stump


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Related to stump: stump up

stump

 (stŭmp)
n.
1. The part of a tree trunk left protruding from the ground after the tree has fallen or has been felled.
2. A part, as of a branch, limb, or tooth, remaining after the main part has been cut away, broken off, or worn down.
3.
a. stumps Informal The legs.
b. An artificial leg.
4. Derogatory A short, thickset person.
5. A heavy footfall.
6. A place or an occasion used for political or campaign oratory: candidates out on the stump.
7. A short, pointed roll of leather or paper or wad of rubber for rubbing on a charcoal or pencil drawing to shade or soften it.
8. Sports Any of the three upright sticks in a cricket wicket.
v. stumped, stump·ing, stumps
v.tr.
1. To reduce to a stump.
2. To clear stumps from: stump a field.
3. To stub (a toe or foot).
4. To walk over heavily or clumsily.
5. To traverse (a district or region) making political speeches.
6. To shade (a drawing) with a stump.
7. To challenge (someone); dare.
8. To cause to be at a loss; baffle: stumped the teacher with a question.
v.intr.
1. To walk heavily or clumsily.
2. To go about making political speeches.

[Middle English stumpe, possibly from Middle Low German stump.]

stump′er n.
stump′i·ness n.
stump′y adj.

stump

(stʌmp)
n
1. (Forestry) the base part of a tree trunk left standing after the tree has been felled or has fallen
2. the part of something, such as a tooth, limb, or blade, that remains after a larger part has been removed
3. informal facetious
a. (often plural) a leg
b. stir one's stumps to move or become active
4. (Cricket) cricket any of three upright wooden sticks that, with two bails laid across them, form a wicket (the stumps)
5. (Art Terms) Also called: tortillon a short sharply-pointed stick of cork or rolled paper or leather, used in drawing and shading
6. a heavy tread or the sound of heavy footsteps
7. (Rhetoric) a platform used by an orator when addressing a meeting
8. (Building) (often plural) Austral a pile used to support a house
9. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) on the stump chiefly US and Canadian engaged in campaigning, esp by political speech-making
vb
10. (tr) to stop, confuse, or puzzle
11. (intr) to plod or trudge heavily
12. (Cricket) (tr) cricket (of a fielder, esp a wicketkeeper) to dismiss (a batsman) by breaking his wicket with the ball or with the ball in the hand while he is out of his crease
13. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly US and Canadian to campaign or canvass (an area), esp by political speech-making
14. (Forestry) (tr) to reduce to a stump; lop
15. (Forestry) (tr) to clear (land) of stumps
[C14: from Middle Low German stump; related to Dutch stomp, German Stumpf; see stamp]
ˈstumper n

stump

(stʌmp)

n.
1. the lower end of a tree trunk or plant left standing after the upper part falls or is cut off.
2. the part of a limb of the body remaining after the rest has been cut off.
3. a part of a broken or decayed tooth left in the gum.
4. any base part or short remnant remaining after the main part has been removed; stub.
5. an artificial leg.
6. Usu., stumps.Informal. the legs.
7. a short, stocky person.
8. a heavy, sometimes uneven step or gait.
9. the figurative place of political speechmaking: to go on the stump.
10. a short, thick roll of paper, leather, etc., usu. having a blunt point, for rubbing a pencil, charcoal, or crayon drawing in order to achieve subtle gradations of tone in representing light and shade.
11. each of the three upright sticks that, with the two bails laid on top of them, form a wicket in cricket.
v.t.
12. to reduce to a stump; truncate; lop.
13. to clear of stumps, as land.
14. to nonplus or render completely at a loss: The question stumped me.
15. to challenge or dare to do something.
16. to make political campaign speeches to or in: to stump a state.
17. Chiefly Southern U.S. to stub, as one's toe.
18. (of the wicketkeeper in cricket) to put (a batsman) out by knocking down a stump or by dislodging a bail with the ball held in the hand while the batsman is off his ground.
19. to tone or modify (a drawing) with a stump.
v.i.
20. to walk heavily or clumsily, as if with a wooden leg.
21. to make political campaign speeches.
Idioms:
up a stump, at a loss; perplexed.
[1200–50; (n.) Middle English stompe, c. or < Middle Dutch stomp, Middle Low German stump(e); compare Old High German stumpf]
stump′er, n.
stump•y, adj. -i•er, -i•est.

