subdividable


Also found in: Legal.

subdividable

(ˌsʌbdɪˈvaɪdəbəl) or

subdivisible

adj
capable of being subdivided
References in periodicals archive ?
In its lawsuit, the lender contended the appraiser made a serious error by incorrectly determining zoning, reporting the land to have subdividable agricultural zoning when it allegedly had agricultural/preservation zoning that prevented subdivision.
The subdividable storefront space is located at the base of a luxury condominium conversion that is in the process of being redeveloped.
The input meshes included closed regular surfaces, planes with boundaries, surfaces with non subdividable polygons and the arbitrary mesh of a spaceship.
into two legal lots, says a paucity of subdividable land has pushed area builders to search for already developed parcels large enough to carve out another lot or two.
It's public knowledge that Albertsons, Winn-Dixie, Federated/May, Wal-Mart and others are dumping well-located stores in whole or subdividable.
What most home buyers would have seen as endless time, trouble, and expense, and what developers would have seen as a lot in an excellent neighborhood subdividable into four quarter-acre properties, Taylor, owner of M.
A 100,000-square-foot, subdividable spec building with 26-foot ceilings has been constructed and is now being marketed.
The point is both that (1) it is always conceptually possible to further divide what might seem to be an individual, thereby making the individual into but another subdividable species and (2) that this possibility is methodologically sound, since it urges the understanding not to rest in its analytic endeavors.
Women as an audience, subdividable into age groups and buying power, are serious targets for advertisers and owners of magazines.
Scholars have theorized these differences occur because researchers in hard disciplines, such as physics, investigate subdividable problems, whereas researchers in soft disciplines, such as English, explore holistic issues (Lodahl & Gordon, 1972; Becher, 1989).
This, allegedly, is because the mind cannot be thought of as spatial, and the mental is neither measurable, perceptible, nor subdividable.
The transportation market could be more efficient if transportation rights were fully transferable and subdividable as to injection and withdrawal points (Smith et al.