subject


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Related to subject: Subject and object

subject

The subject in a sentence or clause is the person or thing doing, performing, or controlling the action of the verb. Only that which has the grammatical function of a noun can be the subject of a clause. This is because it is someone or something that is capable of performing or “controlling” the action of the verb.

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sub·ject

 (sŭb′jĕkt′, -jĭkt)
adj.
1. Being in a position or in circumstances that place one under the power or authority of another or others: subject to the law.
2. Prone; disposed: a child who is subject to colds.
3. Likely to incur or receive; exposed: a directive subject to misinterpretation.
4. Contingent or dependent: a vacation subject to changing weather.
n.
1. One who is under the rule of another or others, especially one who owes allegiance to a government or ruler.
2.
a. One concerning which something is said or done; a person or thing being discussed or dealt with: a subject of gossip.
b. Something that is treated or indicated in a work of art.
c. Music A theme of a composition, especially a fugue.
3. A course or area of study: Math is her best subject.
4. A basis for action; a cause.
5.
a. One that experiences or is subjected to something: the subject of ridicule.
b. A person or animal that is the object of medical or scientific study: The experiment involved 12 subjects.
c. A corpse intended for anatomical study and dissection.
d. One who is under surveillance: The subject was observed leaving the scene of the murder.
6. Grammar The noun, noun phrase, or pronoun in a sentence or clause that denotes the doer of the action or what is described by the predicate.
7. Logic The term of a proposition about which something is affirmed or denied.
8. Philosophy
a. The essential nature or substance of something as distinguished from its attributes.
b. The mind or thinking part as distinguished from the object of thought.
tr.v. (səb-jĕkt′) sub·ject·ed, sub·ject·ing, sub·jects
1. To cause to experience, undergo, or be acted upon: suspects subjected to interrogation; rocks subjected to intense pressure.
2. To subjugate; subdue.
3. To submit to the authority of: peoples that subjected themselves to the emperor.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin subiectus, from past participle of sūbicere, to subject : sub-, sub- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·jec′tion (səb-jĕk′shən) n.
Synonyms: subject, matter, topic, theme
These nouns denote the principal idea or point of a speech, a piece of writing, or an artistic work. Subject is the most general: "Well, honor is the subject of my story" (Shakespeare).
Matter refers to the material that is the object of thought or discourse: "This distinction seems to me to go to the root of the matter" (William James).
A topic is a subject of discussion, argument, or conversation: "They would talk of ... fashionable topics, such as pictures, taste, Shakespeare" (Oliver Goldsmith).
Theme refers especially to an idea, a point of view, or a perception that is developed and expanded on in a work of art: "To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme" (Herman Melville). See Also Synonyms at dependent.

subject

n
1.
a. the predominant theme or topic, as of a book, discussion, etc
b. (in combination): subject-heading.
2. (Education) any branch of learning considered as a course of study
3. (Grammar) grammar logic a word, phrase, or formal expression about which something is predicated or stated in a sentence; for example, the cat in the sentence The cat catches mice
4. a person or thing that undergoes experiment, analysis, treatment, etc
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who lives under the rule of a monarch, government, etc
6. (Art Terms) an object, figure, scene, etc, as selected by an artist or photographer for representation
7. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. that which thinks or feels as opposed to the object of thinking and feeling; the self or the mind
b. a substance as opposed to its attributes
8. (Classical Music) music Also called: theme a melodic or thematic phrase used as the principal motif of a fugue, the basis from which the musical material is derived in a sonata-form movement, or the recurrent figure in a rondo
9. (Logic) logic
a. the term of a categorial statement of which something is predicated
b. the reference or denotation of the subject term of a statement. The subject of John is tall is not the name John, but John himself
10. an originating motive
11. change the subject to select a new topic of conversation
adj
12. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) being under the power or sovereignty of a ruler, government, etc: subject peoples.
13. showing a tendency (towards): a child subject to indiscipline.
14. exposed or vulnerable: subject to ribaldry.
15. conditional upon: the results are subject to correction.
adv
subject to (preposition) under the condition that: we accept, subject to her agreement.
vb (tr)
16. (foll by to) to cause to undergo the application (of): they subjected him to torture.
17. (foll by: to) to expose or render vulnerable or liable (to some experience): he was subjected to great danger.
18. (foll by to) to bring under the control or authority (of): to subject a soldier to discipline.
19. rare to subdue or subjugate
20. rare to present for consideration; submit
21. obsolete to place below
Abbreviation: subj
[C14: from Latin subjectus brought under, from subicere to place under, from sub- + jacere to throw]
subˈjectable adj
subˌjectaˈbility n
ˈsubjectless adj
ˈsubject-ˌlike adj

