subgenre


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sub·gen·re

 (sŭb′zhän′rə)
n.
A subcategory within a particular genre: The academic mystery is a subgenre of the mystery novel.

subgenre

(ˈsʌbˌʒɑːnrə)
n
a category that is a subdivision of a larger genre
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References in periodicals archive ?
Grisham makes a great contribution to the subgenre.
The modest, deliberately paced drama "Eyewitness" fits comfortably into the rural-crime subgenre.
Hard Times is a book about a largely ignored or forgotten subgenre of musicals--the adult musical.
The journal's web page via Taylor and Francis states that "the journal is also open to special issues focusing on an artist, a subgenre, or a topic.
A dozen years after the publication of Gary Shteyngart's The Russian Debutante's Handbook in 2002, which was the first notable novel in what would become a full-fledged literary subgenre, this year's abundant harvest, including besides Fishman's debut new works by Lara Vapnyar, Ellen Litman, Anya Ulinich, and, later this year, David Bezmozgis, offers a fitting excuse for wondering about this literature's future.
Barrueto wisely takes a post-colonial approach to such diverse topics as the hiring of Latino actors in the early days of film making, the growth of the subgenre of American-made Latino diversity films with and without subtitles, and the growing acceptance of Spanish-language foreign films.
Right off, it is important to note that Carlen Lavigne's Cyberpunk Women, Feminism and Science Fiction: A Critical Study is best viewed as a primer or an introductory text for the uninitiated on women's cyberpunk and the existing academic criticism that addresses the subgenre.
1] An indie subgenre so called because the musicians tended to look at their shoes while playing.
That a whole subgenre of cultural studies has evolved to document the scene is only further proof that punk rock is here to stay.
The buzz surrounding this home invasion horror was that it has the brains to reinvent the subgenre, in much the same way slasher films were reborn with Wes Craven's Scream.
Further in the critical literature, we can find many examples of authors, such as Ana Merino (2003), Jesus Jimenez Varea (2006), or Jeet Heer and Kent Worcester (2009), who indistinctly label comic strips, comic books or graphic novels as 'comics', thus terminologically including them all within the same subgenre of comic books, regardless of their intrinsic differences.
This volume sets out to treat this subgenre for the first time at length and to assert its importance in the face of global and, in particular, American mass culture (3).