subside

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sub·side

 (səb-sīd′)
intr.v. sub·sid·ed, sub·sid·ing, sub·sides
1.
a. To become less intense, active, or severe; abate.
b. To become smaller or less prominent, as swelling. See Synonyms at decrease.
2. To move or sink to a lower or normal level: The earth subsided as the aquifer drained away.
3. To sink to the bottom, as a sediment.
4. To sit down slowly; settle down: "She looked swiftly around, and once she saw her husband, subsided primly onto the edge of a chair" (Jane Stevenson).

[Latin subsīdere : sub-, sub- + sīdere, to settle; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·si′dence (səb-sīd′ns, sŭb′sĭ-dns) n.

subside

(səbˈsaɪd)
vb (intr)
1. to become less loud, excited, violent, etc; abate
2. to sink or fall to a lower level
3. (Physical Geography) (of the surface of the earth, etc) to cave in; collapse
4. (of sediment, etc) to sink or descend to the bottom; settle
[C17: from Latin subsīdere to settle down, from sub- down + sīdere to settle]
subˈsider n

sub•side

(səbˈsaɪd)

v.i. -sid•ed, -sid•ing.
1. to sink to a low or lower level.
2. to become quiet, less active, or less violent; abate.
3. to sink or fall to the bottom, as sediment; settle; precipitate.
[1640–50; < Latin subsīdere=sub- sub- + sīdere to sit, settle; akin to sedēre to be seated; see sit]
sub•sid•ence (səbˈsaɪd ns, ˈsʌb sɪ dns) n.

subside


Past participle: subsided
Gerund: subsiding

Imperative
subside
subside
Present
I subside
you subside
he/she/it subsides
we subside
you subside
they subside
Preterite
I subsided
you subsided
he/she/it subsided
we subsided
you subsided
they subsided
Present Continuous
I am subsiding
you are subsiding
he/she/it is subsiding
we are subsiding
you are subsiding
they are subsiding
Present Perfect
I have subsided
you have subsided
he/she/it has subsided
we have subsided
you have subsided
they have subsided
Past Continuous
I was subsiding
you were subsiding
he/she/it was subsiding
we were subsiding
you were subsiding
they were subsiding
Past Perfect
I had subsided
you had subsided
he/she/it had subsided
we had subsided
you had subsided
they had subsided
Future
I will subside
you will subside
he/she/it will subside
we will subside
you will subside
they will subside
Future Perfect
I will have subsided
you will have subsided
he/she/it will have subsided
we will have subsided
you will have subsided
they will have subsided
Future Continuous
I will be subsiding
you will be subsiding
he/she/it will be subsiding
we will be subsiding
you will be subsiding
they will be subsiding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been subsiding
you have been subsiding
he/she/it has been subsiding
we have been subsiding
you have been subsiding
they have been subsiding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been subsiding
you will have been subsiding
he/she/it will have been subsiding
we will have been subsiding
you will have been subsiding
they will have been subsiding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been subsiding
you had been subsiding
he/she/it had been subsiding
we had been subsiding
you had been subsiding
they had been subsiding
Conditional
I would subside
you would subside
he/she/it would subside
we would subside
you would subside
they would subside
Past Conditional
I would have subsided
you would have subsided
he/she/it would have subsided
we would have subsided
you would have subsided
they would have subsided
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.subside - wear off or die down; "The pain subsided"
weaken - become weaker; "The prisoner's resistance weakened after seven days"
2.subside - sink to a lower level or form a depression; "the valleys subside"
sink, dip - appear to move downward; "The sun dipped below the horizon"; "The setting sun sank below the tree line"
3.subside - sink down or precipitate; "the mud subsides when the waters become calm"
go under, go down, sink, settle - go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"
4.subside - descend into or as if into some soft substance or place; "He sank into bed"; "She subsided into the chair"
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"

subside

verb
2. collapse, sink, cave in, drop, lower, settle Does that mean that the whole house is subsiding?
3. drop, fall, decline, ebb, descend Local officials say the flood waters have subsided.