sub•ject

(n., adj. ˈsʌb dʒɪkt; v. səbˈdʒɛkt)

n.
1. that which forms a basic matter of thought, discussion, investigation, etc.
2. a branch of knowledge as a course of study.
3. a motive, cause, or ground: a subject for complaint.
4. something or someone treated or represented in a literary composition, work of art, etc.
5. the principal melodic motif or phrase in a musical composition, esp. in a fugue.
6. a person who owes allegiance to, or is under the domination of, a sovereign or state.
7. a syntactic unit that functions as one of the two main constituents of a sentence, the other being the predicate, and that consists of a noun, noun phrase, or noun substitute typically referring to the one performing the action or being in the state expressed by the predicate, as I in I gave notice.
8. Logic. that term of a proposition concerning which the predicate is affirmed or denied.
9. a person or thing that undergoes some kind of treatment at the hands of others.
10. a person, animal, or corpse as an object of medical or scientific treatment or experiment.
11. Philos.
a. that which thinks, feels, perceives, intends, etc., as contrasted with the objects of thought, feeling, etc.
b. the self or ego.
12. Metaphysics. that in which qualities or attributes inhere; substance.
adj.
13. being under the domination, control, or influence of something (often fol. by to).
14. being under the dominion, rule, or authority of a sovereign, state, etc. (often fol. by to).
15. open or exposed (usu. fol. by to): subject to ridicule.
16. dependent upon something (usu. fol. by to): His consent is subject to your approval.
17. being under the necessity of undergoing something (usu. fol. by to): All beings are subject to death.
18. liable; prone (usu. fol. by to): subject to headaches.
v.t.
19. to bring under domination, control, or influence (usu. fol. by to).
20. to cause to undergo the action of something specified; expose (usu. fol. by to): to subject metal to intense heat.
21. to make liable or vulnerable; expose (usu. fol. by to): to subject oneself to ridicule.
22. Obs. to place beneath something; make subjacent.
[1300–50; (adj.) < Latin subjectus, past participle of subicere to throw or place beneath, make subject =sub- sub- + -icere, comb. form of jacere to throw]
sub•jec′tion, n.
syn: subject, topic, theme refer to the central idea or matter considered in speech or writing. subject refers to the broad or general matter treated in a discussion, literary work, etc.: The subject of the novel was a poor Southern family. topic often applies to one specific part of a general subject; it may also apply to a limited and well-defined subject: We covered many topics at the meeting. The topic of the news story was an escaped prisoner. theme usu. refers to the underlying idea of a discourse or composition, perhaps not clearly stated but easily recognizable: The theme of social reform runs throughout her work.

subject

The subject of something such as a book or talk is the thing that is discussed in it.

He knew what the subject of the meeting was.
What was the subject of the opera you planned to write?

subject


Past participle: subjected
Gerund: subjecting

Imperative
subject
subject
Present
I subject
you subject
he/she/it subjects
we subject
you subject
they subject
Preterite
I subjected
you subjected
he/she/it subjected
we subjected
you subjected
they subjected
Present Continuous
I am subjecting
you are subjecting
he/she/it is subjecting
we are subjecting
you are subjecting
they are subjecting
Present Perfect
I have subjected
you have subjected
he/she/it has subjected
we have subjected
you have subjected
they have subjected
Past Continuous
I was subjecting
you were subjecting
he/she/it was subjecting
we were subjecting
you were subjecting
they were subjecting
Past Perfect
I had subjected
you had subjected
he/she/it had subjected
we had subjected
you had subjected
they had subjected
Future
I will subject
you will subject
he/she/it will subject
we will subject
you will subject
they will subject
Future Perfect
I will have subjected
you will have subjected
he/she/it will have subjected
we will have subjected
you will have subjected
they will have subjected
Future Continuous
I will be subjecting
you will be subjecting
he/she/it will be subjecting
we will be subjecting
you will be subjecting
they will be subjecting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been subjecting
you have been subjecting
he/she/it has been subjecting
we have been subjecting
you have been subjecting
they have been subjecting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been subjecting
you will have been subjecting
he/she/it will have been subjecting
we will have been subjecting
you will have been subjecting
they will have been subjecting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been subjecting
you had been subjecting
he/she/it had been subjecting
we had been subjecting
you had been subjecting
they had been subjecting
Conditional
I would subject
you would subject
he/she/it would subject
we would subject
you would subject
they would subject
Past Conditional
I would have subjected
you would have subjected
he/she/it would have subjected
we would have subjected
you would have subjected
they would have subjected

