stubborn


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stub·born

 (stŭb′ərn)
adj. stub·born·er, stub·born·est
1.
a. Refusing to change one's mind or course of action despite pressure to do so; unyielding or resolute. See Synonyms at obstinate.
b. Characterized by a refusal to change one's mind or course of action; dogged or persistent: stubborn prejudice; stubborn earnestness.
2. Difficult to treat or deal with; resistant to treatment or effort: stubborn soil; stubborn stains.

[Middle English stuborn.]

stub′born·ly adv.
stub′born·ness n.

stubborn

(ˈstʌbən)
adj
1. refusing to comply, agree, or give in; obstinate
2. difficult to handle, treat, or overcome
3. persistent and dogged: a stubborn crusade.
[C14 stoborne, of obscure origin]
ˈstubbornly adv
ˈstubbornness n

stub•born

(ˈstʌb ərn)

adj.
1. unreasonably or perversely obstinate; unyielding.
2. fixed or set in purpose or opinion; resolute.
3. obstinately maintained, as a course of action: stubborn resistance.
4. difficult to handle, treat, etc.: a stubborn pain.
[1350–1400; Middle English stiborn(e), styborne, stuborn, of uncertain orig.]
stub′born•ly, adv.
stub′born•ness, n.
syn: stubborn, obstinate, dogged, persistent imply fixity of purpose or condition and resistance to change. stubborn and obstinate both imply resistance to advice, entreaty, protest, or force; but stubborn implies an innate characteristic and is the term usu. used when referring to inanimate things: a stubborn child; a stubborn lock; an obstinate customer. dogged implies willfulness and tenacity, esp. in the face of obstacles: dogged determination. persistent implies having staying or lasting qualities, resoluteness, and perseverance: persistent questioning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stubborn - tenaciously unwilling or marked by tenacious unwillingness to yield
uncompromising, inflexible, sturdy - not making concessions; "took an uncompromising stance in the peace talks"; "uncompromising honesty"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
intractable - not tractable; difficult to manage or mold; "an intractable disposition"; "intractable pain"; "the most intractable issue of our era"; "intractable metal"
docile - willing to be taught or led or supervised or directed; "the docile masses of an enslaved nation"
2.stubborn - not responding to treatment; "a stubborn infection"; "a refractory case of acne"; "stubborn rust stains"
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
intractable - not tractable; difficult to manage or mold; "an intractable disposition"; "intractable pain"; "the most intractable issue of our era"; "intractable metal"

stubborn

stubborn

adjective
Translations
عَنيدعَنِيد
tvrdohlavý
stædig
itsepäinen
tvrdoglav
òrár, òrjóskur
頑固な
고집 센
ietiepīgs
trmast
envis
ดื้อ
bướng bỉnh

stubborn

[ˈstʌbən] ADJ
1. (= obstinate) [person] → testarudo, terco, tozudo; [animal] → terco; [nature, attitude, silence, refusal] → obstinado; [resistance, insistence, determination] → obstinado, pertinaz
she has a very stubborn streakpuede ser muy testaruda or terca or tozuda
as stubborn as a muleterco como una mula
2. (= hard to deal with) [problem] → pertinaz; [stain, lock] → difícil, resistente
he had a stubborn coldtenía un resfriado persistente

stubborn

[ˈstʌbərn] adj
(= obstinate) [person, character] → têtu(e), obstiné(e); [pride, refusal] → obstiné(e)
(= determined) [resistance] → acharné(e)
(= persistent) [stain] → tenace; [problem] → persistant(e); [cough] → tenace

stubborn

adj
(= obstinate) person, insistencestur; animal, childstörrisch; to be stubborn about somethingstur auf etw (dat)beharren; she has a stubborn streaksie kann sehr stur sein
(= persistent) refusal, resistance, campaign, stain etchartnäckig; in stubborn silencestur schweigend
lock, materialwiderspenstig; weeds, coughhartnäckig

stubborn

[ˈstʌbən] adj (gen) → ostinato/a; (person) → cocciuto/a, testardo/a

stubborn

(ˈstabən) adjective
obstinate, or unwilling to yield, obey etc. He's as stubborn as a donkey.

stubborn

عَنِيد tvrdohlavý stædig stur πεισματάρης testarudo itsepäinen têtu tvrdoglav ostinato 頑固な 고집 센 koppig sta uparty teimoso упрямый envis ดื้อ inatçı bướng bỉnh 顽固的

stubborn

a. obstinado-a, testarudo-a, caprichoso-a;
v.
to be ___obstinarse, encapricharse.
References in classic literature ?
He's a stubborn fellow and hard to manage," said Mr.
He was afraid, first that he would stubbornly refuse to buy and thus lose the opportunity to sell again; second that he would not be stubborn enough and would in a moment of weakness buy what could not be sold.
Her face was rosy and solid, with bright, twinkling eyes and a stubborn little chin.
She perceived that her will had blazed up, stubborn and resistant.
Heyward, perceiving that the stubborn adherence of the scout to the cause of his friends the Delawares, or Mohicans, for they were branches of the same numerous people, was likely to prolong a useless discussion, changed the subject.
Matthew Maule, on the other hand, though an obscure man, was stubborn in the defence of what he considered his right; and, for several years, he succeeded in protecting the acre or two of earth which, with his own toil, he had hewn out of the primeval forest, to be his garden ground and homestead.
What I saw in him -- as evidently as the indestructible ramparts of Old Ticonderoga, already cited as the most appropriate simile -- was the features of stubborn and ponderous endurance, which might well have amounted to obstinacy in his earlier days; of integrity, that, like most of his other endowments, lay in a somewhat heavy mass, and was just as unmalleable or unmanageable as a ton of iron ore; and of benevolence which, fiercely as he led the bayonets on at Chippewa or Fort Erie, I take to be of quite as genuine a stamp as what actuates any or all the polemical philanthropists of the age.
Wrapping myself in my shaggy jacket of the cloth called bearskin, I fought my way against the stubborn storm.
And Ahab, he too was standing on his quarter-deck, shaggy and black, with a stubborn gloom; and as the two ships crossed each other's wakes --one all jubilations for things passed, the other all forebodings as to things to come --their two captains in themselves impersonated the whole striking contrast of the scene.
Wal, any way, thar's wrong about it somewhar," said Aunt Chloe, in whom a stubborn sense of justice was a predominant trait; "I can't jest make out whar 't is, but thar's wrong somewhar, I'm clar o' that.
This may seem to be harsh and stubborn and unconcilliatory; but it is to treat with the utmost kindness and consideration the only spirit that can appreciate or deserves it.
This ought to moderate the talk of those people who are so stubborn in maintaining that the French duel is the most health-giving of recreations because of the open-air exercise it affords.