stringent


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strin·gent

 (strĭn′jənt)
adj.
1. Imposing rigorous standards of performance; severe: stringent safety measures.
2. Constricted; tight: operating under a stringent time limit.
3. Characterized by scarcity of money, credit restrictions, or other financial strain: stringent economic policies.

[Latin stringēns, stringent-, present participle of stringere, to draw tight; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]

strin′gen·cy n.
strin′gent·ly adv.

stringent

(ˈstrɪndʒənt)
adj
1. requiring strict attention to rules, procedure, detail, etc
2. (Banking & Finance) finance characterized by or causing a shortage of credit, loan capital, etc
[C17: from Latin stringere to bind]
ˈstringency n
ˈstringently adv

strin•gent

(ˈstrɪn dʒənt)

adj.
1. rigorously binding or exacting; strict: stringent laws.
2. compelling; urgent: stringent necessity.
3. convincing; forcible: stringent arguments.
4. (of the money market) making little money available for loans or investments.
[1595–1605; < Latin stringent-, s. of stringēns, present participle of stringere to draw tight]
strin′gen•cy, n.
strin′gent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stringent - demanding strict attention to rules and procedures; "rigorous discipline"; "tight security"; "stringent safety measures"
demanding - requiring more than usually expected or thought due; especially great patience and effort and skill; "found the job very demanding"; "a baby can be so demanding"

stringent

adjective strict, tough, rigorous, demanding, binding, tight, severe, exacting, rigid, inflexible Its drug-testing procedures are the most stringent in the world.
relaxed, slack, lax, loose, flexible, vague, inconclusive, equivocal, unrigorous
Translations
صارِم، شَديد، مُتَشَدِّد
přísnýtvrdý
streng
strangur

stringent

[ˈstrɪndʒənt] ADJ
1. [controls, standards] → riguroso, severo, estricto
stringent rulesreglas fpl estrictas
2. (Fin) → tirante, difícil

stringent

[ˈstrɪndʒənt] adj [laws, rules, conditions] → strict(e); [need] → impérieux/eusestring instrument stringed instrument ninstrument m à cordesstring quartet nquatuor m à cordesstring vest n (British)marcel m résille, marcel m en résille

stringent

adj standards, laws, discipline, reformsstreng; rules, testing, training etc alsohart; measureshart, scharf; marketgedrückt; stringent economiesstrenge Sparmaßnahmen pl; they have to practise stringent economysie müssen eisern sparen

stringent

[ˈstrɪndʒnt] adj (measures, economies, tests) → rigoroso/a
stringent rules → regolamento msg stretto

string

(striŋ) noun
1. (a piece of) long narrow cord made of threads twisted together, or tape, for tying, fastening etc. a piece of string to tie a parcel; a ball of string; a puppet's strings; apron-strings.
2. a fibre etc, eg on a vegetable.
3. a piece of wire, gut etc on a musical instrument, eg a violin. His A-string broke; (also adjective) He plays the viola in a string orchestra.
4. a series or group of things threaded on a cord etc. a string of beads.
verbpast tense, past participle strung (straŋ)
1. to put (beads etc) on a string etc. The pearls were sent to a jeweller to be strung.
2. to put a string or strings on (eg a bow or stringed instrument). The archer strung his bow and aimed an arrow at the target.
3. to remove strings from (vegetables etc).
4. to tie and hang with string etc. The farmer strung up the dead crows on the fence.
strings noun plural
(in an orchestra, the group of people who play) stringed instruments, ie violins, violas, 'cellos and double basses. The conductor said the strings were too loud.
ˈstringy adjective
(especially of meat or vegetables) having a lot of tough fibres.
ˈstringiness noun
string bean
the long, edible green or yellow pod of certain beans.
stringed instruments
musical instruments that have strings eg violins, guitars etc.
have (someone) on a string
to have (a person) under one's control.
pull strings
to use one's influence or that of others to gain an advantage.
pull the strings
to be the person who is really, though usually not apparently, controlling the actions of others.
string out
to stretch into a long line. The runners were strung out along the course.
strung up
very nervous.
stringent (ˈstrindʒənt) adjective
(of rules etc) very strict, or strongly enforced. There should be much more stringent laws against the dropping of rubbish in the streets.
ˈstringently adverb
ˈstringency noun
1. the quality of being strict.
2. scarcity of money for lending etc. in times of stringency; (also adjective) The government are demanding stringency measures.
References in classic literature ?
What a situation, now, for a patriotic senator, that had been all the week before spurring up the legislature of his native state to pass more stringent resolutions against escaping fugitives, their harborers and abettors!
In the course of his lark he managed to make a wide breach in one of the university's most stringent laws.
Laws and principles are not for the times when there is no temptation: they are for such moments as this, when body and soul rise in mutiny against their rigour; stringent are they; inviolate they shall be.
Many are the enactments made at different times in the different States of Flatland, in order to minimize this peril; and in the Southern and less temperate climates where the force of gravitation is greater, and human beings more liable to casual and involuntary motions, the Laws concerning Women are naturally much more stringent.
A great curiosity came on the trustee, to disregard the prohibition and dive at once to the bottom of these mysteries; but professional honour and faith to his dead friend were stringent obligations; and the packet slept in the inmost corner of his private safe.
The Chinese government has in vain attempted to deal with the evil by stringent laws.
I felt its strengthening effect when I met the directress the next day; its stringent operation on the nerves suffered no trembling, no faltering; it enabled me to face her with firmness, to pass her with ease.
His cold and proud nature was always averse, however, from anything in the shape of public applause, and he bound me in the most stringent terms to say no further word of himself, his methods, or his successes--a prohibition which, as I have explained, has only now been removed.
I would not believe anything worse of him except under stringent proof.
Becoming a little more stringent, I see," he observed, holding it up.
And even there they were frustrated, for stringent vagrancy laws were passed and rigidly enforced.
Sacred cities, to which a periodical religious pilgrimage was enjoined, or stringent laws and customs, tending to invigorate the national bond, were the check on the old rovers; and the cumulative values of long residence are the restraints on the itineracy of the present day.