substratum


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sub·stra·tum

(sŭb′strā′təm, -străt′əm)
n. pl. sub·stra·ta (-strā′tə, -străt′ə) or sub·stra·tums
1.
a. An underlying layer.
b. A layer of earth beneath the surface soil; subsoil.
2. A foundation or groundwork.
3. The material on which another material is coated or fabricated.
4. Philosophy The underlying characterless substance that supports attributes of material reality.
5. Biology A substrate.
6. Linguistics A substrate.

[New Latin substrātum, from neuter of Latin substrātus, past participle of substernere, to lay under : sub-, sub- + sternere, to stretch, spread; see ster-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

sub·stra′tive adj.

substratum

(sʌbˈstrɑːtəm; -ˈstreɪ-)
n, pl -strata (-ˈstrɑːtə; -ˈstreɪtə)
1. any layer or stratum lying underneath another
2. a basis or foundation; groundwork
3. (Biology) the nonliving material on which an animal or plant grows or lives
4. (Geological Science) geology
a. the solid rock underlying soils, gravels, etc; bedrock
b. the surface to which a fixed organism is attached
5. (Sociology) sociol any of several subdivisions or grades within a stratum
6. (Photography) photog a binding layer by which an emulsion is made to adhere to a glass or film base. Sometimes shortened to: sub
7. (Philosophy) philosophy substance considered as that in which attributes and accidents inhere
8. (Linguistics) linguistics the language of an indigenous population when replaced by the language of a conquering or colonizing population, esp as it influences the form of the dominant language or of any mixed languages arising from their contact. Compare superstratum2
[C17: from New Latin, from Latin substrātus strewn beneath, from substernere to spread under, from sub- + sternere to spread]
subˈstrative, subˈstratal adj

sub•stra•tum

(ˈsʌbˌstreɪ təm, -ˌstræt əm, sʌbˈstreɪ təm, -ˈstræt əm)

n., pl. -stra•ta (-ˌstreɪ tə, -ˌstræt ə, -ˈstreɪ tə, -ˈstræt ə) -stra•tums.
1. something that is spread or laid under something else; a stratum or layer lying under another.
2. something that underlies or serves as a basis or foundation.
3. the subsoil.
[1625–35; < New Latin; see sub-, stratum]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.substratum - a surface on which an organism grows or is attached; "the gardener talked about the proper substrate for acid-loving plants"
surface - the extended two-dimensional outer boundary of a three-dimensional object; "they skimmed over the surface of the water"; "a brush small enough to clean every dental surface"; "the sun has no distinct surface"
2.substratum - any stratum or layer lying underneath another
stratum - one of several parallel layers of material arranged one on top of another (such as a layer of tissue or cells in an organism or a layer of sedimentary rock)
3.substratum - an indigenous language that contributes features to the language of an invading people who impose their language on the indigenous population; "the Celtic languages of Britain are a substrate for English"
indigenous language - a language that originated in a specified place and was not brought to that place from elsewhere

substratum

noun
The lowest or supporting part or structure:
Translations

substratum

[ˈsʌbˈstrɑːtəm] N (substrata (pl)) [ˈsʌbˈstrɑːtə]sustrato m

substratum

n pl <substrata> → Substrat nt; (Geol) → Untergrund m; (Sociol) → Substratum nt

substratum

[sʌbˈstrɑːtəm] n (substrata (pl)) [sʌbˈstrɑːtə] (Geol) (fig) → sostrato

sub·stra·tum

n. sustrato, fundación, base en la que vive un organismo.
References in classic literature ?
So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, lumbering up Shooter's Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass.
Without the body the brain would, of course, become a mere selfish intelligence, without any of the emotional substratum of the human being.
That would depend upon whether the germs of staunch comradeship underlay the temporary emotion, or whether it were a sensuous joy in her form only, with no substratum of everlastingness.
Firmly narrowing upward from this wealthy but inconspicuous substratum was the compact and dominant group which the Mingotts, Newlands, Chiverses and Mansons so actively represented.
The frozen substratum does not of itself destroy vegetation, for forests flourish on the surface, at a distance from the coast.
Thackeray steadily refuses to falsify life as he sees it in the interest of any deliberate theory, but he is too genuine an artist not to be true to the moral principles which form so large a part of the substratum of all life.
The purpose of Douglas Gray's book, Simple Forms, is 'simply to remind students of medieval literature that underneath the written texts that they read there lies a vast substratum of oral literature which has now disappeared, leaving only traces' (p.
To provide BSCs with the practical knowledge, training, and products to be a Walkway Safety Professional (WSP) Substratum Group has launched a 5-day course based on the Cycle of Walkway Management[TM] (design, plan, build, maintain, insure) developed by Substratum and incorporates the comprehensive walkway safety product line developed by SlipDoctors.
The Santo Domingo Hotel held the record for having the biggest vertical garden in the world, but unlike most of these gardens ours is substratum based, not hydroponic, making it, along with its 20-metre-high waterfall, the nearest modern equivalent to the famous Hanging Gardens of Babylon.
In the dry season, the pools completely dry out and the fishes die, but the eggs resist desiccation and remain in the substratum during the dry period.
He used compressed paper to provide substratum to the pages.
2] based coating tested in this research was not designed to defend from microbial growth from 'within' the concrete, effectively a living substratum, observed in figure 7.