succulent


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suc·cu·lent

 (sŭk′yə-lənt)
adj.
1. Full of juice or sap; juicy.
2. Botany Having thick, fleshy, water-storing leaves or stems.
3. Highly interesting or enjoyable; delectable: a succulent bit of gossip.
n. Botany
A succulent plant, such as a sedum or cactus.

[Latin succulentus, from succus, juice; see seuə- in Indo-European roots.]

suc′cu·lence, suc′cu·len·cy n.
suc′cu·lent·ly adv.

succulent

(ˈsʌkjʊlənt)
adj
1. (Cookery) abundant in juices; juicy
2. (Botany) (of plants) having thick fleshy leaves or stems
3. informal stimulating interest, desire, etc
n
(Botany) a plant that is able to exist in arid or salty conditions by using water stored in its fleshy tissues
[C17: from Latin succulentus, from sūcus juice]
ˈsucculence, ˈsucculency n
ˈsucculently adv

suc•cu•lent

(ˈsʌk yə lənt)

adj.
1. full of juice; juicy.
2. rich in desirable qualities.
3. affording mental nourishment.
4. (of a plant) having fleshy and juicy tissues.
n.
5. a succulent plant, as a sedum or cactus.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin sūculentus= Latin sūc(us), succus juice + -ulentus -ulent]
suc′cu•lence, suc′cu•len•cy, n.
suc′cu•lent•ly, adv.

suc·cu·lent

(sŭk′yə-lənt)
A plant having fleshy leaves or stems that store water. Cacti are succulents.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.succulent - a plant adapted to arid conditions and characterized by fleshy water-storing tissues that act as water reservoirssucculent - a plant adapted to arid conditions and characterized by fleshy water-storing tissues that act as water reservoirs
Carpobrotus edulis, Hottentot fig, Hottentot's fig, Mesembryanthemum edule, sour fig - low-growing South African succulent plant having a capsular fruit containing edible pulp
Dorotheanthus bellidiformis, livingstone daisy - low-growing showy succulent annual of South Africa having white or pink or red or orange flowers and spatulate leaves covered in papillae that resemble small crystals
flowering stone, lithops, living stone, stone life face, stone plant, stoneface, stone-face - any plant of the genus Lithops native to Africa having solitary yellow or white flowers and thick leaves that resemble stones
living granite, stone mimicry plant, living rock - highly succulent stemless clump-forming plants with grey-green leaves similar in texture to lumps of granite; South Africa
cactus - any succulent plant of the family Cactaceae native chiefly to arid regions of the New World and usually having spines
aloe - succulent plants having rosettes of leaves usually with fiber like hemp and spikes of showy flowers; found chiefly in Africa
tracheophyte, vascular plant - green plant having a vascular system: ferns, gymnosperms, angiosperms
Adj.1.succulent - full of juice; "lush fruits"; "succulent roast beef"; "succulent plants with thick fleshy leaves"
juicy - full of juice

succulent

adjective juicy, moist, luscious, rich, lush, mellow, mouthwatering succulent early vegetables
Translations
عُصاري، كثير العُصارَهغَض، رَيّان، طرينَبات أو ثَمَرَةُ كَثيرة العُصارَه
šťavnatýsukulentsukulentní
saftplantesukkulent
nedvdúspozsgás növény
òykkblöîungursafamikillsafaríkur, ljúffengur
sukulentas
gaļīgssukulentssulīgs
sukulentsukulentný
kalın ve etlikalın yaprak ve sapı olan bitkisulu ve lezzetli

succulent

[ˈsʌkjʊlənt]
A. ADJ
1. [meat, fruit, vegetable] → suculento
2. (Bot) [plant, leaves] → carnoso
B. N (Bot) → planta f carnosa

succulent

[ˈsʌkjʊlənt]
adjsucculent(e)
n (BOTANY)plante f grasse

succulent

adj peach, steaksaftig; (Bot) plant, stemfleischig, sukkulent (spec)
n (Bot) → Fettpflanze f, → Sukkulente f (spec)

succulent

[ˈsʌkjʊlənt]
1. adj (tasty) → succulento/a
2. n (Bot) succulentspiante fpl grasse

succulent

(ˈsakjulənt) adjective
1. (of fruit or other food eg meat) juicy and delicious. a succulent peach.
2. (of plants) having thick stems and leaves that are full of moisture.
noun
a plant of this type. A cactus is a type of succulent.
ˈsucculence noun
References in classic literature ?
Ah," thought Akut, "The Killer has taken a mate," and so, obedient to the tribal laws of his kind, he left them alone, becoming suddenly absorbed in a fuzzy caterpillar of peculiarly succulent appearance.
When I have mixed this honey with the paste of the bread-fruit," said he, "I shall be able to offer you a succulent cake.
When he breakfasted or dined all the resources of the club--its kitchens and pantries, its buttery and dairy--aided to crowd his table with their most succulent stores; he was served by the gravest waiters, in dress coats, and shoes with swan-skin soles, who proffered the viands in special porcelain, and on the finest linen; club decanters, of a lost mould, contained his sherry, his port, and his cinnamon-spiced claret; while his beverages were refreshingly cooled with ice, brought at great cost from the American lakes.
I ran over the white space and down a steep slope, through a scattered growth of trees, and came to a low-lying stretch of tall reeds, through which I pushed into a dark, thick undergrowth that black and succulent under foot.
I could feel the succulent giving of flesh and bone under my blows, and for a moment I was free.
Those that would stand still of their own will were milked in the middle of the yard, where many of such better behaved ones stood waiting now--all prime milchers, such as were seldom seen out of this valley, and not always within it; nourished by the succulent feed which the water-meads supplied at this prime season of the year.
And as I looked there came bobbing out upon the current from the Stygian darkness of the interior the shell of one of the great, succulent fruits of the sorapus tree.
It was a dinner for a King when he brought in a huge dish of it, succulent with tomatoes, and we ate it together with the good household bread and a bottle of red wine.
Kala had moved slowly along an elephant track toward the east, and was busily engaged in turning over rotted limbs and logs in search of succulent bugs and fungi, when the faintest shadow of a strange noise brought her to startled attention.
Chulk was, at first, for rushing rapidly ahead as though the village of the raiders lay but an hour's march before them instead of several days; but within a few minutes a fallen tree attracted his attention with its suggestion of rich and succulent forage beneath, and when Tarzan, missing him, returned in search, he found Chulk squatting beside the rotting bole, from beneath which he was assiduously engaged in digging out the grubs and beetles, whose kind form a considerable proportion of the diet of the apes.
The ape-man had no knife, but nature had equipped him with the means of tearing his food from the quivering flank of his prey, and gleaming teeth sank into the succulent flesh while the raging lion looked on from below as another enjoyed the dinner that he had thought already his.
Food was plentiful, principally berries and succulent roots, and on the river bank we played and lingered for days.