subconsciousness


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sub·con·scious

 (sŭb-kŏn′shəs)
adj.
Not wholly conscious; partially or imperfectly conscious: subconscious perceptions.
n.
The part of the mind below the level of conscious perception. Often used with the.

sub·con′scious·ly adv.
sub·con′scious·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subconsciousness - a state of mind not immediately available to consciousness
cognitive state, state of mind - the state of a person's cognitive processes
References in classic literature ?
Behind it all, he had a subconsciousness that he was but taking a part in some mystical play; yet with an abandon which, when he stopped to think of it, astonished him, he gave himself up without effort or scruple to this most amazing interlude.
Nevertheless, in his subconsciousness was being planted the impression that, kinder than Lamai, than Agno, than Bashti, this was the kindest black he had encountered in Somo.
The sight of this gang of ruffians banded together to prey upon the clergy had given rise to an idea in the boy's mind, which had been revolving in a nebulous way within the innermost recesses of his subconsciousness since his vanquishing of the three knights had brought him, so easily, such riches in the form of horses, arms, armor and gold.
was a demiblonde, there resided dimly in his subconsciousness a conception that she was a brunette.
He was, in short, more like a German than a Frenchman; and much as they admired him, something in the subconsciousness of these Gauls was irritated at his pleading for peace in so peaceful a manner.
She is interested in communicating with her own multiple levels of consciousness and subconsciousness.
As customers weigh up their purchase decision, the ripples in their subconsciousness must resonate with their true human needs in order for them to choose your brand.
copying, whereas the consciousness or subconsciousness that the
To this day, it remains a mystery as to what really goes on in the human subconsciousness upon death.
In the first quarter of that century, however, the words subconscious, subconsciously and subconsciousness were being bandied about by Coleridge and De Quincey--two writers very familiar to Dickinson.
Also, the narrator relates that Maclan "has since confessed that he thinks that in his subconsciousness he expected [to see on the desert island] an alligator [again, my emphasis]" (108); later, readers learn that seeing Beatrice in the asylum was a moment that "Evan Maclan will remember in the last moments of death" (160).
Away games with Wolves and Nottingham Forest were always going to prove tricky for a side still getting to grips with a new coaching team, new personnel and a new philosophy gradually being drip-fed into the players' subconsciousness.