subduer


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sub·due

 (səb-do͞o′, -dyo͞o′)
tr.v. sub·dued, sub·du·ing, sub·dues
1. To subjugate (a region or people, for example) by military force.
2.
a. To bring under control by physical force, persuasion, or other means; overcome: subdued the wild horse; subdued the rebellion in the party ranks.
b. To make less intense or prominent; reduce or tone down: I was unable to subdue my excitement about the upcoming holiday.
3. To bring (land) under cultivation: Farmers subdued the arid lands of Australia.

[Middle English subduen, alteration (influenced by Latin subdere, to subject) of Old French suduire, to seduce, from Latin subdūcere, to withdraw (probably influenced by Latin sēdūcere, to seduce) : sub-, away; see sub- + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·du′a·ble adj.
sub·du′er n.

subduer

(səbˈdjuːə)
n
someone who or something that subdues
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subduer - someone who overcomes and establishes ascendancy and control by force or persuasion
controller, restrainer - a person who directs and restrains
References in classic literature ?
A half-hour later, the Lion, thoughtfully picking his teeth with his claws, told the Rattlesnake that he had never in all his varied experience in being subdued, seen a subduer try so earnestly to give it up.
One evening a "domidor" (a subduer of horses) came for the purpose of breaking-in some colts.
It is a wonderful subduer, this need of love,--this hunger of the heart,--as peremptory as that other hunger by which Nature forces us to submit to the yoke, and change the face of the world.
The land of Shakespeare, Milton, Bacon, Newton, Watt, the land of a host of past and present abstract philosophers, natural philosophers, and subduers of Nature and Art in their myriad forms, called to Mr Sparkler to come and take care of it, lest it should perish.
The Messiah comes not only as the redeemer, he comes as the subduer of Antichrist" (Illuminations 255).