subject

The part of a sentence that denotes the person or thing performing the action, usually a noun, pronoun, or noun phrase.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subject - the subject matter of a conversation or discussionsubject - the subject matter of a conversation or discussion; "he didn't want to discuss that subject"; "it was a very sensitive topic"; "his letters were always on the theme of love"
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
bone of contention - the subject of a dispute; "the real bone of contention, as you know, is money"
precedent - a subject mentioned earlier (preceding in time)
question, head - the subject matter at issue; "the question of disease merits serious discussion"; "under the head of minor Roman poets"
keynote - the principal theme in a speech or literary work
2.subject - something (a person or object or scene) selected by an artist or photographer for graphic representation; "a moving picture of a train is more dramatic than a still picture of the same subject"
thing - a separate and self-contained entity
scene, view - graphic art consisting of the graphic or photographic representation of a visual percept; "he painted scenes from everyday life"; "figure 2 shows photographic and schematic views of the equipment"
3.subject - a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?"; "teachers should be well trained in their subject"; "anthropology is the study of human beings"
occultism - the study of the supernatural
communication theory, communications - the discipline that studies the principles of transmiting information and the methods by which it is delivered (as print or radio or television etc.); "communications is his major field of study"
major - the principal field of study of a student at a university; "her major is linguistics"
frontier - an undeveloped field of study; a topic inviting research and development; "he worked at the frontier of brain science"
genealogy - the study or investigation of ancestry and family history
allometry - the study of the relative growth of a part of an organism in relation to the growth of the whole
bibliotics - the scientific study of documents and handwriting etc. especially to determine authorship or authenticity
ology - an informal word (abstracted from words with this ending) for some unidentified branch of knowledge
knowledge base, knowledge domain, domain - the content of a particular field of knowledge
science, scientific discipline - a particular branch of scientific knowledge; "the science of genetics"
architecture - the discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings; "architecture and eloquence are mixed arts whose end is sometimes beauty and sometimes use"
applied science, engineering science, technology, engineering - the discipline dealing with the art or science of applying scientific knowledge to practical problems; "he had trouble deciding which branch of engineering to study"
futuristics, futurology - the study or prediction of future developments on the basis of existing conditions
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
theology, divinity - the rational and systematic study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truth
military science - the discipline dealing with the principles of warfare
escapology - the study of methods of escaping (especially as a form of entertainment)
graphology - the study of handwriting (especially as an indicator of the writer's character or disposition)
numerology - the study of the supposed occult influence of numbers on human affairs
protology - the study of origins and first things; "To Christians, protology refers to God's fundamental purpose for humanity"
theogony - the study of the origins and genealogy of the gods
4.subject - some situation or event that is thought aboutsubject - some situation or event that is thought about; "he kept drifting off the topic"; "he had been thinking about the subject for several years"; "it is a matter for the police"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
area - a subject of study; "it was his area of specialization"; "areas of interest include..."
blind spot - a subject about which you are ignorant or prejudiced and fail to exercise good judgment; "golf is one of his blind spots and he's proud of it"
