stubborn


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stub·born

 (stŭb′ərn)
adj. stub·born·er, stub·born·est
1.
a. Refusing to change one's mind or course of action despite pressure to do so; unyielding or resolute. See Synonyms at obstinate.
b. Characterized by a refusal to change one's mind or course of action; dogged or persistent: stubborn prejudice; stubborn earnestness.
2. Difficult to treat or deal with; resistant to treatment or effort: stubborn soil; stubborn stains.

[Middle English stuborn.]

stub′born·ly adv.
stub′born·ness n.

stubborn

(ˈstʌbən)
adj
1. refusing to comply, agree, or give in; obstinate
2. difficult to handle, treat, or overcome
3. persistent and dogged: a stubborn crusade.
[C14 stoborne, of obscure origin]
ˈstubbornly adv
ˈstubbornness n

stub•born

(ˈstʌb ərn)

adj.
1. unreasonably or perversely obstinate; unyielding.
2. fixed or set in purpose or opinion; resolute.
3. obstinately maintained, as a course of action: stubborn resistance.
4. difficult to handle, treat, etc.: a stubborn pain.
[1350–1400; Middle English stiborn(e), styborne, stuborn, of uncertain orig.]
stub′born•ly, adv.
stub′born•ness, n.
syn: stubborn, obstinate, dogged, persistent imply fixity of purpose or condition and resistance to change. stubborn and obstinate both imply resistance to advice, entreaty, protest, or force; but stubborn implies an innate characteristic and is the term usu. used when referring to inanimate things: a stubborn child; a stubborn lock; an obstinate customer. dogged implies willfulness and tenacity, esp. in the face of obstacles: dogged determination. persistent implies having staying or lasting qualities, resoluteness, and perseverance: persistent questioning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stubborn - tenaciously unwilling or marked by tenacious unwillingness to yield
uncompromising, inflexible, sturdy - not making concessions; "took an uncompromising stance in the peace talks"; "uncompromising honesty"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
intractable - not tractable; difficult to manage or mold; "an intractable disposition"; "intractable pain"; "the most intractable issue of our era"; "intractable metal"
docile - willing to be taught or led or supervised or directed; "the docile masses of an enslaved nation"
2.stubborn - not responding to treatment; "a stubborn infection"; "a refractory case of acne"; "stubborn rust stains"
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
intractable - not tractable; difficult to manage or mold; "an intractable disposition"; "intractable pain"; "the most intractable issue of our era"; "intractable metal"

stubborn

stubborn

adjective
Translations
عَنيدعَنِيد
tvrdohlavý
stædig
itsepäinen
tvrdoglav
òrár, òrjóskur
頑固な
고집 센
ietiepīgs
trmast
envis
ดื้อ
bướng bỉnh

stubborn

[ˈstʌbən] ADJ
1. (= obstinate) [person] → testarudo, terco, tozudo; [animal] → terco; [nature, attitude, silence, refusal] → obstinado; [resistance, insistence, determination] → obstinado, pertinaz
she has a very stubborn streakpuede ser muy testaruda or terca or tozuda
as stubborn as a muleterco como una mula
2. (= hard to deal with) [problem] → pertinaz; [stain, lock] → difícil, resistente
he had a stubborn coldtenía un resfriado persistente

stubborn

[ˈstʌbərn] adj
(= obstinate) [person, character] → têtu(e), obstiné(e); [pride, refusal] → obstiné(e)
(= determined) [resistance] → acharné(e)
(= persistent) [stain] → tenace; [problem] → persistant(e); [cough] → tenace

stubborn

adj
(= obstinate) person, insistencestur; animal, childstörrisch; to be stubborn about somethingstur auf etw (dat)beharren; she has a stubborn streaksie kann sehr stur sein
(= persistent) refusal, resistance, campaign, stain etchartnäckig; in stubborn silencestur schweigend
lock, materialwiderspenstig; weeds, coughhartnäckig

stubborn

[ˈstʌbən] adj (gen) → ostinato/a; (person) → cocciuto/a, testardo/a

stubborn

(ˈstabən) adjective
obstinate, or unwilling to yield, obey etc. He's as stubborn as a donkey.

stubborn

عَنِيد tvrdohlavý stædig stur πεισματάρης testarudo itsepäinen têtu tvrdoglav ostinato 頑固な 고집 센 koppig sta uparty teimoso упрямый envis ดื้อ inatçı bướng bỉnh 顽固的

stubborn

a. obstinado-a, testarudo-a, caprichoso-a;
v.
to be ___obstinarse, encapricharse.
References in classic literature ?
Stern to inflict, and stubborn to endure, Who smiled in death.
The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, - nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, - all helped the emphasis.
With the snapping of her tail-shaft her life seemed suddenly to depart from her big body, and from a stubborn, arrogant existence she passed all at once into the passive state of a drifting log.
It is undoubtedly better to deceive him entirely, and since he will be stubborn he must be tricked.
Facts are stubborn things, but as some one has wisely said, not half so stubborn as fallacies.
She perceived that her will had blazed up, stubborn and resistant.
Wrapping myself in my shaggy jacket of the cloth called bearskin, I fought my way against the stubborn storm.
And Ahab, he too was standing on his quarter-deck, shaggy and black, with a stubborn gloom; and as the two ships crossed each other's wakes --one all jubilations for things passed, the other all forebodings as to things to come --their two captains in themselves impersonated the whole striking contrast of the scene.
Sore is my heart and bent my stubborn pride, With Lijah and with Lisha am I tied, My soul recoyles like Cora Doctor's Wife, Like her I feer I cannot bare this life.
Shelley was once a private person whose name had no more universal meaning than my own, and so were Byron and Cromwell and Shakespeare; yet now their names are facts as stubborn as the Rocky Mountains, or the National Gallery, or the circulation of the blood.
Nor can one express the love with which he would be received in all those provinces which have suffered so much from these foreign scourings, with what thirst for revenge, with what stubborn faith, with what devotion, with what tears.
But how strange it was that the creative instinct should seize upon this dull stockbroker, to his own ruin, perhaps, and to the misfortune of such as were dependent on him; and yet no stranger than the way in which the spirit of God has seized men, powerful and rich, pursuing them with stubborn vigilance till at last, conquered, they have abandoned the joy of the world and the love of women for the painful austerities of the cloister.