suboptimization


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suboptimization

(ˌsʌbɒptɪmaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

suboptimisation

n
1. a situation which is less than optimal
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the optimization of an organization's subunits
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, we iteratively determine the optimal values in single variable suboptimization problems that are decoupled from the original problem in terms of l, [alpha], [beta], [lambda], and p.
After the complete process is better understood, commonsense improvements that identify suboptimization, eliminate unnecessary or duplicate effort, and better manage process flow will become evident.
It should be noted that suboptimization objectives selected should be conflicting.
The more a cost-imposition calculus expands beyond suboptimization of a specific contest, the more hardship differential becomes less relevant than which nation has the best overall strategy.
Functional specialization among firms also eliminates the inefficiencies of interfunctional suboptimization within a firm.
The longer the distribution channel, the greater the potential for "peaks" of suboptimization, inaccurate or insufficient information along the chain, inefficiencies, and higher operating costs (Anderson, Fine & Parker, 2000).
In fact, no transfer-price scheme will really solve the suboptimization problem.
Failure to integrate contracting with all of the three primary pillars will result in suboptimization or outright contract support and/or mission failure (Yoder, 2010).
Suboptimization can be understood as failing to recognize the wholeness and connectedness of a system (Hutchins, 1996).
Another important advantage of LCA is that it includes all related processes, and studies an entire product system, hence, avoiding the suboptimization that could result if only a single process were the focus of the study.
Simply doing the best for individual components amounts to suboptimization and results in losses to everybody in the system.
This is especially important to avoid suboptimization, caused by adversarial relationships between supply chain members pursuing different targets that are not necessarily aligned with the final customer's needs (Hassan 2006).