subjunctive mood


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subjunctive mood

The subjunctive mood refers to verbs that are used to describe hypothetical or non-real actions, events, or situations. This is in comparison to the indicative mood, which is used to express factual, non-hypothetical information.
We most commonly use the subjunctive mood to express desires or wishes; to express commands, suggestions, requests, or statements of necessity; or to describe hypothetical outcomes that depend on certain conditions.
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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjunctive mood - a mood that represents an act or state (not as a fact but) as contingent or possible
modality, mood, mode - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
Translations
konjunktiivisubjunktiivi
kötőmód
References in classic literature ?
The subjunctive mood, past perfect tense of the verb `to know.
Miss Dearborn had not thought of it before, but on reflection she believed the subjunctive mood was a "sad" one and "if" rather a sorry "part of speech.
She thought it good for them to see that she could make an excellent lather while she corrected their blunders "without looking,"-- that a woman with her sleeves tucked up above her elbows might know all about the Subjunctive Mood or the Torrid Zone--that, in short, she might possess "education" and other good things ending in "tion," and worthy to be pronounced emphatically, without being a useless doll.
On a more critical note, in my opinion, The Politics of Distinction could have profited from a more elaborate theorizing of central notions such as Pareto's sentimento or of the subjunctive mood that characterizes the activities of both elites, as I take these aspirations and hopes (and disappointments and frustrations) to be the most promising avenue for contemporary research on elites and politics in Africa in general.
He focuses on four plays each in chapters on Ibsen: the buried secret and the big surprise, Chekhov: life in the subjunctive mood, and Strindberg: isles of the dead.
It is present tense, sometimes, when tamed, in a subjunctive mood.
Bacon used the subjunctive for a simple reason: the verb in the preface to the Great Instauration appears in a subordinate clause introduced by the conjunction cum, which can be causal or explanatory ('because' or 'since') only if its verb is in the subjunctive mood, and will otherwise be temporal ('when,' 'while,' etc.
He told co-writer Bieber, 22, the lyric "If I was your boyfriend" had "clearly used the subjunctive mood incorrectly" and "the correct lyrics should, in fact, be 'If I were your boyfriend'.
In Middle and early Modern English, on the other hand, verbs are regularly found in the subjunctive mood in conditional protases (Rissanen 1999: 308; Fischer 1992: 349-50).
But in the same passages, Atreides and Lopez employ the subjunctive mood.
The exercises in the grammar manual consist of more traditional activities in which students have the opportunity to review those grammar concepts that are more problematic to learners, such as the verbs "ser and estar," verbal tenses (preterit and imperfect), the subjunctive mood, prepositions and conjunctions, etc.
When exceptive conditionals are combined with a subjunctive mood a dual representation is predicted, while when exceptive conditionals are combined with an indicative mood, the prediction is for a single representation.