Subjects


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sub·ject

 (sŭb′jĕkt′, -jĭkt)
adj.
1. Being in a position or in circumstances that place one under the power or authority of another or others: subject to the law.
2. Prone; disposed: a child who is subject to colds.
3. Likely to incur or receive; exposed: a directive subject to misinterpretation.
4. Contingent or dependent: a vacation subject to changing weather.
n.
1. One who is under the rule of another or others, especially one who owes allegiance to a government or ruler.
2.
a. One concerning which something is said or done; a person or thing being discussed or dealt with: a subject of gossip.
b. Something that is treated or indicated in a work of art.
c. Music A theme of a composition, especially a fugue.
3. A course or area of study: Math is her best subject.
4. A basis for action; a cause.
5.
a. One that experiences or is subjected to something: the subject of ridicule.
b. A person or animal that is the object of medical or scientific study: The experiment involved 12 subjects.
c. A corpse intended for anatomical study and dissection.
d. One who is under surveillance: The subject was observed leaving the scene of the murder.
6. Grammar The noun, noun phrase, or pronoun in a sentence or clause that denotes the doer of the action or what is described by the predicate.
7. Logic The term of a proposition about which something is affirmed or denied.
8. Philosophy
a. The essential nature or substance of something as distinguished from its attributes.
b. The mind or thinking part as distinguished from the object of thought.
tr.v. (səb-jĕkt′) sub·ject·ed, sub·ject·ing, sub·jects
1. To cause to experience, undergo, or be acted upon: suspects subjected to interrogation; rocks subjected to intense pressure.
2. To subjugate; subdue.
3. To submit to the authority of: peoples that subjected themselves to the emperor.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin subiectus, from past participle of sūbicere, to subject : sub-, sub- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·jec′tion (səb-jĕk′shən) n.
Synonyms: subject, matter, topic, theme
These nouns denote the principal idea or point of a speech, a piece of writing, or an artistic work. Subject is the most general: "Well, honor is the subject of my story" (Shakespeare).
Matter refers to the material that is the object of thought or discourse: "This distinction seems to me to go to the root of the matter" (William James).
A topic is a subject of discussion, argument, or conversation: "They would talk of ... fashionable topics, such as pictures, taste, Shakespeare" (Oliver Goldsmith).
Theme refers especially to an idea, a point of view, or a perception that is developed and expanded on in a work of art: "To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme" (Herman Melville). See Also Synonyms at dependent.

Subjects

 those under the dominion of a reigning prince, collectivelyWilkes.
References in classic literature ?
She always used to take his arm on these occasions, now she did not, and he made no complaint, which was a bad sign, but talked on rapidly about all sorts of faraway subjects, till they turned from the road into the little path that led homeward through the grove.
This they did, as is testified to by a long list of books and magazine articles since turned out by the scientist, dealing strictly with archaeo- logical subjects, touching on the ancient Mayan race and its civilization, with particular reference to their system of computing time.
The Cutters had major as well as minor subjects for dispute.
Among his actual auditors, however, it merely gave him an additional claim to that respect which they never withhold from such as are believed to be the subjects of mental alienation.
It was as if, at moments, we were perpetually coming into sight of subjects before which we must stop short, turning suddenly out of alleys that we perceived to be blind, closing with a little bang that made us look at each other--for, like all bangs, it was something louder than we had intended--the doors we had indiscreetly opened.
I say, we good Presbyterian christians should be charitable in these things, and not fancy ourselves so vastly superior to other mortals, pagans and what not, because of their half-crazy conceits on these subjects.
Yet are there those who will still do it; notwithstanding the fact that the oil obtained from such subjects is of a very inferior quality, and by no means of the nature of attar-of-rose.
or swine, or the packing of any of their products, the carcasses or products of which are to become subjects of interstate or foreign commerce, shall make application to the Secretary of Agriculture for inspection of said animals and their products.
There's different ways, you know, of looking at all subjects.
I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward.
Undoubtedly, all men are not equally fit subjects for civilization; and because the majority, like dogs and sheep, are tame by inherited disposition, this is no reason why the others should have their natures broken that they may be reduced to the same level.
Of course I was all the talk -- all other subjects were dropped; even the king became suddenly a per- son of minor interest and notoriety.