structuralism


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Related to structuralism: deconstruction

struc·tur·al·ism

 (strŭk′chər-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A method of analyzing phenomena, as in anthropology, linguistics, psychology, or literature, chiefly characterized by contrasting the elemental components of the phenomena in a system of binary opposition and examining how the elemental components are combined to make larger units.

struc′tur·al·ist adj. & n.

structuralism

(ˈstrʌktʃərəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) an approach to anthropology and other social sciences and to literature that interprets and analyses its material in terms of oppositions, contrasts, and hierarchical structures, esp as they might reflect universal mental characteristics or organizing principles. Compare functionalism
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an approach to anthropology and other social sciences and to literature that interprets and analyses its material in terms of oppositions, contrasts, and hierarchical structures, esp as they might reflect universal mental characteristics or organizing principles. Compare functionalism
3. (Linguistics) an approach to linguistics that analyses and describes the structure of language, as distinguished from its comparative and historical aspects
ˈstructuralist n, adj

struc•tur•al•ism

(ˈstrʌk tʃər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. any study or theory that embodies structural principles.
4. a school of psychology that analyzes conscious mental activity by studying the hierarchical association of structures, or complex ideas, with simpler ideas, perceptions, and sensations.
[1945–50]
struc′tur•al•ist, n., adj.
struc`tur•al•is′tic, adj.

structuralism

an emphasis in research and description upon the systematic relations of formal distinctions in a given language. Also called structural linguistics. — structuralist, n.
See also: Linguistics
functionalism.
See also: Architecture

structuralism

1. An approach to the study of language that concentrates on its internal structure as opposed to the history of its development or its relationships with other languages.
2. A critical discipline which studies a text in relation to other known elements, including knowledge of the author, contemporaneous culture, literary convention, and facts not mentioned in the text but known to intended readers in addition to the text itself.
3. Structural anthropologists see cultural forms (e.g. customs, language, and tools used by man) as projections into this world of the inner workings of the human mind. The task of anthropology is to decode these cultural forms to reveal the principles through which the human mind operates.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.structuralism - linguistics defined as the analysis of formal structures in a text or discourse
linguistics - the scientific study of language
2.structuralism - an anthropological theory that there are unobservable social structures that generate observable social phenomena
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
anthropology - the social science that studies the origins and social relationships of human beings
3.structuralism - a sociological theory based on the premise that society comes before individuals
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
sociology - the study and classification of human societies
Translations
strukturalizmus

structuralism

[ˈstrʌktʃərəlɪzəm] Nestructuralismo m

structuralism

nder Strukturalismus

structuralism

[ˈstrʌktʃrəˌlɪzm] nstrutturalismo
References in periodicals archive ?
If one wanted to stretch the matter, one could also argue that the current emphasis on form in the criticism of our "form and content" critics is a reflection of the inevitable unconscious acceptance of the relevance of structuralism in the contemporary criticism of African literature.
To summarise: Structuralism asks where meaning come from: "Does it come from the text itself?
Petronio, who excels at postmodern structuralism, decided this time to take a more emotional route with Iris latest choreography.
Successive chapters discuss semiotics, structuralism, post structuralism, psychoanalysis, historicism, feminism, and Marxism.
My general thesis is that we can apply Habermas's phrase not to the whole project of rationality deriving from the Enlightenment and its aborted or distorted project of rationalization in progress, but to what appears now, in retrospect, as France's main philosophical movement in the last century with the possible exception of Existentialism, although I would be ready to argue that Existentialism has been more "a fashion, a morality, a passion"--to quote Baudelaire on the transient half needed to make modernity modern--than a proper philosophy; I mean structuralism.
Roman World (1993) reveled in the monocausality of Annaliste structuralism.
We have seen many metalanguages in American culture in the last half of the 20th century generated by feminism, civil rights movements, peace movements, environmentalism, the abortion debate, structuralism, post-structuralism, deconstruction.
To assess national responses, Hira focuses on Chile's journey from structuralism (until 1970), followed briefly by failed socialism under Salvador Allende (1970--73), to neo-liberalism under Augusto Pinochet(1973--89).
In fact, structuralism has not been a very popular philosophy of mathematics, probably because of the hostility of Frege and other influential logicists, and quasi-logicists like Quine.
For years, he's rambled on about existentialism, modernism, structuralism, pointillism, and postmodernism, but there's surely one -ism that best describes his own work: a load of old jism.
In the area of technolore, Kevin Powell, director of the Interspace development project in the CANIS lab (Community Architectures of Network Information Systems, Graduate School of Library and Information Science), applies folkloristic concepts of structuralism versus contextualism to the design and use of computer tools.
Structuralism in the philosophy of mathematics is the view that the proper subject matter of mathematics is the relationships between various kinds of mathematical entities, rather than the entities themselves.

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