subjectiveness


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sub·jec·tive

 (səb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Dependent on or taking place in a person's mind rather than the external world: "The sensation of pain is a highly subjective experience that varies by culture as well as by individual temperament and situation" (John Hoberman).
b. Based on a given person's experience, understanding, and feelings; personal or individual: admitted he was making a highly subjective judgment.
2. Psychology Not caused by external stimuli.
3. Medicine Of, relating to, or designating a symptom or complaint perceived by a patient.
4. Expressing or bringing into prominence the individuality of the artist or author.
5. Grammar Relating to or being the nominative case.
6. Relating to the real nature of something; essential.

sub·jec′tive·ly adv.
sub·jec′tive·ness, sub′jec·tiv′i·ty (sŭb′jĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjectiveness - judgment based on individual personal impressions and feelings and opinions rather than external facts
sound judgement, sound judgment, perspicacity, judgement, judgment - the capacity to assess situations or circumstances shrewdly and to draw sound conclusions
References in classic literature ?
Illusion, Temperament, Succession, Surface, Surprise, Reality, Subjectiveness,--these are threads on the loom of time, these are the lords of life.
There is the whole issue of subjectiveness in the manner in which these cases have been picked up," says a lawyer.
The QVscribe is analysis is based on eight quality measures: imperatives, negative imperatives, options, weaknesses, vagueness, subjectiveness, continuances, and directives.
Linguistic terms have been found intuitively easy to use in expressing the subjectiveness and imprecision of risk assessments [3, 23].
The present study aimed to address some of this subjectiveness by using neuro-imaging markers to assess structural changes in the brain and examine the relationship with Mediterranean diet adherence.
In Victorian fiction, a principal female character's subjectiveness is established via her dress.
First, to decide if an interest is "compelling" requires one to subjectively assess the interest's worth, and second, the subjectiveness is exacerbated by the failure of the Supreme Court and Congress to define what "compelling governmental interest" means (143)--aside from being an "interest of the highest order," (144) the term is standardless.
102) Due to the myriad of inconsistencies in applying the deliberate indifference theory to Fourteenth Amendment claims, a circuit split developed as to whether the correct standard is one of objectiveness or subjectiveness in this context.
These are much safer claims to file than a discrimination claim because there is less subjectiveness, fewer unknowns about the claims, and a more likely chance to survive a summary judgment motion even in weak cases.
Despite appropriate efforts are taken to control subjectiveness of the responses of faculty members using validity and reliability methods presence of subjectiveness in the responses of the faculty members cannot be ignored.
Certainly, such a target is always exposed to dynamics and the inherent subjectiveness of politics and political confrontation.