subtext

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Related to subtexts: subtextual, context

sub·text

 (sŭb′tĕkst′)
n.
1. An implicit meaning or theme of a literary text.
2. The underlying personality of a dramatic character as implied or indicated by a script or text and interpreted by an actor in performance.

sub·tex·tu·al (-tĕks′cho͞o-əl) adj.

subtext

(ˈsʌbˌtɛkst)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an underlying theme in a piece of writing
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a message which is not stated directly but can be inferred

sub•text

(ˈsʌbˌtɛkst)

n.
the underlying or implicit meaning, as of a literary work.
[1945–50; translation of Russian podtékst]
Translations

subtext

[ˈsʌbtekst] Nsubtexto m

subtext

[ˈsʌbtɛkst] nsujet m sous-jacent

subtext

n the subtextdas eigentlich Gemeinte
References in periodicals archive ?
examines the forgotten subjects and the subject forgotten about the internment, why the act of silencing continues, memories and subtexts, gendering the subject of the internment, economics, subtexts lost and remembered, handing down memory, and continuing to remember everything that is white as sacred.
In a nutshell: Affable if standard-issue overview with kind of an anti-``MST3K'' approach: Commentators exult profound subtexts rather than goof on cheesiness.
This morsel of information points to the provocative subtexts and symbiotic relationships in images created with impressive sleight of hand.
No messages and no subtexts here; Resurrection is as sweet on the palate as a malted-milk ball--and melts away just as quickly.
It is within his genre category that he also notes the subtexts that underlie either the work in general or scenes or speeches in particular.
Subtexts include the role of religion; the fallacies of science and medicine; and gender and caste equity, (KLIATT's review of the abridged version of this title appeared in Nov.
Equating Rudolph Fisher's short stories and detective novel with Gurdjieff's "teaching stories," Woodson moves from decoding the esoteric subtexts to broader claims for the movement in Harlem: "Although it is clear that the narrative level of The Walls of Jericho presented a case against race and color discrimination, without Fisher's ciphered message, the reader would remain unaware of the African-American Gurdjieffians who were organizing to change the structure of American culture.
And your respect increases for Grant, a veteran actor who knows what a rare pleasure it is to encounter characters with subtexts and individual lives where you usually find cheap references to consumer-culture cliches.
Considering the dramatic influx of homosexual themes in modern television, it should come as no surprise that there might appear gay subtexts in a few TV shows -- even shows designed for children.
To demonstrate his thesis, Said explores the subtexts of great Nineteenth Century English, French, and American literature, taking the reader on a journey between the lines of Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, Andre Gide, and a host of other writers whose work students either enjoyed or fought their way through in high school and college.
of Economics and Business Administration, Austria) explores organizational texts in terms of their gendered subtexts, aiming to describe the notions and patterns by which males and females are (re)produced within organizational texts and how this gender subtext influences and changes organizational discourse and contributes to the development of a new field or space for organization research.
Yet as much as manner, artifice and gesture become subtexts, if not themes, the works are also informed by a sensitivity born of observation.