subjectivism


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sub·jec·tiv·ism

 (səb-jĕk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality of being subjective.
2.
a. The doctrine that all knowledge is restricted to the conscious self and its sensory states.
b. A theory or doctrine that emphasizes the subjective elements in experience.
3. Any of various theories holding that the only valid standard of judgment is that of the individual. For example, ethical subjectivism holds that individual conscience is the only appropriate standard for moral judgment.

sub·jec′tiv·ist n.
sub·jec′tiv·is′tic adj.

subjectivism

(səbˈdʒɛktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the meta-ethical doctrine that there are no absolute moral values but that these are variable in the same way as taste is
2. (Philosophy) any similar philosophical theory, for example, about truth or perception
3. (Theology) any theological theory that attaches primary importance to religious experience
4. the quality or condition of being subjective
subˈjectivist n
subˌjectiˈvistic adj
subˌjectiˈvistically adv

sub•jec•tiv•ism

(səbˈdʒɛk təˌvɪz əm)

n.
1. the doctrine that all knowledge is limited to experiences by the self, and that transcendent knowledge is impossible.
2.
a. any of various theories maintaining that moral judgments are statements concerning the emotional or mental reactions of the individual or the community.
b. any of several theories holding that certain states of thought or feeling are the highest good.
[1855–60]
sub•jec′tiv•ist, n.
sub•jec`ti•vis′tic, adj.

subjectivism

1. Epistemology. the doctrine that all knowledge is limited to experiences by the self and that all transcendent knowledge is impossible.
2. Ethics. the theory that certain states of feeling or thought are the highest good.
3. Ethics. the doctrine that the good and the right can be distinguished only by individual feeling. — subjectivist, n.subjectivistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
the views and behavior of one who tends to be affected by the emotional qualities of an event, argument, or problem. Also called subjectivity.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjectivism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge and value are dependent on and limited by your subjective experience
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.subjectivism - the quality of being subjective
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
Translations

subjectivism

[səbˈdʒektɪvɪzəm] Nsubjetivismo m

subjectivism

References in periodicals archive ?
The three further chapters of the book juxtapose later Rahnerian and Heideggerian texts in order to expand the contrast between modern subjectivism and Rahner's aesthetic sublime.
Also, he defines and explains Simple Ethical Subjectivism and uses examples from Match Point (2005), The Shape of Things (2003), and The Emperor's New Groove (2000), followed by plot summaries of the latter two films.
Yet it would seem that Isserlis and Mustonen are very well informed as to the aesthetic principles Martinu adhered to, aiming to shift away from subjectivism, to express an artistic idea as naturally as possible and to cast off the weight of Romanticism.
Salah bin Ali also stressed the importance of the GCC countries' supportiveness to each other in this aspect as one bloc to defend their accomplishments and gains against unrealistic criticism and attempts at tarnishing their accomplishments under false justifications which have nothing to do with accuracy, neutrality and subjectivism.
Philosophy for a Better World comes from a Dutch philosopher who discusses universal subjectivism, which can be adopted by any regardless of philosophical bent, and which considers the universal capacity for suffering and happiness.
the Netherlands) presents an ethical theory he calls "universal subjectivism," relating to the universal capacity to suffer we all possess.
Subjectivism and Objectivism in the History of Economic Thought
Some readers question whether Aristotle is able to avoid the pitfalls of subjectivism and egoism, given the level of attention that he gives to identifying and discussing the necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for a person attaining a flourishing life.
2) Subjectivism is usually formulated in terms of what the agent actually believes would be morally appropriate.
This point, in itself worthy of further attention, is used by Enoch against forms of speaker- or society-relative subjectivism (and, not without some strain, against expressivism).
It greases the thin edge of the wedge of ethical subjectivism of the collectivist variety, and therefore utilitarianism.
Fiddes thus argues that Baptists avoid the subjectivism often associated with sects--he grounds Baptists' mediating position in the objective covenant between Christ and the universal church.