suburbanism


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suburbanism

(səˈbɜːbənɪzəm)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) any trait of suburbia
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) suburban traits collectively

suburbanism

the doctrines and conduct of those who regard life in suburbia superior to life in cities or country.
See also: Attitudes
the views of those who prefer to live in suburbs. — suburbanist, n., adj.
See also: Cities
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gans H (2005) Urbanism and suburbanism as ways of life: A reevaluation of definitions.
212) This phenomenon, in which landowners acquire adjacent vacant lots for use as a side yard for gardens, play areas, or open space, is known as blotting and the "New Suburbanism," because it lowers density to suburban or even rural levels.
If Bloom represents not only openness and idealism but also a dynamic combination of Evans Smith's bourgeois suburbanism and Rabate's anarchic radicalism, then it may be that he comes to resemble the very antithesis of the cliche of Utopianism.
But the current practice of mandatory suburbanism across the vast majority of every metropolitan area is absurd.
The history of the British colonies, the effects on society of urbanism and suburbanism, issues of identity, and attitudes towards the colonies, immigrants, and the suburbs are interwoven themes through Kuchta's analysis, leading the reader to a fresh understanding of British notions of place as symbols of power and values through their complex associations with imperialism and colonialism.
Perhaps more striking yet is the note of suburbanism that enters the anthology near its midpoint.
Bill Moshofsky - vice president of Oregonians in Action, the advocates for creeping suburbanism - is wrong three times in his Sept.
The demand for 'walkable urbanity' is surpassing demand for 'drivable suburbanism,'" Chris Leinberger, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, told urban planners at the fall national meeting of the Urban Land Institute held in Denver in October.
In his research for "The New Suburbanism," a paper on emerging suburban trends, Kotkin has heard "downshifting boomers" say they want to stay in the burbs, but they're craving neighborhoods that are "funky but safe.
Organized by the Zacheta's Magda Kardasz and expat New Zealander Simon Rees (now curator at the Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius), this binational survey features an even spread of early- to midcareer artists mining three thematic categories: indigeneity and local mythology, suburbanism (the human hatchery is a recurrent concern in art from the region), and a placeless internationalism.
The final chapter shows that this new suburbanism can be fun as well as profitable, with a little help from municipalities and experts, and a good dose of citizen participation and resourcefulness.
I want VW to be known as a brand that is against beige-ism, suburbanism and vanilla-ism," says Hunt.