subside

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sub·side

 (səb-sīd′)
intr.v. sub·sid·ed, sub·sid·ing, sub·sides
1.
a. To become less intense, active, or severe; abate.
b. To become smaller or less prominent, as swelling. See Synonyms at decrease.
2. To move or sink to a lower or normal level: The earth subsided as the aquifer drained away.
3. To sink to the bottom, as a sediment.
4. To sit down slowly; settle down: "She looked swiftly around, and once she saw her husband, subsided primly onto the edge of a chair" (Jane Stevenson).

[Latin subsīdere : sub-, sub- + sīdere, to settle; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·si′dence (səb-sīd′ns, sŭb′sĭ-dns) n.

subside

(səbˈsaɪd)
vb (intr)
1. to become less loud, excited, violent, etc; abate
2. to sink or fall to a lower level
3. (Physical Geography) (of the surface of the earth, etc) to cave in; collapse
4. (of sediment, etc) to sink or descend to the bottom; settle
[C17: from Latin subsīdere to settle down, from sub- down + sīdere to settle]
subˈsider n

sub•side

(səbˈsaɪd)

v.i. -sid•ed, -sid•ing.
1. to sink to a low or lower level.
2. to become quiet, less active, or less violent; abate.
3. to sink or fall to the bottom, as sediment; settle; precipitate.
[1640–50; < Latin subsīdere=sub- sub- + sīdere to sit, settle; akin to sedēre to be seated; see sit]
sub•sid•ence (səbˈsaɪd ns, ˈsʌb sɪ dns) n.

subside


Past participle: subsided
Gerund: subsiding

Imperative
subside
subside
Present
I subside
you subside
he/she/it subsides
we subside
you subside
they subside
Preterite
I subsided
you subsided
he/she/it subsided
we subsided
you subsided
they subsided
Present Continuous
I am subsiding
you are subsiding
he/she/it is subsiding
we are subsiding
you are subsiding
they are subsiding
Present Perfect
I have subsided
you have subsided
he/she/it has subsided
we have subsided
you have subsided
they have subsided
Past Continuous
I was subsiding
you were subsiding
he/she/it was subsiding
we were subsiding
you were subsiding
they were subsiding
Past Perfect
I had subsided
you had subsided
he/she/it had subsided
we had subsided
you had subsided
they had subsided
Future
I will subside
you will subside
he/she/it will subside
we will subside
you will subside
they will subside
Future Perfect
I will have subsided
you will have subsided
he/she/it will have subsided
we will have subsided
you will have subsided
they will have subsided
Future Continuous
I will be subsiding
you will be subsiding
he/she/it will be subsiding
we will be subsiding
you will be subsiding
they will be subsiding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been subsiding
you have been subsiding
he/she/it has been subsiding
we have been subsiding
you have been subsiding
they have been subsiding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been subsiding
you will have been subsiding
he/she/it will have been subsiding
we will have been subsiding
you will have been subsiding
they will have been subsiding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been subsiding
you had been subsiding
he/she/it had been subsiding
we had been subsiding
you had been subsiding
they had been subsiding
Conditional
I would subside
you would subside
he/she/it would subside
we would subside
you would subside
they would subside
Past Conditional
I would have subsided
you would have subsided
he/she/it would have subsided
we would have subsided
you would have subsided
they would have subsided
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.subside - wear off or die down; "The pain subsided"
weaken - become weaker; "The prisoner's resistance weakened after seven days"
2.subside - sink to a lower level or form a depression; "the valleys subside"
sink, dip - appear to move downward; "The sun dipped below the horizon"; "The setting sun sank below the tree line"
3.subside - sink down or precipitate; "the mud subsides when the waters become calm"
go under, go down, sink, settle - go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"
4.subside - descend into or as if into some soft substance or place; "He sank into bed"; "She subsided into the chair"
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"

subside

verb
2. collapse, sink, cave in, drop, lower, settle Does that mean that the whole house is subsiding?
3. drop, fall, decline, ebb, descend Local officials say the flood waters have subsided.

