subjection


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Related to subjection: abiding, ailing, ascertain, seize

sub·ject

 (sŭb′jĕkt′, -jĭkt)
adj.
1. Being in a position or in circumstances that place one under the power or authority of another or others: subject to the law.
2. Prone; disposed: a child who is subject to colds.
3. Likely to incur or receive; exposed: a directive subject to misinterpretation.
4. Contingent or dependent: a vacation subject to changing weather.
n.
1. One who is under the rule of another or others, especially one who owes allegiance to a government or ruler.
2.
a. One concerning which something is said or done; a person or thing being discussed or dealt with: a subject of gossip.
b. Something that is treated or indicated in a work of art.
c. Music A theme of a composition, especially a fugue.
3. A course or area of study: Math is her best subject.
4. A basis for action; a cause.
5.
a. One that experiences or is subjected to something: the subject of ridicule.
b. A person or animal that is the object of medical or scientific study: The experiment involved 12 subjects.
c. A corpse intended for anatomical study and dissection.
d. One who is under surveillance: The subject was observed leaving the scene of the murder.
6. Grammar The noun, noun phrase, or pronoun in a sentence or clause that denotes the doer of the action or what is described by the predicate.
7. Logic The term of a proposition about which something is affirmed or denied.
8. Philosophy
a. The essential nature or substance of something as distinguished from its attributes.
b. The mind or thinking part as distinguished from the object of thought.
tr.v. (səb-jĕkt′) sub·ject·ed, sub·ject·ing, sub·jects
1. To cause to experience, undergo, or be acted upon: suspects subjected to interrogation; rocks subjected to intense pressure.
2. To subjugate; subdue.
3. To submit to the authority of: peoples that subjected themselves to the emperor.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin subiectus, from past participle of sūbicere, to subject : sub-, sub- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·jec′tion (səb-jĕk′shən) n.
Synonyms: subject, matter, topic, theme
These nouns denote the principal idea or point of a speech, a piece of writing, or an artistic work. Subject is the most general: "Well, honor is the subject of my story" (Shakespeare).
Matter refers to the material that is the object of thought or discourse: "This distinction seems to me to go to the root of the matter" (William James).
A topic is a subject of discussion, argument, or conversation: "They would talk of ... fashionable topics, such as pictures, taste, Shakespeare" (Oliver Goldsmith).
Theme refers especially to an idea, a point of view, or a perception that is developed and expanded on in a work of art: "To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme" (Herman Melville). See Also Synonyms at dependent.

subjection

(səbˈdʒɛkʃən)
n
the act or process of subjecting or the state of being subjected
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjection - forced submission to control by others
relationship - a state involving mutual dealings between people or parties or countries
repression - a state of forcible subjugation; "the long repression of Christian sects"
oppression - the state of being kept down by unjust use of force or authority: "after years of oppression they finally revolted"
enslavement, captivity - the state of being a slave; "So every bondman in his own hand bears the power to cancel his captivity"--Shakespeare
slavery, thraldom, thrall, thralldom, bondage - the state of being under the control of another person
bondage - the state of being under the control of a force or influence or abstract power; "he was in bondage to fear:; "he sought release from his bondage to Satan"; "a self freed from the bondage of time"
peonage - the condition of a peon
confinement - the state of being confined; "he was held in confinement"
2.subjection - the act of conqueringsubjection - the act of conquering    
capture, gaining control, seizure - the act of forcibly dispossessing an owner of property

subjection

noun oppression, domination, subjugation, exploitation, persecution, suppression, enslavement the complete subjection of the prisoners to their captors
Translations
خُضوع، إخْضاع
podřízenost
underkastelse
alárendelésalávetéselnyomatásleigázásmeghódítás
undirokun
boyun eğdirmemaruz bırakma

subjection

[səbˈdʒekʃən] Nsometimiento m (to a) to be in subjection to sbestar sometido a algn
to bring a people into subjectionsubyugar a un pueblo
to hold a people in subjectiontener subyugado a un pueblo

subjection

[səbˈdʒɛkʃən] n [people] → soumission f, sujétion f

subjection

n
(= state)Abhängigkeit f; to keep a people in subjectionein Volk unterdrücken
(= act)Unterwerfung f; (of terrorists, guerrillas etc)Zerschlagung f
the subjection of somebody to something ? subject VT

subjection

[səbˈdʒɛkʃn] n (state) subjection (to)sottomissione f (a), soggezione f (a)
to hold a people in subjection → tenere un popolo in servitù