stump


Past participle: stumped
Gerund: stumping

Imperative
stump
stump
Present
I stump
you stump
he/she/it stumps
we stump
you stump
they stump
Preterite
I stumped
you stumped
he/she/it stumped
we stumped
you stumped
they stumped
Present Continuous
I am stumping
you are stumping
he/she/it is stumping
we are stumping
you are stumping
they are stumping
Present Perfect
I have stumped
you have stumped
he/she/it has stumped
we have stumped
you have stumped
they have stumped
Past Continuous
I was stumping
you were stumping
he/she/it was stumping
we were stumping
you were stumping
they were stumping
Past Perfect
I had stumped
you had stumped
he/she/it had stumped
we had stumped
you had stumped
they had stumped
Future
I will stump
you will stump
he/she/it will stump
we will stump
you will stump
they will stump
Future Perfect
I will have stumped
you will have stumped
he/she/it will have stumped
we will have stumped
you will have stumped
they will have stumped
Future Continuous
I will be stumping
you will be stumping
he/she/it will be stumping
we will be stumping
you will be stumping
they will be stumping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stumping
you have been stumping
he/she/it has been stumping
we have been stumping
you have been stumping
they have been stumping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stumping
you will have been stumping
he/she/it will have been stumping
we will have been stumping
you will have been stumping
they will have been stumping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stumping
you had been stumping
he/she/it had been stumping
we had been stumping
you had been stumping
they had been stumping
Conditional
I would stump
you would stump
he/she/it would stump
we would stump
you would stump
they would stump
Past Conditional
I would have stumped
you would have stumped
he/she/it would have stumped
we would have stumped
you would have stumped
they would have stumped

stump

Any of the three upright wooden sticks that form a wicket.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stump - the base part of a tree that remains standing after the tree has been felledstump - the base part of a tree that remains standing after the tree has been felled
plant part, plant structure - any part of a plant or fungus
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
stool - (forestry) the stump of a tree that has been felled or headed for the production of saplings
2.stump - the part of a limb or tooth that remains after the rest is removed
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
tooth - hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
limb - one of the jointed appendages of an animal used for locomotion or grasping: arm; leg; wing; flipper
3.stump - (cricket) any of three upright wooden posts that form the wicket
cricket - a game played with a ball and bat by two teams of 11 players; teams take turns trying to score runs
post - an upright consisting of a piece of timber or metal fixed firmly in an upright position; "he set a row of posts in the ground and strung barbwire between them"
grille, lattice, wicket - small opening (like a window in a door) through which business can be transacted
4.stump - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on itstump - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
Verb1.stump - cause to be perplexed or confoundedstump - cause to be perplexed or confounded; "This problem stumped her"
bewilder, dumbfound, flummox, baffle, mystify, nonplus, perplex, puzzle, stupefy, amaze, gravel, vex, pose, stick, beat, get - be a mystery or bewildering to; "This beats me!"; "Got me--I don't know the answer!"; "a vexing problem"; "This question really stuck me"
2.stump - walk heavily; "The men stomped through the snow in their heavy boots"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
3.stump - travel through a district and make political speeches; "the candidate stumped the Northeast"
campaign, run - run, stand, or compete for an office or a position; "Who's running for treasurer this year?"
4.stump - remove tree stumps from; "stump a field"
clear - remove; "clear the leaves from the lawn"; "Clear snow from the road"

stump

noun
1. tail end, end, remnant, remainder The tramp produced a stump of candle from his pocket.
verb
1. baffle, confuse, puzzle, snooker, foil, bewilder, confound, perplex, mystify, outwit, stymie, flummox, bring (someone) up short, dumbfound, nonplus Well, maybe I stumped you on that one.
2. stamp, clump, stomp (informal), trudge, plod, clomp The marshal stumped out of the room.
stump something up (Brit. informal) (with money or a sum of money as object) pay, fork out (slang), shell out (informal), contribute, hand over, donate, chip in (informal), cough up (informal), come across with (informal) Customers do not have to stump up cash for at least four weeks.

stump

verb
1. To move heavily:
2. Informal. To prevent from accomplishing a purpose:
Informal: cross.
3. Informal. To make incapable of finding something to think, do, or say:
Informal: flummox, stick, throw.
Slang: beat.
Idiom: put someone at a loss.
Translations
قُرْمَة الشَّجَرَهيُرْبِك، يُوَرِّطيَمْشي بِتَثاقُل
belhat sepahýlpařeztyčkatvyvést z míry
bringe i vildredegærdepindstampestubstump
csonkfatönkjátékból kiütnehézkesen lépkedtönk
gera orîlausanòrammaslá útstaur, hællstubbur, stúfur
bigėkaukšėtikelmasliekanasukrapštyti
apmulsinātcelmsgalsiet smagiem soļiemlāčot
ísť ťažkým krokompahýľpeň
štor
hantal adımlarla ağır ağır yürümekkökkütükşaşırmaküç hedef sopalarından her biri

stump

[stʌmp]
A. N
1. (gen) → cabo m; [of limb] → muñón m; [of tree] → tocón m; [of tooth] → raigón m
to find o.s. up a stump (US) → quedarse de piedra, estar perplejo
2. (Cricket) → palo m
3. (Art) → difumino m, esfumino m
4. to be or go on the stump (US) (Pol) → hacer campaña electoral
5. (= leg) → pierna f
see also stir B2
B. VT
1. (= perplex) → dejar perplejo or confuso
I'm completely stumpedestoy totalmente perplejo
to be stumped for an answerno tener respuesta
2. (Cricket) → eliminar
3. to stump the country (US) (Pol) recorrer el país pronunciando discursos
C. VI (= hobble, limp) → renquear, cojear
stump up (Brit)
A. VT + ADV to stump up five poundsapoquinar cinco libras, desembolsar cinco libras (for sth para comprar algo or por algo)
B. VI + ADVapoquinar, soltar la guita (for sth para pagar algo)

