subjective


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sub·jec·tive

 (səb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Dependent on or taking place in a person's mind rather than the external world: "The sensation of pain is a highly subjective experience that varies by culture as well as by individual temperament and situation" (John Hoberman).
b. Based on a given person's experience, understanding, and feelings; personal or individual: admitted he was making a highly subjective judgment.
2. Psychology Not caused by external stimuli.
3. Medicine Of, relating to, or designating a symptom or complaint perceived by a patient.
4. Expressing or bringing into prominence the individuality of the artist or author.
5. Grammar Relating to or being the nominative case.
6. Relating to the real nature of something; essential.

sub·jec′tive·ly adv.
sub·jec′tive·ness, sub′jec·tiv′i·ty (sŭb′jĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.

subjective

(səbˈdʒɛktɪv)
adj
1. belonging to, proceeding from, or relating to the mind of the thinking subject and not the nature of the object being considered
2. of, relating to, or emanating from a person's emotions, prejudices, etc: subjective views.
3. relating to the inherent nature of a person or thing; essential
4. (Philosophy) existing only as perceived and not as a thing in itself
5. (Medicine) med (of a symptom, condition, etc) experienced only by the patient and incapable of being recognized or studied by anyone else
6. (Grammar) grammar denoting a case of nouns and pronouns, esp in languages having only two cases, that identifies the subject of a finite verb and (in formal use in English) is selected for predicate complements, as in It is I. See also nominative1
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the subjective case
b. a subjective word or speech element
Abbreviation: subj
subˈjectively adv
ˌsubjecˈtivity, subˈjectiveness n

sub•jec•tive

(səbˈdʒɛk tɪv)

adj.
1. existing in the mind; belonging to the thinking subject rather than to the object of thought (opposed to objective).
2. pertaining to or characteristic of an individual; personal: a subjective evaluation.
3. placing excessive emphasis on one's own moods, attitudes, opinions, etc.
4. Philos. relating to or of the nature of an object as it is known in the mind as distinct from a thing in itself.
5. relating to properties or specific conditions of the mind as distinguished from general or universal experience.
6. pertaining to the subject or substance in which attributes inhere; essential.
7.
a. of or designating a grammatical case that typically indicates the subject of a finite verb; nominative (contrasted with objective).
b. of or pertaining to the subject of a sentence.
8. Obs. characteristic of a political subject; submissive.
[1400–50; < Latin subjectīvus]
sub•jec′tive•ly, adv.
sub•jec′tive•ness, sub`jec•tiv′i•ty, n.

subjective

Used to describe a case of nouns and pronouns that identify the subject of a finite verb.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.subjective - taking place within the mind and modified by individual bias; "a subjective judgment"
nonsubjective, objective - undistorted by emotion or personal bias; based on observable phenomena; "an objective appraisal"; "objective evidence"
2.subjective - of a mental act performed entirely within the mind; "a cognition is an immanent act of mind"
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics

subjective

subjective

adjective
Based on individual judgment or discretion:
Translations
ذاتي
subjektivní
subjektiv
szubjektív
huglægur; hlutdrægur
subjektívny
subjektiven
öznelsübjektif

subjective

[səbˈdʒektɪv] ADJsubjetivo

subjective

[səbˈdʒɛktɪv] adjsubjectif/ive

subjective

adj
(Gram) subjective caseNominativ m

subjective

[səbˈdʒɛktɪv] adjsoggettivo/a

subject

(ˈsabdʒikt) adjective
(of countries etc) not independent, but dominated by another power. subject nations.
noun
1. a person who is under the rule of a monarch or a member of a country that has a monarchy etc. We are loyal subjects of the Queen; He is a British subject.
2. someone or something that is talked about, written about etc. We discussed the price of food and similar subjects; What was the subject of the debate?; The teacher tried to think of a good subject for their essay; I've said all I can on that subject.
3. a branch of study or learning in school, university etc. He is taking exams in seven subjects; Mathematics is his best subject.
4. a thing, person or circumstance suitable for, or requiring, a particular kind of treatment, reaction etc. I don't think her behaviour is a subject for laughter.
5. in English, the word(s) representing the person or thing that usually does the action shown by the verb, and with which the verb agrees. The cat sat on the mat; He hit her because she broke his toy; He was hit by the ball.
(səbˈdʒekt) verb
1. to bring (a person, country etc) under control. They have subjected all the neighbouring states (to their rule).
2. to cause to suffer, or submit (to something). He was subjected to cruel treatment; These tyres are subjected to various tests before leaving the factory.
subjection (səbˈdʒekʃən) noun
subjective (səbˈdʒektiv) adjective
(of a person's attitude etc) arising from, or influenced by, his own thoughts and feelings only; not objective or impartial. You must try not to be too subjective if you are on a jury in a court of law.
subˈjectively adverb
subject matter
the subject discussed in an essay, book etc.
change the subject
to start talking about something different. I mentioned the money to her, but she changed the subject.
subject to
1. liable or likely to suffer from or be affected by. He is subject to colds; The programme is subject to alteration.
2. depending on. These plans will be put into practice next week, subject to your approval.

sub·jec·tive

a. subjectivo-a;
___ symptomssíntomas ___ -s.
References in classic literature ?
The conversations were miles beyond Jo's comprehension, but she enjoyed it, though Kant and Hegel were unknown gods, the Subjective and Objective unintelligible terms, and the only thing `evolved from her inner consciousness' was a bad headache after it was all over.
Yet, as the doctor might hold such an opinion if he believed himself to be constituted differently from ordinary men; or the shipmaster adopt such a course under the impression that his vessel was a star, Agatha found false security in the subjective difference between her fellows seen from without and herself known from within.
He was small, as I have said; I was struck besides with the shocking expression of his face, with his remarkable combination of great muscular activity and great apparent debility of constitution, and--last but not least--with the odd, subjective disturbance caused by his neighbourhood.
Is it possible that love is all subjective, or all objective?
He was not what is called subjective, though when he felt that her interest was sincere, he made an almost heroic attempt to be.
Not a romance like their own, a thing to make the fortune of any author up to the mark--one who should have the invention or who COULD have the courage; but a small scared starved subjective satisfaction that would do her no harm and nobody else any good.
Many besides Angel have learnt that the magnitude of lives is not as to their external displacements, but as to their subjective experiences.
Her conversation was chiefly of what metaphysicians term the objective cast, but every now and then it took a subjective turn.
Nature and literature are subjective phenomena; every evil and every good thing is a shadow which we cast.
Doubtless in our own subjective minds lie many of the impressions and experiences of our forebears.
Well, Challenger, now is your time if you wish to study the subjective phenomena of physical dissolution.
He lived every moment of his waking hours, and he lived in his sleep, his subjective mind rioting through his five hours of surcease and combining the thoughts and events of the day into grotesque and impossible marvels.