subjectively


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sub·jec·tive

 (səb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Dependent on or taking place in a person's mind rather than the external world: "The sensation of pain is a highly subjective experience that varies by culture as well as by individual temperament and situation" (John Hoberman).
b. Based on a given person's experience, understanding, and feelings; personal or individual: admitted he was making a highly subjective judgment.
2. Psychology Not caused by external stimuli.
3. Medicine Of, relating to, or designating a symptom or complaint perceived by a patient.
4. Expressing or bringing into prominence the individuality of the artist or author.
5. Grammar Relating to or being the nominative case.
6. Relating to the real nature of something; essential.

sub·jec′tive·ly adv.
sub·jec′tive·ness, sub′jec·tiv′i·ty (sŭb′jĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.subjectively - in a subjective way; "you cannot look at these facts subjectively"
objectively - with objectivity; "we must look at the facts objectively"
Translations
ذاتِيّا
subjektivně
szubjektív módon
huglægt
subjektívne
öznel şekilde

subjectively

[səbˈdʒektɪvlɪ] ADVsubjetivamente

subjectively

[səbˈdʒɛktɪvli] advsubjectivement

subjectively

advsubjektiv

subjectively

[səbˈdʒɛktɪvlɪ] advsoggettivamente

subject

(ˈsabdʒikt) adjective
(of countries etc) not independent, but dominated by another power. subject nations.
noun
1. a person who is under the rule of a monarch or a member of a country that has a monarchy etc. We are loyal subjects of the Queen; He is a British subject.
2. someone or something that is talked about, written about etc. We discussed the price of food and similar subjects; What was the subject of the debate?; The teacher tried to think of a good subject for their essay; I've said all I can on that subject.
3. a branch of study or learning in school, university etc. He is taking exams in seven subjects; Mathematics is his best subject.
4. a thing, person or circumstance suitable for, or requiring, a particular kind of treatment, reaction etc. I don't think her behaviour is a subject for laughter.
5. in English, the word(s) representing the person or thing that usually does the action shown by the verb, and with which the verb agrees. The cat sat on the mat; He hit her because she broke his toy; He was hit by the ball.
(səbˈdʒekt) verb
1. to bring (a person, country etc) under control. They have subjected all the neighbouring states (to their rule).
2. to cause to suffer, or submit (to something). He was subjected to cruel treatment; These tyres are subjected to various tests before leaving the factory.
subjection (səbˈdʒekʃən) noun
subjective (səbˈdʒektiv) adjective
(of a person's attitude etc) arising from, or influenced by, his own thoughts and feelings only; not objective or impartial. You must try not to be too subjective if you are on a jury in a court of law.
subˈjectively adverb
subject matter
the subject discussed in an essay, book etc.
change the subject
to start talking about something different. I mentioned the money to her, but she changed the subject.
subject to
1. liable or likely to suffer from or be affected by. He is subject to colds; The programme is subject to alteration.
2. depending on. These plans will be put into practice next week, subject to your approval.
References in classic literature ?
When we perceive any object of a familiar kind, much of what appears subjectively to be immediately given is really derived from past experience.
Sure, giving the machine those training images is a bit of a trick, but Paglen's point is that any data fed to Al is chosen subjectively.
As Chairman of FANA, I can say that [Arab news agencies] are striving to build relations of professionalism based on delivering news subjectively with other news outlets," he said, adding that having this level of expertise ensures that Arab agencies perform in line with its founding regulations.
We used three methods--acoustic and aerodynamic voice analyses, the GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenicity, and strain) scale, and the voice handicap index-30 (VHI-30)--to assess vocal function objectively, perceptually, and subjectively, respectively.
Basically, I crave a normal, full and stimulating life where I can subjectively assess the likelihood of an injury when I cross the road or the probability of a terrorist assault when I socialise in my beloved Cardiff.
I crave a normal life where I can subjectively assess the likelihood of an injury when I cross the road or the probability of a terrorist assault when I socialise in my beloved Cardiff.
Supreme Court, and with it, a new case exploring what could be a significant decision when it comes to directors and officers making objectively or subjectively false statements.
The participants may be real people, not actors, but they're all goodlooking or at least "interesting," and that subjectively "colors" and limits how they progress during the challenge.
If someone subjectively feels that he can live on sunshine and rainbows rather than on food, and acts accordingly, we all know the inevitable outcome.
It is the subjectively unpleasant feelings of dread over something unlikely to happen, such as the feeling of imminent death.
CFOs have expressed dissatisfaction about the portion of their bonus that is determined subjectively.
Hambden's action, at least according to Hume, is objectively wrong--a "blameable extreme"--but subjectively right: morally appropriate in light of Hambden's beliefs.