stump

[ˈstʌmp]
n
[tree] → souche f
[limb] → moignon m
(US) (POLITICS) (during election campaign) to be on the stump → faire campagne
vt
to be stumped → sécher, ne pas savoir que répondre
to be stumped for words → chercher ses motsstump speech n (US) (POLITICS)discours m de campagne

stump

n
(of tree, limb, tooth)Stumpf m; (of candle, pencil, tail, cigar)Stummel m; (Cricket) → Stab m; to stir one’s stumps (inf)sich rühren, sich regen
(US Pol: = platform) → Rednertribüne f; stump speakerWahlredner(in) m(f); to go out on the stumps(öffentlich or vor Ort) als Redner auftreten
vt
(Cricket) → ausschalten (durch Umwerfen der Stäbe)
(fig inf) you’ve got me stumpedda bin ich überfragt; I’m stumped by that problem, that problem’s got me stumpedich bin mit meiner Weisheit or meinem Latein am Ende (inf); to be stumped for an answerum eine Antwort verlegen sein
(US Pol) to stump the countryWahl(kampf)reisen durch das Land machen
vi (inf)stapfen; to stump along/aboutentlang-/herumstapfen

stump

[stʌmp]
1. n (of limb) → moncone m; (of pencil, tail) → mozzicone m; (of tree) → troncone m; (of tooth) → pezzo (Cricket) → paletto (della porta)
2. vt (perplex) → sconcertare, lasciare perplesso/a
to be stumped for an answer → essere incapace di rispondere
3. vi to stump in/outentrare/uscire con passo pesante
stump up
1. vt + adv (fam) → sganciare, sborsare
2. vi + adv (fam) → sborsare i soldi, sganciare i soldi

stump

(stamp) noun
1. the part of a tree left in the ground after the trunk has been cut down. He sat on a (tree-)stump and ate his sandwiches.
2. the part of a limb, tooth, pencil etc remaining after the main part has been cut or broken off, worn away etc.
3. in cricket, one of the three upright sticks forming the wicket.
verb
1. to walk with heavy, stamping steps. He stumped angrily out of the room.
2. to puzzle or baffle completely. I'm stumped!
ˈstumpy adjective
being a stump; short and thick like a stump. The cat had a stumpy tail.
stump up
to pay (a sum of money), often unwillingly. We all stumped up $2 for his present.

stump

n. muñón, parte que queda de una extremidad amputada.

stump

n (anat) muñón m
References in classic literature ?
She caught endless colds sitting on damp grass to book `delicious bit', composed of a stone, a stump, one mushroom, and a broken mullein stalk, or `a heavenly mass of clouds', that looked like a choice display of featherbeds when done.
If the desire to talk came to him when the two were walking in the fields, he sought out a stump or the top board of a fence and with his hands pounding busily talked with re- newed ease.
The old man was sitting on a stump behind the stove, crouching over as if he were trying to hide from us.
The weapons were instantly placed in the hands of the friendly opponents, and they were bid to fire, over the heads of the seated multitude, at an earthen vessel, which lay, by accident, on a stump, some fifty yards from the place where they stood.
Aye, aye, I know that he was never very jolly; and I know that on the passage home, he was a little out of his mind for a spell; but it was the sharp shooting pains in his bleeding stump that brought that about, as any one might see.
But I am going now to keep a sharp look-out on him; and if I see anything very suspicious going on, I'll just take him by the nape of his neck, and say --Look here, Beelzebub, you don't do it; and if he makes any fuss, by the Lord I'll make a grab into his pocket for his tail, take it to the capstan, and give him such a wrenching and heaving, that his tail will come short off at the stump --do you see; and then, I rather guess when he finds himself docked in that queer fashion, he'll sneak off without the poor satisfaction of feeling his tail between his legs.
The people who worked here followed the ancient custom of nature, whereby the ptarmigan is the color of dead leaves in the fall and of snow in the winter, and the chameleon, who is black when he lies upon a stump and turns green when he moves to a leaf.
Why didn't you ever take to the stump;--you'd make a famous stump orator
The sun sets on some retired meadow, where no house is visible, with all the glory and splendor that it lavishes on cities, and perchance as it has never set before--where there is but a solitary marsh hawk to have his wings gilded by it, or only a musquash looks out from his cabin, and there is some little black-veined brook in the midst of the marsh, just beginning to meander, winding slowly round a decaying stump.
But we never came to an asylum -- so I was up a stump, as you may say.
He cannot stroll around a stump and find his way home again.
If I see a stump, I took it for a man; if I trod on a stick and broke it, it made me feel like a person had cut one of my breaths in two and I only got half, and the short half, too.