take out or remove; "take out the chicken after adding the vegetables"
2.strike out - put out or be put out by a strikeout; "Oral struck out three batters to close the inning"
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
fan - strike out (a batter), (of a pitcher)
whiff - strike out by swinging and missing the pitch charged as the third
fail, neglect - fail to do something; leave something undone; "She failed to notice that her child was no longer in his crib"; "The secretary failed to call the customer and the company lost the account"
3.strike out - be unsuccessful in an endeavor; "The candidate struck out with his health care plan"
go wrong, miscarry, fail - be unsuccessful; "Where do today's public schools fail?"; "The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably"
4.strike out - make a motion as with one's fist or foot towards an object or away from one's body
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
kick - thrash about or strike out with the feet
5.strike out - cause to get out; "The pitcher retired three batters"; "the runner was put out at third base"
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
6.strike out - set out on a course of action; "He struck out on his own"
begin, commence, set out, start, start out, set about, get down, get - take the first step or steps in carrying out an action; "We began working at dawn"; "Who will start?"; "Get working as soon as the sun rises!"; "The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia"; "He began early in the day"; "Let's get down to work now"

strike

verb
1. To deliver a powerful blow to suddenly and sharply:
Informal: biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: belt, conk, paste.
Idioms: let someone have it, sock it to someone.
2. To set upon with violent force:
3. To bring great harm or suffering to:
4. To grasp at (something) eagerly, forcibly, and abruptly with the jaws:
5. To give forth or cause to give forth a clear, resonant sound:
6. To remove or invalidate by or as if by running a line through or wiping clean.Also used with out:
annul, blot (out), cancel, cross (off or out), delete, efface, erase, expunge, obliterate, rub (out), scratch (out), undo, wipe (out), x (out).
Law: vacate.
7. To evoke a usually strong mental or emotional response from:
8. To enter a person's mind:
9. To have a sudden overwhelming effect on:
10. To cease working in support of demands made upon an employer:
Idiom: go on strike.
phrasal verb
strike back
To return like for like, especially to return an unfriendly or hostile action with a similar one:
phrasal verb
strike down
To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow:
Slang: deck.
Idiom: lay low.
phrasal verb
strike out
To proceed in a specified direction:
noun
2. Something that has been discovered:
Translations
يَحْذِف، يَمْحويُسَدِّدُ الضَّربات
škrtatútočit
lange udstryge
bunyózni kezd
stofna til slagsmálastrika út
kavgaya başlamaküstünü silmek

w>strike out

vi
(= hit out)schlagen; to strike out wildly or blindlywild um sich schlagen; to strike out at somebody (lit, fig)jdn angreifen
(= change direction)zuhalten (→ for, towards auf +acc); (= set out)sich aufmachen, losziehen (inf)(for zu); to strike out for homesich auf den Heimweg machen; to strike out on one’s own (lit)allein losziehen; (fig)eigene Wege gehen; to strike out in a new direction (fig)neue Wege gehen
(Baseball) → „aus“ sein; (US fig inf) → nicht durchkommen
vt sep(aus)streichen; to strike something out of the recordetw aus dem Protokoll streichen

strike

(straik) past tense struck (strak) : past participles struck ~stricken (ˈstrikən) verb
1. to hit, knock or give a blow to. He struck me in the face with his fist; Why did you strike him?; The stone struck me a blow on the side of the head; His head struck the table as he fell; The tower of the church was struck by lightning.
2. to attack. The enemy troops struck at dawn; We must prevent the disease striking again.
3. to produce (sparks or a flame) by rubbing. He struck a match/light; He struck sparks from the stone with his knife.
4. (of workers) to stop work as a protest, or in order to force employers to give better pay. The men decided to strike for higher wages.
5. to discover or find. After months of prospecting they finally struck gold/oil; If we walk in this direction we may strike the right path.
6. to (make something) sound. He struck a note on the piano/violin; The clock struck twelve.
7. to impress, or give a particular impression to (a person). I was struck by the resemblance between the two men; How does the plan strike you?; It / The thought struck me that she had come to borrow money.
8. to mint or manufacture (a coin, medal etc).
9. to go in a certain direction. He left the path and struck (off) across the fields.
10. to lower or take down (tents, flags etc).
noun
1. an act of striking. a miners' strike.
2. a discovery of oil, gold etc. He made a lucky strike.
ˈstriker noun
1. a worker who strikes.
2. in football, a forward player.
ˈstriking adjective
noticeable or impressive. She is tall and striking; She wears striking clothes.
ˈstrikingly adverb
be (out) on strike
(of workers) to be striking. The electricity workers are (out) on strike.
call a strike
(of a trade union leader etc) to ask workers to strike.
come out on strike
(of workers) to strike.
come/be within striking distance of
to come very close to.
strike at
to attempt to strike, or aim a blow at (a person etc). He struck at the dog with his stick.
strike an attitude / a pose
to place oneself in a particular usually rather showy pose.
strike a balance
to reach a satisfactory middle level of compromise between two undesirable extremes.
strike a bargain/agreement
to make a bargain; to reach an agreement.
strike a blow for
to make an effort on behalf of (a cause etc).
strike down
to hit or knock (a person) down. He was struck down by a car / a terrible disease.
strike dumb
to amaze. I was struck dumb at the news.
strike fear/terror etc into
to fill (a person) with fear etc. The sound struck terror into them.
strike home
(of a blow, insult etc) to reach the place where it will hurt most.
strike it rich
to make a lot of money.
strike lucky
to have good luck in a particular matter.
strike out
1. to erase or cross out (a word etc). He read the essay and struck out a word here and there.
2. to start fighting. He's a man who strikes out with his fists whenever he's angry.
strike up
1. to begin to play a tune etc. The band struck up (with) `The Red Flag'.
2. to begin (a friendship, conversation etc). He struck up an acquaintance with a girl on the train.
References in periodicals archive ?
I consider home runs per strike out to be a strategic variable as well as a measure of skill and power.
Billingsley used his curveball again to strike out Bautista and work out off what could have been a mess.
The variables used for hitterswere: batting average (ba), runs batted in (rbi's), slugging average (sa), runs scored (r), strike outs (so), stolen bases (sb), and fielding average (fa).
Jose Vidro followed with an RBI single, making it 7-6, but Callaway battled back to strike out Brad Wilkerson.
Right-hander Kevin Brown allowed eight runs on six hits, didn't strike out a batter and left his Tuesday start after 2 1/3 innings with a bruise on the outside of his right knee from a batted ball.