substernal


Also found in: Medical.

substernal

(sʌbˈstɜːnəl)
adj
(Anatomy) anatomy below the sternum or breastbone
Translations

sub·ster·nal

a. subesternal, debajo del esternón.
References in periodicals archive ?
A 41-year-old man presented to our emergency department with complaints of constant substernal left chest pain radiating to his left shoulder that began a few hours prior to presentation.
We also found that an incision in this range allows for paratracheal neck dissections and the removal of nodes and substernal glands.
The morning after surgery, the patient denied abdominal complaints, but reported a sore throat and substernal chest pain; palpation did not reproduce this pain, but did elicit crepitus at the neck.
Although having radiating chest pain to a region besides substernal or left precordium or presence of preinfarction angina did not differ between groups, in agreement to the previous studies, the patients who used ambulance defined more severe chest pain (6, 7).
Throughout the test and the recovery period, the patient is carefully observed for signs and symptoms of cardiovascular compromise such as substernal chest pain or other angina symptoms, lightheadedness, pallor, nausea or sudden, unusual sweating or fatigue.
In some moderately severe cases, there was an exaggerated response to injection of adrenalin, including tachycardia, substernal oppression, nausea, and vomiting.
However, chest symptoms in women are more likely to be described as an aching or pressure and less often as crushing substernal pain.
Similarly, the most common presenting symptoms of patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy are abrupt onset of severe substernal chest pain, acute dyspnea, ST segment elevation and hypotension.
A 51-year-old woman with a history of mild hypertension and mild hyperlipidemia had presented with a 2-h episode of substernal chest discomfort for the first time.
Many more women than men have subtle symptoms without the classic deep substernal chest pain.
When a cardiac event does occur, one of the difficulties women have in discerning the presence of a myocardial infarction is that the "typical" cardiac symptom of severe crushing substernal chest pain often is not the presenting symptom in women.