succour


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suc·cour

 (sŭk′ər)
n. & v. Chiefly British
Variant of succor.

succour

(ˈsʌkə) or

succor

n
1. help or assistance, esp in time of difficulty
2. a person or thing that provides help
vb
(tr) to give aid to
[C13: from Old French sucurir, from Latin succurrere to hurry to help, from sub- under + currere to run]
ˈsuccourable, ˈsuccorable adj
ˈsuccourer, ˈsuccorer n
ˈsuccourless, ˈsuccorless adj

Succour

 ships collectively.
Example: succour of galleys.

succour


Past participle: succoured
Gerund: succouring

Imperative
succour
succour
Present
I succour
you succour
he/she/it succours
we succour
you succour
they succour
Preterite
I succoured
you succoured
he/she/it succoured
we succoured
you succoured
they succoured
Present Continuous
I am succouring
you are succouring
he/she/it is succouring
we are succouring
you are succouring
they are succouring
Present Perfect
I have succoured
you have succoured
he/she/it has succoured
we have succoured
you have succoured
they have succoured
Past Continuous
I was succouring
you were succouring
he/she/it was succouring
we were succouring
you were succouring
they were succouring
Past Perfect
I had succoured
you had succoured
he/she/it had succoured
we had succoured
you had succoured
they had succoured
Future
I will succour
you will succour
he/she/it will succour
we will succour
you will succour
they will succour
Future Perfect
I will have succoured
you will have succoured
he/she/it will have succoured
we will have succoured
you will have succoured
they will have succoured
Future Continuous
I will be succouring
you will be succouring
he/she/it will be succouring
we will be succouring
you will be succouring
they will be succouring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been succouring
you have been succouring
he/she/it has been succouring
we have been succouring
you have been succouring
they have been succouring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been succouring
you will have been succouring
he/she/it will have been succouring
we will have been succouring
you will have been succouring
they will have been succouring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been succouring
you had been succouring
he/she/it had been succouring
we had been succouring
you had been succouring
they had been succouring
Conditional
I would succour
you would succour
he/she/it would succour
we would succour
you would succour
they would succour
Past Conditional
I would have succoured
you would have succoured
he/she/it would have succoured
we would have succoured
you would have succoured
they would have succoured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.succour - assistance in time of difficultysuccour - assistance in time of difficulty; "the contributions provided some relief for the victims"
assist, assistance, help, aid - the activity of contributing to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose; "he gave me an assist with the housework"; "could not walk without assistance"; "rescue party went to their aid"; "offered his help in unloading"
consolation, solace, comfort - the act of consoling; giving relief in affliction; "his presence was a consolation to her"
mercy - alleviation of distress; showing great kindness toward the distressed; "distributing food and clothing to the flood victims was an act of mercy"
Verb1.succour - help in a difficult situation
aid, assist, help - give help or assistance; be of service; "Everyone helped out during the earthquake"; "Can you help me carry this table?"; "She never helps around the house"

succour

noun
1. help, support, aid, relief, comfort, assistance Have you offered comfort and succour to your friend?
verb
1. help, support, aid, encourage, nurse, comfort, foster, assist, relieve, minister to, befriend, render assistance to, give aid and encouragement to They had left nothing to succour a dung beetle, let alone a human.
Translations

succour

succor (US) [ˈsʌkəʳ] (frm)
A. Nsocorro m
B. VTsocorrer

succour

, (US) succor (liter)
nBeistand m
vtbeistehen (+dat)

succour

succor (Am) [ˈsʌkəʳ] (frm, liter)
1. nsoccorso
to provide succo(u)r to → prestare soccorso a
2. vtsoccorrere, aiutare
References in classic literature ?
The poor, as we have already said, whom she sought out to be the objects of her bounty, often reviled the hand that was stretched forth to succour them.
She continued by the side of her sister, with little intermission the whole afternoon, calming every fear, satisfying every inquiry of her enfeebled spirits, supplying every succour, and watching almost every look and every breath.
And if you are inclined to despise the day of small things, seek some more efficient succour than such as I can offer.
Earnshaw soon convinced him that he was alive still; Joseph hastened to administer a dose of spirits, and by their succour his master presently regained motion and consciousness.
For the love of Heaven, of justice, of generosity, of the honour of your noble name, I supplicate you, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, to succour and release me.
Hope elevates, and joy Bright'ns his Crest, as when a wandring Fire Compact of unctuous vapor, which the Night Condenses, and the cold invirons round, Kindl'd through agitation to a Flame, Which oft, they say, some evil Spirit attends, Hovering and blazing with delusive Light, Misleads th' amaz'd Night-wanderer from his way To Boggs and Mires, & oft through Pond or Poole, There swallow'd up and lost, from succour farr.
Besides, what succour couldst thou have from me, a peaceful Pilgrim, against two armed heathens?
I obeyed the influence, and discovered it to proceed from the mercy of God to three young children who were destitute of all succour, and at the point of death.
For in those plains and deserts where they engaged in combat and came out wounded, it was not always that there was some one to cure them, unless indeed they had for a friend some sage magician to succour them at once by fetching through the air upon a cloud some damsel or dwarf with a vial of water of such virtue that by tasting one drop of it they were cured of their hurts and wounds in an instant and left as sound as if they had not received any damage whatever.
The flag was run up at half-mast, and, this being the signal of distress, it was hoped that the American steamer, perceiving it, would change her course a little, so as to succour the pilot-boat.
The night will soon fall; this forest is most wild and lonely; strange noises are often heard therein after sunset; wolves haunt these glades, and Danish warriors infest the country; worse things are talked of; you might chance to hear, as it were, a child cry, and on opening the door to afford it succour, a greet black bull, or a shadowy goblin dog, might rush over the threshold; or, more awful still, if something flapped, as with wings, against the lattice, and then a raven or a white dove flew in and settled on the hearth, such a visitor would be a sure sign of misfortune to the house; therefore, heed my advice, and lift the latchet for nothing.
Go, then, to him, remind him of all this, clasp his knees, and bid him give succour to the Trojans.