subchief

subchief

(ˈsʌbˌtʃiːf)
n
a chief below the main chief
References in periodicals archive ?
Senior Land Management Officer, Amuru District Local Government, Gulu, 26 May 2015: Patrick Ong'ara and Zakeo Lubeja, Chief and Subchief, Gulu, 27 May 2015.
Concurrently, the British placed Tingwe (Atinga) Rabwo, a cobbler-merchant and occasional slave trader who knew the Hausa language, as subchief over Miango.
Older men had leading roles in the Spokane councils, in addition to being elected chief or subchief.
In Zvarevashe's novel, Mandivavarira is a subchief of the Sadzaguru people of Chikomba District of the pre-colonial times.
Bernie Sprague, subchief of Michigan's Saginaw Chippewa tribe, was astonished to learn that the tribe--which paid Abramoff more than $2 million from 2001 to 2003--had donated $25,000 to a group called the Capital Athletic Foundation.
Bernie Sprague, subchief of Michigan's Saginaw Chippewa (and a longtime Abramoff opponent), told senators that his tribe--which had paid Abramoff $2.
25) Established by a minor subchief of the Svosve Dynasty who was exiled from the core of their territory; see D N Beach, A Zimbabwean Past, Mambo Press, Gweru, 1994.
For example, the spark of the 1959 riots was the assault on a Hutu subchief, who was active in a Hutu party, by youths of the Rwandan National Union (UNAR, the party of the Tutsi aristocrats), and rumors that he was killed.
Regis Tribe" and to define powers and duties of subchief.
16) They were intimidated by Sulemani Kalemesa, installed by the Belgian authorities as subchief of Boga, who accused them of having British colonial sympathies.
He shot a subchief who implored the Lemhi to join the Bannock force.
Shawnodese, who is now my subchief, and director of the Apprentice Program, came here in 1979, with a background in about every new-age philosophy available.