stringy


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string·y

 (strĭng′ē)
adj. string·i·er, string·i·est
1. Consisting of, resembling, or containing strings or a string.
2. Slender and sinewy; wiry.
3. Forming strings, as a viscous liquid; ropy.

string′i·ly adv.
string′i·ness n.

stringy

(ˈstrɪŋɪ)
adj, stringier or stringiest
1. made of strings or resembling strings
2. (Cookery) (of meat, etc) fibrous
3. (of a person's build) wiry; sinewy
4. (of liquids) forming in strings
ˈstringily adv
ˈstringiness n

string•y

(ˈstrɪŋ i)

adj. string•i•er, string•i•est.
1. resembling or consisting of strings or stringlike pieces: stringy weeds.
2. toughly fibrous: stringy meat.
3. lean and sinewy; wiry: a stringy build.
4. ropy, as a glutinous liquid.
[1660–70]
string′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stringy - lean and sinewy
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare
2.stringy - (of meat) full of sinews; especially impossible to chew
tough - resistant to cutting or chewing
3.stringy - forming viscous or glutinous threads
thick - relatively dense in consistency; "thick cream"; "thick soup"; "thick smoke"; "thick fog"
4.stringy - consisting of or containing string or strings
insubstantial, unsubstantial, unreal - lacking material form or substance; unreal; "as insubstantial as a dream"; "an insubstantial mirage on the horizon"

stringy

adjective
1. fibrous, tough, chewy, sinewy, gristly, wiry The meat was stringy.
2. straggly, thin, straggling, lank an enormously fat man with long, stringy gray hair
Translations
ذو ألياف
vláknitý
senettrevlet
trefjóttur; sinamikill, seigur
lifli

stringy

[ˈstrɪŋɪ] ADJ (stringier (compar) (stringiest (superl))) → fibroso, lleno de fibras

stringy

[ˈstrɪŋi] adj
[meat] → filandreux/euse
(= straggly) [hair] → filasse

stringy

adj (+er) meatsehnig, zäh, faserig; vegetablefaserig, voller Fäden; personsehnig; plant, seaweed, rootlang und dünn; hairsträhnig

stringy

[ˈstrɪŋɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (meat, celery) → filaccioso/a; (cooked cheese) → filante; (plant, hair) → lungo/a e rado/a

string

(striŋ) noun
1. (a piece of) long narrow cord made of threads twisted together, or tape, for tying, fastening etc. a piece of string to tie a parcel; a ball of string; a puppet's strings; apron-strings.
2. a fibre etc, eg on a vegetable.
3. a piece of wire, gut etc on a musical instrument, eg a violin. His A-string broke; (also adjective) He plays the viola in a string orchestra.
4. a series or group of things threaded on a cord etc. a string of beads.
verbpast tense, past participle strung (straŋ)
1. to put (beads etc) on a string etc. The pearls were sent to a jeweller to be strung.
2. to put a string or strings on (eg a bow or stringed instrument). The archer strung his bow and aimed an arrow at the target.
3. to remove strings from (vegetables etc).
4. to tie and hang with string etc. The farmer strung up the dead crows on the fence.
strings noun plural
(in an orchestra, the group of people who play) stringed instruments, ie violins, violas, 'cellos and double basses. The conductor said the strings were too loud.
ˈstringy adjective
(especially of meat or vegetables) having a lot of tough fibres.
ˈstringiness noun
string bean
the long, edible green or yellow pod of certain beans.
stringed instruments
musical instruments that have strings eg violins, guitars etc.
have (someone) on a string
to have (a person) under one's control.
pull strings
to use one's influence or that of others to gain an advantage.
pull the strings
to be the person who is really, though usually not apparently, controlling the actions of others.
string out
to stretch into a long line. The runners were strung out along the course.
strung up
very nervous.
stringent (ˈstrindʒənt) adjective
(of rules etc) very strict, or strongly enforced. There should be much more stringent laws against the dropping of rubbish in the streets.
ˈstringently adverb
ˈstringency noun
1. the quality of being strict.
2. scarcity of money for lending etc. in times of stringency; (also adjective) The government are demanding stringency measures.
References in classic literature ?
It is an ineffably oozy, stringy affair, most frequently found in the tubs of sperm, after a prolonged squeezing, and subsequent decanting.
On top of this were the rooms where they dried the "tankage," the mass of brown stringy stuff that was left after the waste portions of the carcasses had had the lard and tallow dried out of them.
From the wild stringy root of human uprightness, she has reared a due sense of the Divine justice.
Passepartout wandered for several hours in the midst of this motley crowd, looking in at the windows of the rich and curious shops, the jewellery establishments glittering with quaint Japanese ornaments, the restaurants decked with streamers and banners, the tea-houses, where the odorous beverage was being drunk with saki, a liquor concocted from the fermentation of rice, and the comfortable smoking-houses, where they were puffing, not opium, which is almost unknown in Japan, but a very fine, stringy tobacco.
Under his stringy black locks I saw his ear; it jumped upon me suddenly close to my face.
His tall, gaunt, stringy figure is insensible to fatigue, and his dry, half-sarcastic, and often wholly unsympathetic manner is uninfluenced by any change in his surroundings.
The waiter was a tall, stringy man, who gave the impression of having no spine.
I shall dream that it is resting its corded arms on the bed's head and looking down on me with its dead eyes; I shall dream that it is stretched between the sheets with me and touching me with its exposed muscles and its stringy cold legs.
He nodded his head at the tables where a very miscellaneous collection of Europeans were now engaged in eating, in some cases in gnawing, the stringy foreign fowls.
Upon the end of his long, stringy neck his little head was cocked to one side, his close-set eyes were half closed, his ears, so expressive was his whole attitude of stealthy eavesdropping, seemed truly to be cocked forward--even his long, yellow, straggly moustache appeared to assume a sly droop.
He held out his stringy hand, and the two old folk sat with bowed grey heads, their fingers intertwined, strong in each other's love and sympathy.
Hardship had stripped her fat from her till scarcely more than bones and skin and a few stringy muscles remained.