stumpy


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stump

 (stŭmp)
n.
1. The part of a tree trunk left protruding from the ground after the tree has fallen or has been felled.
2. A part, as of a branch, limb, or tooth, remaining after the main part has been cut away, broken off, or worn down.
3.
a. stumps Informal The legs.
b. An artificial leg.
4. Derogatory A short, thickset person.
5. A heavy footfall.
6. A place or an occasion used for political or campaign oratory: candidates out on the stump.
7. A short, pointed roll of leather or paper or wad of rubber for rubbing on a charcoal or pencil drawing to shade or soften it.
8. Sports Any of the three upright sticks in a cricket wicket.
v. stumped, stump·ing, stumps
v.tr.
1. To reduce to a stump.
2. To clear stumps from: stump a field.
3. To stub (a toe or foot).
4. To walk over heavily or clumsily.
5. To traverse (a district or region) making political speeches.
6. To shade (a drawing) with a stump.
7. To challenge (someone); dare.
8. To cause to be at a loss; baffle: stumped the teacher with a question.
v.intr.
1. To walk heavily or clumsily.
2. To go about making political speeches.

[Middle English stumpe, possibly from Middle Low German stump.]

stump′er n.
stump′i·ness n.
stump′y adj.

stumpy

(ˈstʌmpɪ)
adj, stumpier or stumpiest
1. short and thickset like a stump; stubby
2. abounding in or full of stumps
ˈstumpiness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.stumpy - short and thick; as e.g. having short legs and heavy musculature; "some people seem born to be square and chunky"; "a dumpy little dumpling of a woman"; "dachshunds are long lowset dogs with drooping ears"; "a little church with a squat tower"; "a squatty red smokestack"; "a stumpy ungainly figure"
short, little - low in stature; not tall; "he was short and stocky"; "short in stature"; "a short smokestack"; "a little man"

stumpy

adjective chunky, short, heavy, thick, squat, stocky, stubby, dumpy, thickset, fubsy (archaic or dialect) Does this dress make my legs look stumpy?

stumpy

adjective
Short, heavy, and solidly built:
Translations
قَصير مُمْتَلئ الجِسْم
pahýlovitý
kubbslegur
hrubý a krátky

stumpy

[ˈstʌmpɪ] ADJ [person etc] → achaparrado; [pencil etc] → corto, reducido a casi nada, muy gastado

stumpy

[ˈstʌmpi] adj [person] → court(e) sur pattes; [tree] → trapu(e); [legs, tail] → court(e)

stumpy

adj (+er) pencil, candlestummelig (inf), → kurz; personstämmig, untersetzt; treeklein und gedrungen; legskurz; buildinggedrungen; a stumpy tailein Stummelschwanz m

stumpy

[ˈstʌmpɪ] adj (person) → tarchiato/a

stump

(stamp) noun
1. the part of a tree left in the ground after the trunk has been cut down. He sat on a (tree-)stump and ate his sandwiches.
2. the part of a limb, tooth, pencil etc remaining after the main part has been cut or broken off, worn away etc.
3. in cricket, one of the three upright sticks forming the wicket.
verb
1. to walk with heavy, stamping steps. He stumped angrily out of the room.
2. to puzzle or baffle completely. I'm stumped!
ˈstumpy adjective
being a stump; short and thick like a stump. The cat had a stumpy tail.
stump up
to pay (a sum of money), often unwillingly. We all stumped up $2 for his present.
References in classic literature ?
Dinah, who required large intervals of reflection and repose, and was studious of ease in all her arrangements, was seated on the kitchen floor, smoking a short, stumpy pipe, to which she was much addicted, and which she always kindled up, as a sort of censer, whenever she felt the need of an inspiration in her arrangements.
It was a donkey,' said my aunt; 'and it was the one with the stumpy tail which that Murdering sister of a woman rode, when she came to my house.
Bouncer; because Tommy Brock was so fat and stumpy and grinning.
His head was bent down, his bright eyes were fixed upon me, his stumpy hands clenched and held close by his side.
When a man is not adequately appreciated or comfortably placed in his own country, his thoughts naturally turn towards foreign climes; and David's imagination circled round and round the utmost limits of his geographical knowledge, in search of a country where a young gentleman of pasty visage, lipless mouth, and stumpy hair, would be likely to be received with the hospitable enthusiasm which he had a right to expect.
I willingly complied, though certainly so stumpy a needle as mine never took such gigantic strides over calico before.
No, no; we are not much of one mind, Judge, or you’d never turn good hunting-grounds into stumpy pastures.
To speak plainly, the fellow had, in spite of his grinning, an audacious and sinister kind of face; and as he curvetted right into the village, the old stumpy appearance of his pumps excited no little suspicion; and many a burgher who beheld him that day would have given a trifle for a peep beneath the white cambric handkerchief which hung so obtrusively from the pocket of his swallow-tailed coat.
At one of the central tables a very stumpy little priest sat in complete solitude, and applied himself to a pile of whitebait with the gravest sort of enjoyment.
The black, hairy, snub-nosed face of Vaska Denisov, and his whole short sturdy figure with the sinewy hairy hand and stumpy fingers in which he held the hilt of his naked saber, looked just as it usually did, especially toward evening when he had emptied his second bottle; he was only redder than usual.
He seated himself upon his desk, his short, stumpy legs swinging in front of him.
The dog had run on ahead and now gazed at us by the side of the Fyne's garden-gate in a tense attitude and wagging his stumpy tail very, very slowly, with an air of concentrated attention.