subside

verb
To become or cause to become less active or intense:
abate, bate, die (away, down, off, or out), ease (off or up), ebb, fall, fall off, lapse, let up, moderate, remit, slacken, slack off, wane.
Translations
يَنْخَفِض، يَنْحَسِريهْبُط، يَنْخَفِضيَهْدأ، يَسْكُن، يَخِف
opadnoutsesedat seutišit se
stilne afsynke
leapad
ganga niîurhjaînasíga
grimztinuščiūtinusėdimassmegti
atplūstiegrimtkristiesnorimtsēsties
opadnúťsadnúť
batmakçekilmekçökmekdinmekhafiflemek

subside

[səbˈsaɪd] VI [floods] → bajar, descender; [road, land, house] → hundirse; [wind] → amainar; [anger, laughter, excitement] → apagarse; [threat] → disminuir, alejarse; [violence, pain] → disminuir
to subside into a chairdejarse caer en una silla

subside

[səbˈsaɪd] vi
(= go down) [flood, waters] → baisser
(= calm down) [storm, wind] → s'apaiser; [fear, pain] → s'apaiser
(= sink) [land, earth, building] → s'affaisser

subside

vi
(flood, river)sinken; (land, building, road)sich senken, absacken (inf); the lorry subsided into the mudder Lastwagen sank im Schlamm ein; to subside into a chairauf einen Stuhl sinken
(storm, wind)abflauen, nachlassen, sich legen; (anger, excitement, laughter, noise)nachlassen, abklingen; (fever)sinken

subside

[səbˈsaɪd] vi (flood) → calare, decrescere; (road, land) → cedere, avvallarsi; (wind, anger) → calmarsi, placarsi

subside

(səbˈsaid) verb
1. (of land, streets, buildings etc) to sink lower. When a building starts to subside, cracks usually appear in the walls.
2. (of floods) to become lower and withdraw. Gradually the water subsided.
3. (of a storm, noise or other disturbance) to become quieter. They stayed anchored in harbour till the wind subsided.
subsidence (ˈsabsidəns) , ((American) səbˈsaidəns) noun
the process of subsiding. The road has had to be closed because of subsidence.

subside

vt. menguar, apaciguar, bajar, cesar.
References in classic literature ?
When, in consequence of heavy rains up-country, a river which you wish to ford is swollen and flecked with foam, you must wait until it subsides.
In the spring, when the streams are swollen by rain and by the melting of the snows, the lake rises several feet above its ordinary level during the summer, it gradually subsides again, leaving a sparkling zone of the finest salt upon its shores.
The alarming presence, however, gradually subsides into its chair and falls to smoking in long puffs, consoling itself with the philosophical reflection, "The name of your friend in the city begins with a D, comrade, and you're about right respecting the bond.
In this way, the early months of marriage often are times of critical tumult--whether that of a shrimp-pool or of deeper waters--which afterwards subsides into cheerful peace.
It will be much more convenient to discuss this question in the chapter on the Imperfection of the geological record; and I will here only state that I believe the answer mainly lies in the record being incomparably less perfect than is generally supposed; the imperfection of the record being chiefly due to organic beings not inhabiting profound depths of the sea, and to their remains being embedded and preserved to a future age only in masses of sediment sufficiently thick and extensive to withstand an enormous amount of future degradation; and such fossiliferous masses can be accumulated only where much sediment is deposited on the shallow bed of the sea, whilst it slowly subsides.
The mud which passes from the mills is collected into pools, where it subsides, and every now and then is cleared out, and thrown into a common heap.
It is no blame to them that after marriage this Sehnsucht nach der Liebe subsides.
Tope is again highly entertained, and, having fallen into respectful convulsions of laughter, subsides into a deferential murmur, importing that surely any gentleman would deem it a pleasure and an honour to have his neck broken, in return for such a compliment from such a source.
Unless my face, when I am dead, subsides into the long departed look--they say such things happen, I don't know--my children will have never seen me.
A bound, a splash, a brief struggle; there is an eddy for an instant, it gradually subsides into a gentle ripple; the waters have closed above your head, and the world has closed upon your miseries and misfortunes for ever.
A moment was allowed for the first thrill to subside, then Hugo, the villain, stalked in with a clanking sword at his side, a slouching hat, black beard, mysterious cloak, and the boots.
Their affection was always to subside into friendship.