subject

(ˈsabdʒikt) adjective
(of countries etc) not independent, but dominated by another power. subject nations.
noun
1. a person who is under the rule of a monarch or a member of a country that has a monarchy etc. We are loyal subjects of the Queen; He is a British subject.
2. someone or something that is talked about, written about etc. We discussed the price of food and similar subjects; What was the subject of the debate?; The teacher tried to think of a good subject for their essay; I've said all I can on that subject.
3. a branch of study or learning in school, university etc. He is taking exams in seven subjects; Mathematics is his best subject.
4. a thing, person or circumstance suitable for, or requiring, a particular kind of treatment, reaction etc. I don't think her behaviour is a subject for laughter.
5. in English, the word(s) representing the person or thing that usually does the action shown by the verb, and with which the verb agrees. The cat sat on the mat; He hit her because she broke his toy; He was hit by the ball.
(səbˈdʒekt) verb
1. to bring (a person, country etc) under control. They have subjected all the neighbouring states (to their rule).
2. to cause to suffer, or submit (to something). He was subjected to cruel treatment; These tyres are subjected to various tests before leaving the factory.
subjection (səbˈdʒekʃən) noun
subjective (səbˈdʒektiv) adjective
(of a person's attitude etc) arising from, or influenced by, his own thoughts and feelings only; not objective or impartial. You must try not to be too subjective if you are on a jury in a court of law.
subˈjectively adverb
subject matter
the subject discussed in an essay, book etc.
change the subject
to start talking about something different. I mentioned the money to her, but she changed the subject.
subject to
1. liable or likely to suffer from or be affected by. He is subject to colds; The programme is subject to alteration.
2. depending on. These plans will be put into practice next week, subject to your approval.
References in classic literature ?
Laurie spoke excitedly, and looked ready to carry his threat into execution on the slightest provocation, for he was growing up very fast and, in spite of his indolent ways, had a young man's hatred of subjection, a young man's restless longing to try the world for himself.
Bird was a timid, blushing little woman, of about four feet in height, and with mild blue eyes, and a peach-blow complexion, and the gentlest, sweetest voice in the world;--as for courage, a moderate-sized cock-turkey had been known to put her to rout at the very first gobble, and a stout house-dog, of moderate capacity, would bring her into subjection merely by a show of his teeth.
She will never submit to any thing requiring industry and patience, and a subjection of the fancy to the understanding.
But Marianne abhorred all concealment where no real disgrace could attend unreserve; and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common-place and mistaken notions.
Proud and wilful as of old, she had brought those qualities into such subjection to her beauty that it was impossible and out of nature - or I thought so - to separate them from her beauty.
The nobles, whose power had become exorbitant during the reign of Stephen, and whom the prudence of Henry the Second had scarce reduced to some degree of subjection to the crown, had now resumed their ancient license in its utmost extent; despising the feeble interference of the English Council of State, fortifying their castles, increasing the number of their dependants, reducing all around them to a state of vassalage, and striving by every means in their power, to place themselves each at the head of such forces as might enable him to make a figure in the national convulsions which appeared to be impending.
For those different sects do not easily admit of an union with each other, or a quiet subjection to the same monarch.
They redeem his nature from the subjection of time and space; he is no longer a "puny insect shivering at a breeze"; he is the glory of creation, formed to occupy all time and all extent; bounded, during his residence upon earth, only to the boundaries of the world, and destined to life and immortality in brighter regions, when the fabric of nature itself shall dissolve and perish.
Then as to the analysis of the ancients and the algebra of the moderns, besides that they embrace only matters highly abstract, and, to appearance, of no use, the former is so exclusively restricted to the consideration of figures, that it can exercise the understanding only on condition of greatly fatiguing the imagination; and, in the latter, there is so complete a subjection to certain rules and formulas, that there results an art full of confusion and obscurity calculated to embarrass, instead of a science fitted to cultivate the mind.
Subjection of Nature's forces to man, machinery, application of chemistry to industry and agriculture, steam-navigation, railways, electric telegraphs, clearing of whole continents for cultivation, canalisation of rivers, whole populations conjured out of the ground -- what earlier century had even a presentiment that such productive forces slumbered in the lap of social labour?
There were wild mountain wolves and lions prowling all round it--poor bewitched creatures whom she had tamed by her enchantments and drugged into subjection.
The subjection in which his father had brought him up had given him originally great humility of manner; but it was now a good deal counteracted by the self-conceit of a weak head, living in retirement, and the consequential feelings of early and unexpected prosperity.