remit - the topic that a person, committee, or piece of research is expected to deal with or has authority to deal with; "they set up a group with a remit to suggest ways for strengthening family life"
res adjudicata, res judicata - a matter already settled in court; cannot be raised again
5.subject - (grammar) one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the grammatical constituent about which something is predicated
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
grammatical constituent, constituent - (grammar) a word or phrase or clause forming part of a larger grammatical construction
6.subject - a person who is subjected to experimental or other observational procedures; someone who is an object of investigation; "the subjects for this investigation were selected randomly"; "the cases that we studied were drawn from two different communities"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
7.subject - a person who owes allegiance to that nationsubject - a person who owes allegiance to that nation; "a monarch has a duty to his subjects"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
nation, country, land - the people who live in a nation or country; "a statement that sums up the nation's mood"; "the news was announced to the nation"; "the whole country worshipped him"
citizen - a native or naturalized member of a state or other political community
compatriot - a person from your own country
nationalist, patriot - one who loves and defends his or her country
8.subject - (logic) the first term of a proposition
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
term - one of the substantive phrases in a logical proposition; "the major term of a syllogism must occur twice"
Verb1.subject - cause to experience or suffer or make liable or vulnerable to; "He subjected me to his awful poetry"; "The sergeant subjected the new recruits to many drills"; "People in Chernobyl were subjected to radiation"
affect, bear upon, impact, bear on, touch on, touch - have an effect upon; "Will the new rules affect me?"
bacterise, bacterize - subject to the action of bacteria
vitriol - expose to the effects of vitriol or injure with vitriol
put - cause (someone) to undergo something; "He put her to the torture"
shipwreck - cause to experience shipwreck; "They were shipwrecked in one of the mysteries at sea"
refract - subject to refraction; "refract a light beam"
expose - expose or make accessible to some action or influence; "Expose your students to art"; "expose the blanket to sunshine"
expose - expose to light, of photographic film
incur - make oneself subject to; bring upon oneself; become liable to; "People who smoke incur a great danger to their health"
2.subject - make accountable for; "He did not want to subject himself to the judgments of his superiors"
submit - yield to the control of another
3.subject - make subservient; force to submit or subdue
dragoon - subjugate by imposing troops
enslave - make a slave of; bring into servitude
dominate, master - have dominance or the power to defeat over; "Her pain completely mastered her"; "The methods can master the problems"
4.subject - refer for judgment or consideration; "The lawyers submitted the material to the court"
give - submit for consideration, judgment, or use; "give one's opinion"; "give an excuse"
return - submit (a report, etc.) to someone in authority; "submit a bill to a legislative body"
refer - send or direct for treatment, information, or a decision; "refer a patient to a specialist"; "refer a bill to a committee"
relegate, submit, pass on - refer to another person for decision or judgment; "She likes to relegate difficult questions to her colleagues"
Adj.1.subject - possibly accepting or permitting; "a passage capable of misinterpretation"; "open to interpretation"; "an issue open to question"; "the time is fixed by the director and players and therefore subject to much variation"
susceptible - (often followed by `of' or `to') yielding readily to or capable of; "susceptible to colds"; "susceptible of proof"
2.subject - being under the power or sovereignty of another or others; "subject peoples"; "a dependent prince"
subordinate - subject or submissive to authority or the control of another; "a subordinate kingdom"
3.subject - likely to be affected by something; "the bond is subject to taxation"; "he is subject to fits of depression"
affected - acted upon; influenced

