Stygian


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styg·i·an

also Styg·i·an  (stĭj′ē-ən)
adj.
1.
a. Gloomy and dark.
b. Infernal; hellish.
2. Of or relating to the river Styx.

[From Latin Stygius, from Greek Stugios, from Stux, Stug-, Styx.]

Stygian

(ˈstɪdʒɪən)
adj
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to the river Styx
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) chiefly literary
a. dark, gloomy, or hellish
b. completely inviolable, as a vow sworn by the river Styx
[C16: from Latin Stygius, from Greek Stugios, from Stux Styx; related to stugein to hate]

Styg•i•an

(ˈstɪdʒ i ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the river Styx or to the underworld of Greek and Roman myth.
2. (often l.c.) dark or gloomy.
3. (often l.c.) infernal; hellish.
[1560–70; < Latin Stygi(us) < Greek Stýgios (adj. derivative of Stýx, s. Styg- Styx) + -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Stygian - hellish; "Hence loathed Melancholy.../In Stygian cave forlorn"- Milton
infernal - being of the underworld; "infernal regions"
2.Stygian - dark and dismal as of the rivers Acheron and Styx in HadesStygian - dark and dismal as of the rivers Acheron and Styx in Hades; "in the depths of an Acheronian forest"; "upon those roseate lips a Stygian hue"-Wordsworth
dark - devoid of or deficient in light or brightness; shadowed or black; "sitting in a dark corner"; "a dark day"; "dark shadows"; "dark as the inside of a black cat"
Translations

Stygian

[ˈstɪdʒɪən] ADJestigio

Stygian

adj (liter) gloom, darknessstygisch (liter)
References in classic literature ?
The destiny of civilization would be decided in one final death struggle between the Red International and the Black, between Socialism and the Roman Catholic Church; while here at home, "the stygian midnight of American evangelicalism--"
I looked again, and saw him standing in the middle of a boggy Stygian fen, surrounded by devils, and he had found his bounds without a doubt, three little stones, where a stake had been driven, and looking nearer, I saw that the Prince of Darkness was his surveyor.
Him followed his next Mate, Both glorying to have scap't the STYGIAN flood As Gods, and by their own recover'd strength, Not by the sufferance of supernal Power.
My soul, from this strait prison-house set free, As o'er the Stygian lake it floats along, Thy praises singing still shall hold its way, And make the waters of oblivion stay.
Then the ape-man turned and glided into the Stygian darkness of the hut's interior.
a saintly soul floats on the Stygian river; And, Guy De Vere, hast thou no tear?
The things which the Stygian darkness hid from my objective eye could not have been half so wonderful as the pictures which my imagination wrought as it conjured to life again the ancient peoples of this dying world and set them once more to the labours, the intrigues, the mysteries and the cruelties which they had practised to make their last stand against the swarming hordes of the dead sea bottoms that had driven them step by step to the uttermost pinnacle of the world where they were now intrenched behind an impenetrable barrier of superstition.
Here and there the brilliant rays penetrated to earth, but for the most part they only served to accentuate the Stygian blackness of the jungle's depths.
Thewed like some giant god was Carthoris of Helium, yet in the clutches of these unseen creatures of the pit's Stygian night he was helpless as a frail woman.
By striking numerous matches the Belgian at last found what he sought, and when, a moment later, the sickly rays relieved the Stygian darkness about him, he breathed a nervous sigh of relief, for the impenetrable gloom had accentuated the terrors of his situation.
Bertha Kircher was no coward, whatever else she may have been, but as night began to close down around her she could not shut out from her mind entirely contemplation of the terrors of the long hours ahead before the rising sun should dissipate the Stygian gloom--the horrid jungle night--that lures forth all the prowling, preying creatures of destruction.
Tarzan and Sheeta, however, were of a different mind, for neither of them feared the jungle night, and the insistent craving of their hunger sent them off into the Stygian blackness of the forest in search of prey.