subsidence


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sub·side

 (səb-sīd′)
intr.v. sub·sid·ed, sub·sid·ing, sub·sides
1.
a. To become less intense, active, or severe; abate.
b. To become smaller or less prominent, as swelling. See Synonyms at decrease.
2. To move or sink to a lower or normal level: The earth subsided as the aquifer drained away.
3. To sink to the bottom, as a sediment.
4. To sit down slowly; settle down: "She looked swiftly around, and once she saw her husband, subsided primly onto the edge of a chair" (Jane Stevenson).

[Latin subsīdere : sub-, sub- + sīdere, to settle; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·si′dence (səb-sīd′ns, sŭb′sĭ-dns) n.

subsidence

(səbˈsaɪdəns; ˈsʌbsɪdəns) or

subsidency

n
1. the act or process of subsiding or the condition of having subsided
2. (Geological Science) geology the gradual sinking of landforms to a lower level as a result of earth movements, mining operations, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subsidence - an abatement in intensity or degree (as in the manifestations of a disease); "his cancer is in remission"
abatement, hiatus, reprieve, respite, suspension - an interruption in the intensity or amount of something
resolution - the subsidence of swelling or other signs of inflammation (especially in a lung)
2.subsidence - a gradual sinking to a lower level
sinking - a descent as through liquid (especially through water); "they still talk about the sinking of the Titanic"
3.subsidence - the sudden collapse of something into a hollow beneath it
collapse - a natural event caused by something suddenly falling down or caving in; "the roof is in danger of collapse"; "the collapse of the old star under its own gravity"

subsidence

noun sinking, settling, collapse, settlement The problems were caused by subsidence.

subsidence

noun
The act or process of becoming less active or intense:
Translations
هُبوط، إنْخِساف، سُكون، هُمود
sesedání
nedsynkningsammenskridning
süllyedéssüppedés
sig
pokles pôdy
batmaçökme

subsidence

[səbˈsaɪdəns] N [of road, land, house] → hundimiento m; [of floods] → bajada f, descenso m
"road liable to subsidence"firme en mal estado

subsidence

[ˈsʌbsɪdəns səbˈsaɪdəns] naffaissement m

subsidence

nSenkung f, → Absacken nt (inf); there’s a lot of subsidence in the areain der Gegend senkt sich das Erdreich; “danger: subsidenceAchtung: Bodensenkung; we can’t get a mortgage because of the subsidencewir bekommen keine Hypothek, weil sich das Gelände senkt

subsidence

[səbˈsaɪdns] n (of land) → cedimento, avvallamento; (of waters) → abbassamento

subside

(səbˈsaid) verb
1. (of land, streets, buildings etc) to sink lower. When a building starts to subside, cracks usually appear in the walls.
2. (of floods) to become lower and withdraw. Gradually the water subsided.
3. (of a storm, noise or other disturbance) to become quieter. They stayed anchored in harbour till the wind subsided.
subsidence (ˈsabsidəns) , ((American) səbˈsaidəns) noun
the process of subsiding. The road has had to be closed because of subsidence.
References in classic literature ?
He delighted in the swell and subsidence of the rhythm, and the happily recurring rhyme.
Under the influence of a great mental and moral upheaval, his character and his habits had taken on the appearance of complete change, but after a while with the subsidence of the storm, both began to settle toward their former places.
But now every sound ceased suddenly, with the subsidence of Mr.
Just before day, we were all somewhat alarmed at some odd noises and concussions in the balloon, accompanied with the apparent rapid subsidence of the whole machine.
The creatures had crept downwards with the subsidence of the rick till they were all together at the bottom, and being now uncovered from their last refuge they ran across the open ground in all directions, a loud shriek from the by-this-time half-tipsy Marian informing her companions that one of the rats had invaded her person--a terror which the rest of the women had guarded against by various schemes of skirt-tucking and self-elevation.
With the subsidence of Esmeralda the lioness renewed her efforts to wriggle her huge bulk through the weakening lattice.
In the nature of a warm-hearted woman, this was only the inevitable reaction which followed the subsidence of anxiety about the girl, after her own resolution had set that anxiety at rest.
When converted by subsidence into large separate islands, there will still exist many individuals of the same species on each island: intercrossing on the confines of the range of each species will thus be checked: after physical changes of any kind, immigration will be prevented, so that new places in the polity of each island will have to be filled up by modifications of the old inhabitants; and time will be allowed for the varieties in each to become well modified and perfected.
The beds including the above fossil remains, stand only from fifteen to twenty feet above the level of high-water; and hence the elevation of the land has been small (without there has been an intercalated period of subsidence, of which we have no evidence) since the great quadrupeds wandered over the surrounding plains; and the external features of the country must then have been very nearly the same as now.
When this bar is gradually increased by storms, tides, or currents, or there is a subsidence of the waters, so that it reaches to the surface, that which was at first but an inclination in the shore in which a thought was harbored becomes an individual lake, cut off from the ocean, wherein the thought secures its own conditions -- changes, perhaps, from salt to fresh, becomes a sweet sea, dead sea, or a marsh.
And he himself sank with so earth-shaking a subsidence that he broke a big rose-tree with his body and shook up into the sky a cloud of red earth--like the smoke of some heathen sacrifice.
Avoid picking sand and gravel in upstream areas and within the range of subsidence due to the negative effect of these harvesting in feeding groundwater aquifer