subject

noun
1. topic, question, issue, matter, point, business, affair, object, theme, substance, subject matter, field of inquiry or reference It was I who first raised the subject of plastic surgery.
2. branch of study, area, field, discipline, speciality, branch of knowledge a tutor in maths and science subjects
3. participant, case, patient, victim, client, guinea pig (informal) Subjects in the study were forced to follow a modified diet.
4. citizen, resident, native, inhabitant, national Roughly half of them are British subjects.
5. dependant, subordinate, underling, follower, vassal, liegeman His subjects regard him as a great and wise monarch.
adjective
verb
1. put through, expose, submit, lay open, make liable He had subjected her to four years of beatings and abuse.
subject to
2. liable to, open to, exposed to, vulnerable to, prone to, susceptible to, disposed to Prices may be subject to alteration.
3. bound by, under the control of, accountable to, constrained by It could not be subject to another country's laws.
4. dependent on, hanging on, contingent on, controlled by, hinging on, conditional on The merger is subject to certain conditions.

subject

adjective
1. In a position of subordination:
2. Tending to incur:
3. Determined or to be determined by someone or something else:
noun
1. A person owing loyalty to and entitled to the protection of a given state:
2. What a speech, piece of writing, or artistic work is about:
3. A sphere of activity, experience, study, or interest:
Slang: bag.
verb
1. To lay open, as to something undesirable or injurious:
2. To make subservient or subordinate:
Translations
خاضِعرَعِيَّهمَوْضُوعمَوضوع ، شَيءمَوضوع تَعْليمي
předměttémapoddanýpodmětpodrobit si
emnefaggrundledsubjekttema
ainealamalusteema
aihealamainenalistaapainostaapakottaa
tema
alanyalattvalóalávetettfüggõkitesz
efni, viîfangfrumlagláta sætaná valdi yfir, undirokanámsgrein
主題
주제
aptariamas dalykasesantgalintisobjektaspakeisti pokalbio temą
atkarīgsdisciplīnaiemeslsjautājumsmācību priekšmets
tematpoddanapoddanypodmiotprzedmiot
poddanýpodmetpodrobiť si
osebekpodložnikpredmet
predmet
ämnesubjekt
หัวข้อ
konumaruz bırakmaknedenöznesebep
chủ đề

subject

A. [ˈsʌbdʒɪkt] N
1. (= topic, theme) → tema m; (= plot) → argumento m, asunto m
to change the subjectcambiar de tema
let's change the subjectcambiemos de tema
changing the subjecthablando de otra cosa ..., cambiando de tema ...
it's a delicate subjectes un asunto delicado
on the subject ofa propósito de ...
(while we're) on the subject of moneyya que de dinero se trata ...
this raises the whole subject of moneyesto plantea el problema general del dinero
2. (Scol, Univ) → asignatura f
3. (Gram) → sujeto m
4. (Med) → caso m
he's a nervous subjectes un caso nervioso
5. (Sci) guinea pigs make excellent subjectslos conejillos son materia excelente (para los experimentos etc)
6. (esp Brit) (Pol) → súbdito/a m/f
British subjectsúbdito/a m/f británico/a
liberty of the subjectlibertad f del ciudadano
B. [ˈsʌbdʒɪkt] ADJ
1. [people, nation] → dominado, subyugado
2. subject to (= liable to) [+ law, tax, delays] → sujeto a; [+ disease] → propenso a; [+ flooding] → expuesto a; (= conditional on) [+ approval etc] → sujeto a
these prices are subject to change without noticeestos precios están sujetos a cambio sin previo aviso
subject to correctionbajo corrección
subject to confirmation in writingsujeto a confirmación por escrito
C. [səbˈdʒekt] VT to subject sb to sthsometer a algn a algo
to subject a book to criticismsometer un libro a la crítica
to be subjected to inquiryser sometido a una investigación
I will not be subjected to this questioningno tolero este interrogatorio or esta interrogación
she was subjected to much indignitytuvo que aguantar muchas afrentas
D. [ˈsʌbdʒɪkt] CPD subject heading Ntítulo m de materia
subject index N (in book) → índice m de materias; (in library) → catálogo m de materias
subject matter N (= topic) → tema m, asunto m; [of letter] → contenido m
subject pronoun Npronombre m (de) sujeto

subject

[ˈsʌbdʒɪkt]
n
(= topic) [discussion, book, letter, essay] → sujet m
The subject of my project was the internet → Le sujet de mon projet était l'Internet.
to change the subject → changer de sujet
(SCHOOL, UNIVERSITY) (academic)matière f
What's your favourite subject? → Quelle est ta matière préférée?
[photograph, painting, drawing] → sujet m
[criticism, inquiry, investigation] → sujet m
[experiment, research] → sujet m
(GRAMMAR) [verb, sentence] → sujet m
(= citizen) → sujet m
adj
to be subject to (= obliged to obey) [+ law, rules] → être soumis(e) à
to be subject to (= prone to) [+ disease, drought, floods] → être sujet(te) à
to be subject to (= liable to) [+ delay, alteration, taxes] → être sujet(e) à
to be subject to (= depend on) [+ approval, certain conditions] → être soumis(e) à
subject to confirmation in writing → sous réserve de confirmation écrite
subject to status → sujet(te) à examen du dossier
(= dependent) [peoples, territories] → assujetti(e)
[səbˈdʒɛkt] vt
to subject sb to sth [+ humiliation, abuse] → soumettre qn à qch; [+ ridicule, criticism] → exposer qn à qch
to subject sth to sth [+ city, area] (attacks, bombing)soumettre qch à qchsubject heading nrubrique f

