subordinate clause


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Related to subordinate clause: subordinate conjunction, complex sentence

subordinate clause

subordinate clause

n
(Grammar) grammar a clause with an adjectival, adverbial, or nominal function, rather than one that functions as a separate sentence in its own right. Compare coordinate clause, main clause

subor′dinate clause′


n.
a clause that modifies the principal clause or some part of it or that serves a noun function in the principal clause, as when she arrived in the sentence I was there when she arrived or that she has arrived in the sentence I doubt that she has arrived. Compare main clause.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subordinate clause - a clause in a complex sentence that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence and that functions within the sentence as a noun or adjective or adverb
complex sentence - a sentence composed of at least one main clause and one subordinate clause
clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
restrictive clause - a subordinate clause that limits or restricts the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
descriptive clause, nonrestrictive clause - a subordinate clause that does not limit or restrict the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
Translations
podřadné souvětí
bisætning
sivulause
alárendelt mellékmondatalárendelt mondat
aukasetning
bijzin
podraďovacia veta
yan cümlecik

subordinate clause

n (Gram) → Nebensatz m

subordinate

(səˈboːdinət) adjective
lower in rank, power, importance etc. A colonel is subordinate to a brigadier.
noun
a person who is subordinate. to give orders to one's subordinates.
subordinate clause
a clause introduced in a sentence by a conjunction etc, and acting as a noun, adjective or adverb. I don't know who she is; The book that's on the table is mine; She's crying because you were unkind.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, the semantic criteria for subjunctive use in the subordinate clause needs to refer to potential future events as seen in example
So too is its constant self-interruption--there's barely an idea raised that isn't equipped with a qualifier, subordinate clause, or humorous footnote: "Bacherlorhood is a two-edged sword (but so are most swords, surely?
But locating Islam's contemporary mainstream is not a simple task, and cannot be accomplished in the subordinate clause of a Times op-ed piece.
I could spot only a few: "breath" (page 2) should have been "breadth," "the life" (64) should have been "life," "two" (134) should have been "three," "New" (190) should have been "News," "however" (173) should have been preceded by a comma, and a comma is missing after the subordinate clause of the first sentence in the first paragraph on page 13.
Oliver gives a list of these potentially archaic syntactic features in the conclusion of her study: (1) While in AEthelberht the mood of the verb in the subordinate clause (or protasis) is regularly indicative, in AElfred's code the mood is subjunctive; (2) The position of the verb in the main clause (or apodosis) is consistently final in AEthelberht, and always initial in the laws of AElfred; (3) A pronoun in a subordinate clause of AEthelberht tends not to be reiterated in the main clause, as it is in AElfredian legislation; (4) The auxiliary verb of the passive is almost always weordan in AEthelberht, but beon in AElfred.
Backs in to the lead with along, busy subordinate clause, thereby delaying the subject.
He manages to shoehorn in a subordinate clause about Orwell, "who passed along to the British secret police the names of people he suspected of being Communists or fellow travelers.
The insertion of this announcement within a subordinate clause suggests that Brent again wants to suppress, even as she reveals, the fact of her condition.
In the Latin, however, each sentence is really a subordinate clause referring to what was stated up to that point.
In the Bradley reference, for example, the misplaced modifier - "that affected his ability to move the right side of his body" - was a subordinate clause.
The commandment to love your neighbor as yourself (Leviticus 19:18) is not a subordinate clause in the Holiness Code but is heavily stressed as the center of a complex concentric structure.
The subordinate clause [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is translated as "`Be' and `not be' belong, on this view, to the things predicated immediately of some things, in which case they become as much parts of the propositions as the subjects are.