subside

verb
To become or cause to become less active or intense:
abate, bate, die (away, down, off, or out), ease (off or up), ebb, fall, fall off, lapse, let up, moderate, remit, slacken, slack off, wane.
Translations
يَنْخَفِض، يَنْحَسِريهْبُط، يَنْخَفِضيَهْدأ، يَسْكُن، يَخِف
opadnoutsesedat seutišit se
stilne afsynke
leapad
ganga niîurhjaînasíga
grimztinuščiūtinusėdimassmegti
atplūstiegrimtkristiesnorimtsēsties
opadnúťsadnúť
batmakçekilmekçökmekdinmekhafiflemek

subside

[səbˈsaɪd] VI [floods] → bajar, descender; [road, land, house] → hundirse; [wind] → amainar; [anger, laughter, excitement] → apagarse; [threat] → disminuir, alejarse; [violence, pain] → disminuir
to subside into a chairdejarse caer en una silla

subside

[səbˈsaɪd] vi
(= go down) [flood, waters] → baisser
(= calm down) [storm, wind] → s'apaiser; [fear, pain] → s'apaiser
(= sink) [land, earth, building] → s'affaisser

subside

vi
(flood, river)sinken; (land, building, road)sich senken, absacken (inf); the lorry subsided into the mudder Lastwagen sank im Schlamm ein; to subside into a chairauf einen Stuhl sinken
(storm, wind)abflauen, nachlassen, sich legen; (anger, excitement, laughter, noise)nachlassen, abklingen; (fever)sinken

subside

[səbˈsaɪd] vi (flood) → calare, decrescere; (road, land) → cedere, avvallarsi; (wind, anger) → calmarsi, placarsi

subside

(səbˈsaid) verb
1. (of land, streets, buildings etc) to sink lower. When a building starts to subside, cracks usually appear in the walls.
2. (of floods) to become lower and withdraw. Gradually the water subsided.
3. (of a storm, noise or other disturbance) to become quieter. They stayed anchored in harbour till the wind subsided.
subsidence (ˈsabsidəns) , ((American) səbˈsaidəns) noun
the process of subsiding. The road has had to be closed because of subsidence.

subside

vt. menguar, apaciguar, bajar, cesar.
References in classic literature ?
The four railways from Philadelphia and Washington, Harrisburg and Wheeling, which converge at Baltimore, whirled away the heterogeneous population to the four corners of the United States, and the city subsided into comparative tranquility.
It has been stated that the land subsided during this memorable shock: I could not discover any proof of this; yet it seems far from improbable, for the form of the coast must certainly have undergone some change since the foundation of the old town; as no people in their senses would willingly have chosen for their building place, the narrow spit of shingle on which the ruins now stand.
Hence we may safely conclude, that within the Indo-human period there has been an elevation, as before alluded to, of more than eighty-five feet; for some little elevation must have been lost by the coast having subsided since the old maps were engraved.
Thus the Prince with great dignity and perfect good nature, while Archie looked modestly gratified with the flattering opinions of his kinsfolk, and Steve subsided, feeling he had done his duty as a cousin and a brother.
Of course, this elevated state of things could not endure long, but it was very nice while it lasted, and left an excellent effect upon the minds of all when the first ardour had subsided.
There are nearly as many Elliotts and Crawfords," said Doctor Dave, after the laughter had subsided.
After the second day the sea subsided slowly to a glassy calm.
And he painfully subsided into the little boat, which started, favored by wind and tide, for the coast of France.
There was a rustling among the crowd and it again subsided, so that Pierre distinctly heard the pleasantly human voice of the Emperor saying with emotion:
As he neither spoke nor moved, however, the sensation created by his appearance soon subsided, and then every eye was again turned upon the speaker, and every ear once more drunk in the intoxication of his maddening appeals.
Her own attachment had really subsided into a mere nothing; it was not worth thinking of; but if he, who had undoubtedly been always so much the most in love of the two, were to be returning with the same warmth of sentiment which he had taken away, it would be very distressing.
The sensation produced by the presence of the strangers had not in the least subsided at the period of our arrival at the islands.