subject

n
(Pol) → Staatsbürger(in) m(f); (of king etc)Untertan m, → Untertanin f
(Gram) → Subjekt nt, → Satzgegenstand m
(= topic, Mus) → Thema nt; the subject of the picture is …das Thema or Sujet (geh)des Bildes ist …; he paints urban subjectser malt städtische Motive; to change the subjectdas Thema wechseln; on the subject of …zum Thema (+gen); while we’re on the subjectda wir gerade beim Thema sind; while we’re on the subject of mushroomswo wir gerade von Pilzen reden, apropos Pilze; that’s off the subjectdas gehört nicht zum Thema
(= discipline, Sch, Univ) → Fach nt; (= specialist subject)(Spezial)gebiet nt
(= reason)Grund m, → Anlass m(for zu)
(= object)Gegenstand m (→ of +gen); (in experiment, = person) → Versuchsperson f, → Versuchsobjekt nt; (= animal)Versuchstier nt, → Versuchsobjekt nt; (esp Med, for treatment) → Typ m; he is the subject of much criticismer wird stark kritisiert, er ist Gegenstand häufiger Kritik; he’s a good subject for treatment by hypnosiser lässt sich gut hypnotisch behandeln; the survey team asked 100 subjectsdie Meinungsforscher befragten 100 Personen
(Philos: = ego) → Subjekt nt, → Ich nt
(Phot) → Objekt nt
adj
(= conquered)unterworfen
subject to (= under the control of)unterworfen (+dat); provinces subject to foreign ruleProvinzen plunter Fremdherrschaft; to be subject to something (to law, constant change, sb’s will)einer Sache (dat)unterworfen sein; to illnessfür etw anfällig sein; to consent, approvalvon etw abhängig sein; northbound trains are subject to delaysbei Zügen in Richtung Norden muss mit Verspätung gerechnet werden; prices/opening times are subject to change or alteration without noticePreisänderungen/Änderungen der Öffnungszeiten sind vorbehalten; all these plans are subject to last minute changesall diese Pläne können in letzter Minute noch geändert werden; subject to floodingüberschwemmungsgefährdet; to be subject to taxationbesteuert werden; subject to correctionvorbehaltlich Änderungen; all offers are subject to availabilityalle Angebote nur so weit verfügbar; subject to confirmation in writingvorausgesetzt, es wird schriftlich bestätigt; subject to certain conditionsunter bestimmten Bedingungen
vt
(= subjugate)unterwerfen; terrorists, guerrillaszerschlagen
to subject somebody to something (to questioning, analysis, treatment)jdn einer Sache (dat)unterziehen; to test alsojdn einer Sache (dat)unterwerfen; to torture, suffering, heat, ridicule, criticismjdn einer Sache (dat)aussetzen; to subject somebody to insultsjdn beschimpfen; to subject somebody to criticismjdn unter Kritik nehmen, jdn kritisieren
vr to subject oneself to something (to insults, suffering) → etw hinnehmen; (to criticism, ridicule) → sich einer Sache (dat)aussetzen; (to examination, test, questioning) → sich einer Sache (dat)unterziehen

subject

:
subject catalogue
subject heading
nÜberschrift f; (in index) → Rubrik f
subject index
nSachregister nt

subject

[n, adj ˈsʌbdʒɪkt; vb səbˈdʒɛkt]
1. n
a. (topic, gen) → argomento, soggetto (Scol) → materia
let's keep to the subject → non divaghiamo
let's drop the subject → lasciamo perdere
(while we're) on the subject of money ... → a proposito di soldi...
to change the subject → cambiare discorso
b. (Gram) → soggetto
c. (Pol) (of country) → cittadino/a; (of sovereign) → suddito/a
2. adj
a. subject to (liable to, law, tax, disease, delays) → soggetto/a a
subject to doing that (conditional upon) → a condizione di fare or che si faccia ciò
subject to confirmation in writing → a condizione di ricevere conferma per iscritto
these prices are subject to change without notice → questi prezzi sono suscettibili di modifiche senza preavviso
subject to contract (Comm) → fino a stipulazione del contratto
b. (people, nation) → assoggettato/a, sottomesso/a
3. vt to subject sb to sthsottoporre qn a qc
to subject o.s. to ridicule/criticism → esporsi al ridicolo/alle critiche
she was subjected to severe criticism → è stata duramente criticata

