chord

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chord1
E major chord in opening bar of Edvard Grieg's Morgenstemning

chord 1

 (kôrd)
n.
1. Music A combination of three or more pitches sounded simultaneously.
2. Harmony, as of color.
v. chord·ed, chord·ing, chords
v.intr.
Music To play chords: She chorded up and down the neck of the guitar.
v.tr.
1. To play chords on: chorded the piano.
2. To produce by playing musical chords; harmonize: chord a melody.

[Alteration (influenced by chord, musical instrument string) of Middle English cord, from accord, agreement, from Old French acorde, from acorder, to agree; see accord.]
Usage Note: The words chord and cord are often confused—and with good reason, for they are really three words, not two. There are two words spelled chord (listed as separate entries with homograph numbers in this dictionary). The first comes from the word accord and refers to a harmonious combination of three or more musical notes. The second is an alteration of cord, taking its spelling from Greek chorda, "string, gut," by way of Latin. This is the mathematical chord—a line segment that joins two points on a curve. Cord itself means "a string or rope." It has many extensions, as in an electrical cord and a cord of wood. When referring to anatomical structures, it can be spelled in general usage either as cord or chord (again by influence of Greek and Latin). Strict medical usage requires cord, however. A doctor may examine a spinal cord or vocal cords, not chords.

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chord2

chord 2

 (kôrd)
n.
1. A line segment that joins two points on a curve. See Usage Note at chord1.
2. A straight line connecting the leading and trailing edges of an airfoil.
3. Anatomy Variant of cord..
4. An emotional feeling or response: Her words struck a sympathetic chord in her audience.
5. Archaic The string of a musical instrument.

[Alteration of cord.]

chord

(kɔːd)
n
1. (Mathematics) maths
a. a straight line connecting two points on a curve or curved surface
b. the line segment lying between two points of intersection of a straight line and a curve or curved surface
2. (General Engineering) engineering one of the principal members of a truss, esp one that lies along the top or the bottom
3. (Anatomy) anatomy a variant spelling of cord
4. an emotional response, esp one of sympathy: the story struck the right chord.
5. (Aeronautics) an imaginary straight line joining the leading edge and the trailing edge of an aerofoil
6. (Instruments) archaic the string of a musical instrument
[C16: from Latin chorda, from Greek khordē gut, string; see cord]
ˈchorded adj

chord

(kɔːd)
n
(Music, other) the simultaneous sounding of a group of musical notes, usually three or more in number. See concord4, discord3
vb
(Music, other) (tr) to provide (a melodic line) with chords
[C15: short for accord; spelling influenced by chord1]
ˈchordal adj

chord1

(kɔrd)

n.
1. a feeling or emotion: Your story struck a sympathetic chord in me.
2. the line segment between two points on a given curve.
3. a principal longitudinal member of a truss, usu. one of a pair connected by a web member.
4. a straight line joining the trailing and leading edges of an airfoil section.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin chorda < Greek chordḗ gut, string]
chord′ed, adj.

chord2

(kɔrd)

n.
1. a combination of usu. three or more musical tones sounded simultaneously.
v.t.
2. to harmonize or voice with chords.
[1350–1400; earlier cord, Middle English, short for accord; ch- from chord1]
cord, chord - Cord comes from Greek khorde, "gut, string of a musical instrument," and chord is a refashioning of cord.
See also related terms for musical instrument.

chord

cord

These words are both pronounced /kɔːd/.

1. 'chord'

A chord is a number of musical notes played or sung together to produce a pleasant sound.

He played some random chords.
2. 'cord'

Cord is strong, thick string. A cord is a piece of this string.

She tied a cord around her box.

A cord is also a length of wire covered with plastic which connects a piece of electrical equipment to an electricity supply.

chord


Past participle: chorded
Gerund: chording

Imperative
chord
chord
Present
I chord
you chord
he/she/it chords
we chord
you chord
they chord
Preterite
I chorded
you chorded
he/she/it chorded
we chorded
you chorded
they chorded
Present Continuous
I am chording
you are chording
he/she/it is chording
we are chording
you are chording
they are chording
Present Perfect
I have chorded
you have chorded
he/she/it has chorded
we have chorded
you have chorded
they have chorded
Past Continuous
I was chording
you were chording
he/she/it was chording
we were chording
you were chording
they were chording
Past Perfect
I had chorded
you had chorded
he/she/it had chorded
we had chorded
you had chorded
they had chorded
Future
I will chord
you will chord
he/she/it will chord
we will chord
you will chord
they will chord
Future Perfect
I will have chorded
you will have chorded
he/she/it will have chorded
we will have chorded
you will have chorded
they will have chorded
Future Continuous
I will be chording
you will be chording
he/she/it will be chording
we will be chording
you will be chording
they will be chording
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chording
you have been chording
he/she/it has been chording
we have been chording
you have been chording
they have been chording
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chording
you will have been chording
he/she/it will have been chording
we will have been chording
you will have been chording
they will have been chording
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chording
you had been chording
he/she/it had been chording
we had been chording
you had been chording
they had been chording
Conditional
I would chord
you would chord
he/she/it would chord
we would chord
you would chord
they would chord
Past Conditional
I would have chorded
you would have chorded
he/she/it would have chorded
we would have chorded
you would have chorded
they would have chorded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chord - a straight line connecting two points on a curvechord - a straight line connecting two points on a curve
straight line - a line traced by a point traveling in a constant direction; a line of zero curvature; "the shortest distance between two points is a straight line"
2.chord - a combination of three or more notes that blend harmoniously when sounded together
musical note, note, tone - a notation representing the pitch and duration of a musical sound; "the singer held the note too long"
arpeggio - a chord whose notes are played in rapid succession rather than simultaneously
sforzando - an accented chord
common chord, triad - a three-note major or minor chord; a note and its third and fifth tones
seventh chord - a triad with a seventh added
Verb1.chord - play chords on (a string instrument)
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
play - perform music on (a musical instrument); "He plays the flute"; "Can you play on this old recorder?"
2.chord - bring into consonance, harmony, or accord while making music or singing
music - (music) the sounds produced by singers or musical instruments (or reproductions of such sounds)
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
key - regulate the musical pitch of
Translations
ائتلاف نغماتتَناغُم الأصْواتوتر
akord
akkord
kordo
akord
وتر
jännesointu
akord
akkord
kor
hljómur
akordas
akords
coardă
akord
akord
ackord
dây

chord

[kɔːd] N
1. (Mus) → acorde m
to strike a chordsonarle (algo a uno)
we must strike a common chordtenemos que encontrar un punto en común
this struck a responsive chord with everyoneesto produjo una reacción positiva en todos
to touch the right chorddespertar emociones
2. (Math, Anat) → cuerda f

chord

[ˈkɔːrd] n (= notes) → accord m
to strike a chord with sb → toucher la corde sensible de qn

chord

n
(Mus) → Akkord m; to strike the right chord (fig)den richtigen Ton treffen; to strike a sympathetic chord (fig)auf Verständnis stoßen
(Geometry) → Sehne f
(Anat) → Band nt

chord

[kɔːd] n (Mus) → accordo (Geom) → corda
to touch the right chord (fig) → toccare il tasto giusto

chord

(koːd) noun
in music, a number of notes played together.

chord

n. cuerda;
vocal ______ vocal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patrick Buchanan, a non-officeholder but a Washington insider just the same, is preaching a conservative populism that, for whatever his faults, strikes a chord among many working-class Americans.