subject matter


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subject matter

n.
Matter under consideration in a written work or speech; a theme.

subject matter

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the substance or main theme of a book, discussion, debate, etc

sub′ject mat`ter


n.
the substance of a discussion, book, writing, etc., as distinguished from its form or style.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subject matter - what a communication that is about something is about
communication - something that is communicated by or to or between people or groups
body - the central message of a communication; "the body of the message was short"
corker - (dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"
reminder - a message that helps you remember something; "he ignored his wife's reminders"
petition, request, postulation - a formal message requesting something that is submitted to an authority
memorial - a written statement of facts submitted in conjunction with a petition to an authority
latent content - (psychoanalysis) hidden meaning of a fantasy or dream
subject, theme, topic - the subject matter of a conversation or discussion; "he didn't want to discuss that subject"; "it was a very sensitive topic"; "his letters were always on the theme of love"
digression, divagation, excursus, parenthesis, aside - a message that departs from the main subject
meaning, signification, import, significance - the message that is intended or expressed or signified; "what is the meaning of this sentence"; "the significance of a red traffic light"; "the signification of Chinese characters"; "the import of his announcement was ambiguous"
hokum, meaninglessness, nonsense, nonsensicality, bunk - a message that seems to convey no meaning
drivel, garbage - a worthless message
acknowledgement, acknowledgment - a statement acknowledging something or someone; "she must have seen him but she gave no sign of acknowledgment"; "the preface contained an acknowledgment of those who had helped her"
refusal - a message refusing to accept something that is offered
info, information - a message received and understood
counseling, counselling, guidance, counsel, direction - something that provides direction or advice as to a decision or course of action
dedication, commitment - a message that makes a pledge
commendation, approval - a message expressing a favorable opinion; "words of approval seldom passed his lips"
disapproval - the expression of disapproval
respects - (often used with `pay') a formal expression of esteem; "he paid his respects to the mayor"
discourtesy, disrespect - an expression of lack of respect
insertion, interpolation - a message (spoken or written) that is introduced or inserted; "with the help of his friend's interpolations his story was eventually told"; "with many insertions in the margins"
statement - a message that is stated or declared; a communication (oral or written) setting forth particulars or facts etc; "according to his statement he was in London on that day"
statement - a nonverbal message; "a Cadillac makes a statement about who you are"; "his tantrums are a statement of his need for attention"
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
opinion, view - a message expressing a belief about something; the expression of a belief that is held with confidence but not substantiated by positive knowledge or proof; "his opinions appeared frequently on the editorial page"
instruction, direction - a message describing how something is to be done; "he gave directions faster than she could follow them"
proposal - something proposed (such as a plan or assumption)
offering, offer - something offered (as a proposal or bid); "noteworthy new offerings for investors included several index funds"
submission, entry - something (manuscripts or architectural plans and models or estimates or works of art of all genres etc.) submitted for the judgment of others (as in a competition); "several of his submissions were rejected by publishers"; "what was the date of submission of your proposal?"
narration, narrative, story, tale - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program; "his narrative was interesting"; "Disney's stories entertain adults as well as children"
promotion, promotional material, publicity, packaging - a message issued in behalf of some product or cause or idea or person or institution; "the packaging of new ideas"
sensationalism - subject matter that is calculated to excite and please vulgar tastes
shocker - a sensational message (in a film or play or novel)

subject matter

noun
What a speech, piece of writing, or artistic work is about:
Translations
مادَّة المَوْضوع
téma
emne
viîfangsefni

subject matter

n (= theme)Stoff m; (= content)Inhalt m

subject matter

nargomento

subject

(ˈsabdʒikt) adjective
(of countries etc) not independent, but dominated by another power. subject nations.
noun
1. a person who is under the rule of a monarch or a member of a country that has a monarchy etc. We are loyal subjects of the Queen; He is a British subject.
2. someone or something that is talked about, written about etc. We discussed the price of food and similar subjects; What was the subject of the debate?; The teacher tried to think of a good subject for their essay; I've said all I can on that subject.
3. a branch of study or learning in school, university etc. He is taking exams in seven subjects; Mathematics is his best subject.
4. a thing, person or circumstance suitable for, or requiring, a particular kind of treatment, reaction etc. I don't think her behaviour is a subject for laughter.
5. in English, the word(s) representing the person or thing that usually does the action shown by the verb, and with which the verb agrees. The cat sat on the mat; He hit her because she broke his toy; He was hit by the ball.
(səbˈdʒekt) verb
1. to bring (a person, country etc) under control. They have subjected all the neighbouring states (to their rule).
2. to cause to suffer, or submit (to something). He was subjected to cruel treatment; These tyres are subjected to various tests before leaving the factory.
subjection (səbˈdʒekʃən) noun
subjective (səbˈdʒektiv) adjective
(of a person's attitude etc) arising from, or influenced by, his own thoughts and feelings only; not objective or impartial. You must try not to be too subjective if you are on a jury in a court of law.
subˈjectively adverb
subject matter
the subject discussed in an essay, book etc.
change the subject
to start talking about something different. I mentioned the money to her, but she changed the subject.
subject to
1. liable or likely to suffer from or be affected by. He is subject to colds; The programme is subject to alteration.
2. depending on. These plans will be put into practice next week, subject to your approval.
References in classic literature ?
For a long while they all smoked vigorously and in silence, pondering over the subject matter before them.
The subject matter of this conference was not disclosed in the parlour, but the kitchen was speedily enlightened concerning it; for Mr.
The point of the definition is not that it includes memory, but that it includes it as one of a class of phenomena which embrace all that is characteristic in the subject matter of psychology.
com)-- The Knowledge Group/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast Series, the leading producer of regulatory focused webcasts, announced today that it has scheduled a live webcast entitled "USPTO's Subject Matter Eligibility: An Update.
25, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The recently launched integrated advocacy and communications agency Subject Matter has hired veteran media and political strategist Debra DeShong.
4) These notions of "jurisdiction" depend on a case's procedural posture, and thus cannot be subject matter jurisdiction (SMJ) or jurisdiction in personam.
The level of restatements (over 10 percent of registrants) implies a level of complexity in the existing reporting model that requires subject matter experts on staff for every accounting area.
In most countries, a patentable invention is one that is: new; not obvious to the skilled person over known technology; useful; and acceptable subject matter (e.
Standardized tests have the same subject matter and the same time limits for their taking.
Good professional development A research synopsis from the American Educational Research Association describes five studies, some experimental, that demonstrate impacts on student achievement when PD focuses on how students learn and understand subject matter, strengthens teachers' knowledge of subject matter, and aligns with actual classroom conditions.
Specialized training, using subject matter experts with real-world experience, proves invaluable.
Limiting their subject matter to New York and Chicago between the 1880s and the 1950s, the authors, academics from several disciplines, nevertheless cover a wide range of topics.