subject

(ˈsabdʒikt) adjective
(of countries etc) not independent, but dominated by another power. subject nations.
noun
1. a person who is under the rule of a monarch or a member of a country that has a monarchy etc. We are loyal subjects of the Queen; He is a British subject.
2. someone or something that is talked about, written about etc. We discussed the price of food and similar subjects; What was the subject of the debate?; The teacher tried to think of a good subject for their essay; I've said all I can on that subject.
3. a branch of study or learning in school, university etc. He is taking exams in seven subjects; Mathematics is his best subject.
4. a thing, person or circumstance suitable for, or requiring, a particular kind of treatment, reaction etc. I don't think her behaviour is a subject for laughter.
5. in English, the word(s) representing the person or thing that usually does the action shown by the verb, and with which the verb agrees. The cat sat on the mat; He hit her because she broke his toy; He was hit by the ball.
(səbˈdʒekt) verb
1. to bring (a person, country etc) under control. They have subjected all the neighbouring states (to their rule).
2. to cause to suffer, or submit (to something). He was subjected to cruel treatment; These tyres are subjected to various tests before leaving the factory.
subjection (səbˈdʒekʃən) noun
subjective (səbˈdʒektiv) adjective
(of a person's attitude etc) arising from, or influenced by, his own thoughts and feelings only; not objective or impartial. You must try not to be too subjective if you are on a jury in a court of law.
subˈjectively adverb
subject matter
the subject discussed in an essay, book etc.
change the subject
to start talking about something different. I mentioned the money to her, but she changed the subject.
subject to
1. liable or likely to suffer from or be affected by. He is subject to colds; The programme is subject to alteration.
2. depending on. These plans will be put into practice next week, subject to your approval.

subject

مَوْضُوع téma emne Gegenstand θέμα asignatura, asunto aihe sujet tema materia 主題 주제 onderwerp tema temat assunto предмет ämne หัวข้อ konu chủ đề 主题

sub·ject

n. sujeto.
1. término usado en referencia al paciente;
2. tópico;
3. gr. sujeto del verbo.
References in classic literature ?
Jo wanted very much to ask what his own way was, but his black brows looked rather threatening as he knit them, so she changed the subject by saying, as her foot kept time, "That's a splendid polka
The subject would become so big in his mind that he himself would be in danger of becom- ing a grotesque.
After breakfast, while the Indians were making ready the canoes, Professor Bumper, who, in a previous visit to Central America, had become interested in the subject, made a brief examination of some of the dead bats.
Her marriage with young Burden was the subject of sharp comment at the time.
Pontellier's mind was quite at rest concerning the present material needs of her children, and she could not see the use of anticipating and making winter night garments the subject of her summer meditations.
They were of hostile tribes, brought together by the influence of the American government; and it is worthy of remark, that a common policy led them both to adopt the same subject.
There being no constraint, a change of subject is always in order, and so a body is not likely to keep pegging at a single topic until it grows tiresome.
It is not, perhaps, necessary to enumerate so many reasons why the author of the Scottish Novels, as they were then exclusively termed, should be desirous to make an experiment on a subject purely English.
ASSUMING it therefore as an established truth that the several States, in case of disunion, or such combinations of them as might happen to be formed out of the wreck of the general Confederacy, would be subject to those vicissitudes of peace and war, of friendship and enmity, with each other, which have fallen to the lot of all neighboring nations not united under one government, let us enter into a concise detail of some of the consequences that would attend such a situation.
A few observations on this subject will be the more proper, as it is perceived that the adversaries of the new Constitution are availing themselves of the prevailing prejudice with regard to the practicable sphere of republican administration, in order to supply, by imaginary difficulties, the want of those solid objections which they endeavor in vain to find.
And even if he chances to take an historical subject, he is none the less a poet; for there is no reason why some events that have actually happened should not conform to the law of the probable and possible, and in virtue of that quality in them he is their poet or maker.
Of things themselves some are predicable of a subject, and are never present in a subject.