substratum

(redirected from substrata)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to substrata: superstratum

sub·stra·tum

(sŭb′strā′təm, -străt′əm)
n. pl. sub·stra·ta (-strā′tə, -străt′ə) or sub·stra·tums
1.
a. An underlying layer.
b. A layer of earth beneath the surface soil; subsoil.
2. A foundation or groundwork.
3. The material on which another material is coated or fabricated.
4. Philosophy The underlying characterless substance that supports attributes of material reality.
5. Biology A substrate.
6. Linguistics A substrate.

[New Latin substrātum, from neuter of Latin substrātus, past participle of substernere, to lay under : sub-, sub- + sternere, to stretch, spread; see ster-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

sub·stra′tive adj.

substratum

(sʌbˈstrɑːtəm; -ˈstreɪ-)
n, pl -strata (-ˈstrɑːtə; -ˈstreɪtə)
1. any layer or stratum lying underneath another
2. a basis or foundation; groundwork
3. (Biology) the nonliving material on which an animal or plant grows or lives
4. (Geological Science) geology
a. the solid rock underlying soils, gravels, etc; bedrock
b. the surface to which a fixed organism is attached
5. (Sociology) sociol any of several subdivisions or grades within a stratum
6. (Photography) photog a binding layer by which an emulsion is made to adhere to a glass or film base. Sometimes shortened to: sub
7. (Philosophy) philosophy substance considered as that in which attributes and accidents inhere
8. (Linguistics) linguistics the language of an indigenous population when replaced by the language of a conquering or colonizing population, esp as it influences the form of the dominant language or of any mixed languages arising from their contact. Compare superstratum2
[C17: from New Latin, from Latin substrātus strewn beneath, from substernere to spread under, from sub- + sternere to spread]
subˈstrative, subˈstratal adj

sub•stra•tum

(ˈsʌbˌstreɪ təm, -ˌstræt əm, sʌbˈstreɪ təm, -ˈstræt əm)

n., pl. -stra•ta (-ˌstreɪ tə, -ˌstræt ə, -ˈstreɪ tə, -ˈstræt ə) -stra•tums.
1. something that is spread or laid under something else; a stratum or layer lying under another.
2. something that underlies or serves as a basis or foundation.
3. the subsoil.
[1625–35; < New Latin; see sub-, stratum]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.substratum - a surface on which an organism grows or is attached; "the gardener talked about the proper substrate for acid-loving plants"
surface - the extended two-dimensional outer boundary of a three-dimensional object; "they skimmed over the surface of the water"; "a brush small enough to clean every dental surface"; "the sun has no distinct surface"
2.substratum - any stratum or layer lying underneath another
stratum - one of several parallel layers of material arranged one on top of another (such as a layer of tissue or cells in an organism or a layer of sedimentary rock)
3.substratum - an indigenous language that contributes features to the language of an invading people who impose their language on the indigenous population; "the Celtic languages of Britain are a substrate for English"
indigenous language - a language that originated in a specified place and was not brought to that place from elsewhere

substratum

noun
The lowest or supporting part or structure:
Translations

substratum

[ˈsʌbˈstrɑːtəm] N (substrata (pl)) [ˈsʌbˈstrɑːtə]sustrato m

substratum

n pl <substrata> → Substrat nt; (Geol) → Untergrund m; (Sociol) → Substratum nt

substratum

[sʌbˈstrɑːtəm] n (substrata (pl)) [sʌbˈstrɑːtə] (Geol) (fig) → sostrato

sub·stra·tum

n. sustrato, fundación, base en la que vive un organismo.
References in periodicals archive ?
ABSTRACT To examine the role of substratum concavity in determining oyster [Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin, 1791)] settlement success, laboratory settlement was examined on natural and artificial substrata of various concavities, defined by width-to-depth (W:D) ratio.
The aim was to investigate the degree of morphological variation in view of the diversity of habitats, settlement substrata, and modes of life found in the Cirripedia.
Considering the availability of the waste, most of the applications of the process are concentrated on the treatment of the lees and sewage sludge, leaving open the possibility of integrating the other substrata for brief periods of the year.
Their shadows following us underground, Deep into the substrata, the
The present study investigated five different strategies for germination, utilizing distinctive substrata like jute bag, separating funnel, muslin cloth, filter paper and aluminum foil followed by evaluation of percent germination, radicle size, weight gain, total phenols and antioxidant activity of eleven indigenous legumes.
were abundant on benthic substrata at El Frances, Punta Freedy, Bahia Tres Puntas, and Sal si Puedes (Fig.
All species were found primarily associated with two of the possible substrata types, sand and vegetation (p<0.
It is proposed to rip the topsoil from the existing field, then cut and fill the substrata to reduce the overall fall to the site eliminating any depressions and/or high points and reinstate the topsoil to a gradual, even slope and re- establish the grass finish.
Specifically, this is done through the provision of artificial spawning substrata for the commercially valuable fish pike-perch in Parnu Bay.
Grooved titanium substrata altered fibronectin gene expression, mRNA stability, secretion, and assembly in fibroblasts [4, 22].