substantialism

(redirected from substantialist)
Related to substantialist: Substantialism

substantialism

(səbˈstænʃəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the doctrine that a substantial reality underlies phenomena
2. (Philosophy) the doctrine that matter is a real substance
subˈstantialist n
References in periodicals archive ?
He develops this concept to avoid a substantialist notion of being, such as within phenomenology, privileging rather the subject's formation through its relation to language.
to resist by all means available our primary inclination to think the world in a substantialist manner .
Cassirer comprehends that the new science built by Galileo is based on a different way of conceiving both abstraction and the formation of scientific concepts: in this respect it was essential to move from a substantialist conception to a functional one.
His understanding of a person from a substantialist perspective becomes obvious when he formulates the purpose of human beings: their purpose is that existence (Dasein (4)) approaches its essence (Wesen) (Frankl, 2005: p 199).
We shall start with the substantialist theory, which affirms "a static vision of identity, accentuating biological, social, or historical traits".
The metaphysical ideas that emerged were not traditional metaphysics based solely on a substantialist perspective, he says, but were concerned and interested in the effects of an enduring philosophical critique, and operated according to the standards of modernity.
Though sometimes rendered "noumenon" (Cleary Entry) or "absolute" (Cook), both terms with substantialist and idealist overtones, Gregory's choice of "principle"--a choice also endorsed by Gimello ("Apophatic," "Chih-yen") and Zurcher--may be more appropriate if li is in fact none other than dependent origination, emptiness, or impermanence; i.
Brubaker proposes a "cognitive turn in the study of groups in order to avoid "analytical groupism" (a tendency to conceptualize racial, ethnic, and national groups in substantialist terms): "Race, ethnicity, and nationality exist and are reproduced from day to day in and through such perceptions, interpretations, representations, classifications, categorizations, and identifications" (Brubaker 2009, 39).
For if the reference to the pudgala can certainly be interpreted in nearly substantialist terms (as the Pudgalavadins and several modern interpreters did), the ambiguous way in which this reference is introduced (iti sydd vacaniyam (21)) as well as the recourse to the parvanivasnusmrti formula can no less certainly be taken as a warning against such an interpretation and as emphasizing the very conventionality of the pudgala alluded to (as the "mainstream" Buddhist scholars did).
Part 2 raises the formal issues of substantialist and situational discourses on the sacred, drawing from Chidester and Linenthal's genealogy of sacred lands in America.
The first, called substantialist, is associated with Friedman (and Freyssenet but also with the neoclassical economists.
Moreover, Leibniz seemed to find in the trinitarian conception of god, conceptual resources for an alternative conception of the mind to that of Spinoza--an approach that was, like his approach to space and time--fundamentally relational rather than substantialist.