subsist


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Related to subsist: vagrant

sub·sist

 (səb-sĭst′)
v. sub·sist·ed, sub·sist·ing, sub·sists
v.intr.
1.
a. To exist; be.
b. To remain or continue in existence.
2. To maintain life; live: subsisted on one meal a day.
3. To be logically conceivable.
v.tr.
To maintain or support with provisions.

[Latin subsistere, to support : sub-, sub- + sistere, to stand; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·sist′er n.

subsist

(səbˈsɪst)
vb (mainly intr)
1. (often foll by on) to be sustained; manage to live: to subsist on milk.
2. to continue in existence
3. (foll by in) to lie or reside by virtue (of); consist
4. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. to exist as a concept or relation rather than a fact
b. to be conceivable
5. (tr) obsolete to provide with support
[C16: from Latin subsistere to stand firm, from sub- up + sistere to make a stand]
subˈsistent adj
subˈsister n

sub•sist

(səbˈsɪst)

v.i.
1. to exist; continue in existence.
2. to remain alive; live, as on food, resources, etc.
3. to have existence in, or by reason of, something.
4. to reside, lie, or consist (usu. fol. by in).
v.t.
5. to provide sustenance or support for; maintain.
[1540–50; < Latin subsistere to remain =sub- sub- + sistere to stand, make stand; see stand]
sub•sist′ing•ly, adv.

subsist


Past participle: subsisted
Gerund: subsisting

Imperative
subsist
subsist
Present
I subsist
you subsist
he/she/it subsists
we subsist
you subsist
they subsist
Preterite
I subsisted
you subsisted
he/she/it subsisted
we subsisted
you subsisted
they subsisted
Present Continuous
I am subsisting
you are subsisting
he/she/it is subsisting
we are subsisting
you are subsisting
they are subsisting
Present Perfect
I have subsisted
you have subsisted
he/she/it has subsisted
we have subsisted
you have subsisted
they have subsisted
Past Continuous
I was subsisting
you were subsisting
he/she/it was subsisting
we were subsisting
you were subsisting
they were subsisting
Past Perfect
I had subsisted
you had subsisted
he/she/it had subsisted
we had subsisted
you had subsisted
they had subsisted
Future
I will subsist
you will subsist
he/she/it will subsist
we will subsist
you will subsist
they will subsist
Future Perfect
I will have subsisted
you will have subsisted
he/she/it will have subsisted
we will have subsisted
you will have subsisted
they will have subsisted
Future Continuous
I will be subsisting
you will be subsisting
he/she/it will be subsisting
we will be subsisting
you will be subsisting
they will be subsisting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been subsisting
you have been subsisting
he/she/it has been subsisting
we have been subsisting
you have been subsisting
they have been subsisting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been subsisting
you will have been subsisting
he/she/it will have been subsisting
we will have been subsisting
you will have been subsisting
they will have been subsisting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been subsisting
you had been subsisting
he/she/it had been subsisting
we had been subsisting
you had been subsisting
they had been subsisting
Conditional
I would subsist
you would subsist
he/she/it would subsist
we would subsist
you would subsist
they would subsist
Past Conditional
I would have subsisted
you would have subsisted
he/she/it would have subsisted
we would have subsisted
you would have subsisted
they would have subsisted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.subsist - support oneself; "he could barely exist on such a low wage"; "Can you live on $2000 a month in New York City?"; "Many people in the world have to subsist on $1 a day"
breathe - be alive; "Every creature that breathes"
freewheel, drift - live unhurriedly, irresponsibly, or freely; "My son drifted around for years in California before going to law school"
live on, survive, last, live, endure, hold out, hold up, go - continue to live through hardship or adversity; "We went without water and food for 3 days"; "These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America"; "The race car driver lived through several very serious accidents"; "how long can a person last without food and water?"

subsist

verb stay alive, survive, keep going, make ends meet, last, live, continue, exist, endure, eke out an existence, keep your head above water, sustain yourself Almost every employee must moonlight simply to subsist.

subsist

verb
1. To have being or actuality:
2. To have reality or life:
3. To maintain existence in a certain way:
Translations

subsist

[səbˈsɪst] VIsubsistir
to subsist on sthsubsistir a base de algo

subsist

[səbˈsɪst] visubsister
to subsist on sth → subsister avec qch

subsist

vi (form)sich ernähren, leben (on von)

subsist

[səbˈsɪst] vi to subsist on sthvivere di qc

subsist

vi. subsistir, sobrevivir.
References in classic literature ?
The same quality, moreover, is said to subsist in a thing in varying degrees at different times.
Now the same relation which subsists between primary substance and everything else subsists also between the species and the genus: for the species is to the genus as subject is to predicate, since the genus is predicated of the species, whereas the species cannot be predicated of the genus.
This done, Captain Bonneville made a distribution of his forces: twenty men were to remain with him in garrison to protect the property; the rest were organized into three brigades, and sent off in different directions, to subsist themselves by hunting the buffalo, until the snow should become too deep.
A more forlorn set they had never encountered: they had not a morsel of meat or fish; nor anything to subsist on, excepting roots, wild rosebuds, the barks of certain plants, and other vegetable production; neither had they any weapon for hunting or defence, excepting an old spear: yet the poor fellows made no murmur nor complaint; but seemed accustomed to their hard fare.
For which reason a mutual utility and friendship may subsist between the master and the slave, I mean when they are placed by nature in that relation to each other, for the contrary takes place amongst those who are reduced to slavery by the law, or by conquest.
I had indeed another bank bill about me of #30, which was the whole of what I brought with me, as well to subsist on in the country, as not knowing what might offer; because this creature, the go-between that had thus betrayed us both, had made me believe strange things of my marrying to my advantage in the country, and I was not willing to be without money, whatever might happen.
I was very sorry to tell him that the little I had would not subsist us; that it was not sufficient to subsist me alone in the south country, and that this was the reason that made me put myself into the hands of that woman who called him brother, she having assured me that I might board very handsomely at a town called Manchester, where I had not yet been, for about #6 a year; and my whole income not being about #15 a year, I thought I might live easy upon it, and wait for better things.
That though the pleasures arising from such pure love may be heightened and sweetened by the assistance of amorous desires, yet the former can subsist alone, nor are they destroyed by the intervention of the latter.
What relation is to subsist between the nine or more States ratifying the Constitution, and the remaining few who do not become parties to it?
In general, it may be observed, that although no political relation can subsist between the assenting and dissenting States, yet the moral relations will remain uncancelled.
And since in this famous fishery, each mate or headsman, like a Gothic Knight of old, is always accompanied by his boat-steerer or harpooneer, who in certain conjunctures provides him with a fresh lance, when the former one has been badly twisted, or elbowed in the assault; and moreover, as there generally subsists between the two, a close intimacy and friendliness; it is therefore but meet, that in this place we set down who the Pequod's harpooneers were, and to what headsman each of them belonged.
The sense of security more frequently springs from habit than from conviction, and for this reason it often subsists after such a change in the conditions as might have been expected to suggest alarm.