sub-


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sub-

pref.
1. Below; under; beneath: subsoil.
2.
a. Subordinate; secondary: subplot.
b. Subdivision: subregion.
3. Less than completely or normally; nearly; almost: subhuman.

[Middle English, from Latin, from sub, under; see upo in Indo-European roots.]

sub-

prefix
1. situated under or beneath: subterranean.
2. secondary in rank; subordinate: subeditor.
3. falling short of; less than or imperfectly: subarctic; subhuman.
4. forming a subdivision or subordinate part of a whole: subcommittee.
5. (Chemistry) (in chemistry)
a. indicating that a compound contains a relatively small proportion of a specified element: suboxide.
b. indicating that a salt is basic salt: subacetate.
[from Latin sub]

sub

(sʌb)

n., v. subbed, sub•bing. n.
1. a submarine.
2. a substitute.
3. a submarine sandwich.
4. a sublieutenant.
5. a subordinate.
6. a subaltern.
v.i.
7. to act as a substitute for another.
[1695–1705; by shortening of words prefixed with sub-]

sub-

1. a prefix, occurring orig. in loanwords from Latin, with the meanings “under,” “below,” “beneath” (subsoil; subway), “just outside of,” “near” (subalpine; subtropical), “less than,” “not quite” (subhuman; suboscine; subteen), “secondary,” “at a lower point in a hierarchy” (subcommittee; subplot).
2.
a. a prefix used in the names of chemical compounds that are bases.
b. a prefix used in the names of compounds in which an element is present in a relatively small proportion: suboxide.
For variants before following consonants in Latin loanwords, see su-, suc-, suf-, sug-, sum-, sup-, sur-2, sus-.
[< Latin, prefixal form of sub (preposition); akin to Greek hypó; see hypo-]

sub.

1. subordinated.
2. subscription.
3. substitute.
4. suburb.
5. suburban.
6. subway.

sub-

1. A prefix that means:
2. Underneath or lower, as in subsoil.
3. A subordinate or secondary part of something else, as in subphylum.
4. Less than completely, as in subtropical.
Translations

sub-

pref (= under, subordinate, inferior)Unter-, unter-; (esp with foreign words) → Sub-, sub-; subgroupUntergruppe f; subalpinesubalpin
References in classic literature ?
Otherwise he would be encoring it every time we had a good sub- ject, and that would be inconvenient, because I hadn't any more bombs along.
He heard no noise on board, for the young people were as sub- dued and still as people usually are who are nearly tired to death.
We were one; and as much so by our tempers and dispositions, as by the mutual hardships to which we were necessarily sub- jected by our condition as slaves.