substruction

sub·struc·tion

 (sŭb-strŭk′shən)
n.
A foundation; a substructure.

[Latin substrūctiō, substrūctiōn-, from substrūctus, past participle of substruere, to build beneath : sub-, sub- + struere, to build, pile up; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·struc′tion·al adj.

substruction

(sʌbˈstrʌkʃən)
n
(Building) the act or process of substructing
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the study of genetic way of humanity society and study of circumstance of commutation and changing speed on each of than we should consider cultural Substruction Among believes faiths and social tradition of that society as the main factor and motive of set of changing which has been noteworthly because without any cognition of the impact of mental main factors it would be impossible to define or explain objective factors of alteration development or its inaction and ineritia on past or now in a society.
The 100-meter long Nysa Bridge, a tunnel-like substruction, was the second largest of its kind in antiquity.
To operate constructs in the LRE-EWD model, theoretical substruction is applied to ensure the congruence between theoretical and operational systems in model testing.
Complicated research terms such as regression, theoretical substruction, triangulation, and multi-casuality are common subjects during casual conversations among experienced researchers, but for novice researchers, they can be intimidating.
Beginning researchers, including nursing students, will find it useful as a model and will find the use of elements of substruction compelling fur seeing connections between theory and methodology.
Minez ces substructions, quand l'obscurite en offense la perspective, non--alignez-y des lampions pour voir: il s'agit que vos pensees exigent le sol un simulacre.