subjectivism


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sub·jec·tiv·ism

 (səb-jĕk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality of being subjective.
2.
a. The doctrine that all knowledge is restricted to the conscious self and its sensory states.
b. A theory or doctrine that emphasizes the subjective elements in experience.
3. Any of various theories holding that the only valid standard of judgment is that of the individual. For example, ethical subjectivism holds that individual conscience is the only appropriate standard for moral judgment.

sub·jec′tiv·ist n.
sub·jec′tiv·is′tic adj.

subjectivism

(səbˈdʒɛktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the meta-ethical doctrine that there are no absolute moral values but that these are variable in the same way as taste is
2. (Philosophy) any similar philosophical theory, for example, about truth or perception
3. (Theology) any theological theory that attaches primary importance to religious experience
4. the quality or condition of being subjective
subˈjectivist n
subˌjectiˈvistic adj
subˌjectiˈvistically adv

sub•jec•tiv•ism

(səbˈdʒɛk təˌvɪz əm)

n.
1. the doctrine that all knowledge is limited to experiences by the self, and that transcendent knowledge is impossible.
2.
a. any of various theories maintaining that moral judgments are statements concerning the emotional or mental reactions of the individual or the community.
b. any of several theories holding that certain states of thought or feeling are the highest good.
[1855–60]
sub•jec′tiv•ist, n.
sub•jec`ti•vis′tic, adj.

subjectivism

1. Epistemology. the doctrine that all knowledge is limited to experiences by the self and that all transcendent knowledge is impossible.
2. Ethics. the theory that certain states of feeling or thought are the highest good.
3. Ethics. the doctrine that the good and the right can be distinguished only by individual feeling. — subjectivist, n.subjectivistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
the views and behavior of one who tends to be affected by the emotional qualities of an event, argument, or problem. Also called subjectivity.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjectivism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge and value are dependent on and limited by your subjective experience
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.subjectivism - the quality of being subjective
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
Translations

subjectivism

[səbˈdʒektɪvɪzəm] Nsubjetivismo m

subjectivism

References in classic literature ?
Bog-lights, vapours of mysticism, psychic overtones, soul orgies, wailings among the shadows, weird gnosticisms, veils and tissues of words, gibbering subjectivisms, gropings and maunderings, ontological fantasies, pan-psychic hallucinations--this is the stuff, the phantasms of hope, that fills your bookshelves.
Similarly Greenfield's subjectivism can be seen to have suffered from its incapacity to deal with questions about how people develop moral knowledge and how conflicting values could be arbitrated.
11) By conceptualizing objectivity in terms of a connection between a belief or assertion and a mind-independent state of affairs, proponents of objectivity all but guarantee creation of objectivism's opposite, subjectivism.
He spells out in systematic detail the process of change, for example, from the cold war to a monopolar world, and from enlightenment rationalism to subjectivism and emotionalism.
Modernism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries challenged an uncritical and unhistorical orthodoxy, but it also fostered subjectivism, relativism and a deeply rooted skepticism toward anything supernatural.
This would affect the type of positive view that might be defended, but would not limit it to the kind of crude subjectivism Moody-Adams explicitly rules out.
Only disclosure, Dupre argues, is best suited to understanding the nature of religious truth because it is less tainted by modern subjectivism and so remains open to the experience of presence.
It may be tactless to ask what Steen adds to Hamsun's innovative subjectivism, or whether the nineteenth-century spiritual crisis was more powerfully attested by nineteenth-century authors.
The Distinction Between Subjectivism and Objectivism
After an instructive demonstration, in the first two chapters, of the shortcomings of non-cognitivism and subjectivism, Zemach's conclusion is positively established by a demonstration, in Chapters 3-5, of the truth of aesthetic realism.
Because as ethical theories go, subjectivism is about as bad as they come.
One such reason has to do with the fact that subjectivism is so appealingly simple.