suck


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Related to suck: sock, sack

suck

 (sŭk)
v. sucked, suck·ing, sucks
v.tr.
1.
a. To draw (liquid) into the mouth by movements of the tongue and lips that create suction.
b. To draw a liquid into the mouth through or from: a baby sucking a bottle.
c. To hold, moisten, or maneuver (a sweet, for example) in the mouth, especially in creating suction.
2.
a. To draw in by establishing a partial vacuum: a cleaning device that sucks up dirt; sucked air into his lungs.
b. To draw in a current in a fluid: debris that got sucked into the drain.
c. To cause to be involved or engaged in something: teenagers who are sucked into a life of crime.
3. Vulgar Slang To perform fellatio on.
v.intr.
1. To move the tongue and lips to create suction: sucked on a straw.
2. To draw something in by suction: The pump started to suck.
3. To draw nourishment from a breast or teat; suckle.
4. To make a sound caused by suction.
5. Slang
a. To be highly unpleasant or disagreeable: This job sucks.
b. To be of poor or inferior quality: The acting in that movie sucked.
c. To be inept: I suck at math.
n.
1. The act or sound of sucking: gave the straw a suck.
2. Suction.
Phrasal Verbs:
suck in
To take advantage of; cheat; swindle: We really got sucked in by that offer.
suck up Slang
To behave obsequiously; fawn: sucking up to their rich relations.
Idiom:
suck it up
Slang To accept and deal with something one finds unpleasant.

[Middle English suken, from Old English sūcan; see seuə- in Indo-European roots.]

suck

(sʌk)
vb
1. (Physiology) to draw (a liquid or other substance) into the mouth by creating a partial vacuum in the mouth
2. to draw in (fluid, etc) by or as if by a similar action: plants suck moisture from the soil.
3. (Physiology) to drink milk from (a mother's breast); suckle
4. (Physiology) (tr) to extract fluid content from (a solid food): to suck a lemon.
5. (Physiology) (tr) to take into the mouth and moisten, dissolve, or roll around with the tongue: to suck one's thumb.
6. (tr; often foll by down, in, etc) to draw by using irresistible force: the whirlpool sucked him down.
7. (Mechanical Engineering) (intr) (of a pump) to draw in air because of a low supply level or leaking valves, pipes, etc
8. (tr) to assimilate or acquire (knowledge, comfort, etc)
9. (intr) slang to be contemptible or disgusting
10. sucking diesel informal doing very well; successful
11. suck it and see informal to try something to find out what it is, what it is like, or how it works
n
12. the act or an instance of sucking
13. something that is sucked, esp milk from the mother's breast
14. (Physiology) give suck to to give (a baby or young animal) milk from the breast or udder
15. an attracting or sucking force: the suck of the whirlpool was very strong.
16. a sound caused by sucking
[Old English sūcan; related to Old Norse súga, Middle Dutch sūgen, Latin sūgere to suck, exhaust; see soak]
ˈsuckless adj

suck

(sʌk)

v.t.
1. to draw into the mouth by producing a partial vacuum by action of the lips and tongue: to suck lemonade through a straw.
2. to draw (water, moisture, air, etc.) by or as if by suction.
3. to apply the lips or mouth to and draw the liquid from: to suck an orange.
4. to put into the mouth and draw upon: to suck one's thumb.
5. to take into the mouth and dissolve by the action of the tongue, saliva, etc.: to suck a piece of candy.
6. to bring to a specified condition by sucking.
v.i.
7. to draw something in by producing a partial vacuum in the mouth, esp. to draw milk from the breast.
8. to draw or be drawn by or as if by suction.
9. (of a pump) to draw air instead of water, as when the water is low or a valve is defective.
10. Slang. to behave in a fawning manner (usu. fol. by around).
11. Slang. to be repellent or disgusting.
12. suck in, Informal. to deceive; cheat; defraud.
13. suck up, Slang. to be obsequious; toady.
n.
14. an act or instance of sucking.
15. a sucking force.
16. the sound produced by sucking.
17. that which is sucked.
18. a small drink; sip.
[before 900; (v.) Middle English souken, Old English sūcan, c. Latin sūgere; akin to Old English, Old High German sūgan, Old Saxon sūgen, Old Norse sūga]

suck


Past participle: sucked
Gerund: sucking

Imperative
suck
suck
Present
I suck
you suck
he/she/it sucks
we suck
you suck
they suck
Preterite
I sucked
you sucked
he/she/it sucked
we sucked
you sucked
they sucked
Present Continuous
I am sucking
you are sucking
he/she/it is sucking
we are sucking
you are sucking
they are sucking
Present Perfect
I have sucked
you have sucked
he/she/it has sucked
we have sucked
you have sucked
they have sucked
Past Continuous
I was sucking
you were sucking
he/she/it was sucking
we were sucking
you were sucking
they were sucking
Past Perfect
I had sucked
you had sucked
he/she/it had sucked
we had sucked
you had sucked
they had sucked
Future
I will suck
you will suck
he/she/it will suck
we will suck
you will suck
they will suck
Future Perfect
I will have sucked
you will have sucked
he/she/it will have sucked
we will have sucked
you will have sucked
they will have sucked
Future Continuous
I will be sucking
you will be sucking
he/she/it will be sucking
we will be sucking
you will be sucking
they will be sucking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sucking
you have been sucking
he/she/it has been sucking
we have been sucking
you have been sucking
they have been sucking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sucking
you will have been sucking
he/she/it will have been sucking
we will have been sucking
you will have been sucking
they will have been sucking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sucking
you had been sucking
he/she/it had been sucking
we had been sucking
you had been sucking
they had been sucking
Conditional
I would suck
you would suck
he/she/it would suck
we would suck
you would suck
they would suck
Past Conditional
I would have sucked
you would have sucked
he/she/it would have sucked
we would have sucked
you would have sucked
they would have sucked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suck - the act of suckingsuck - the act of sucking      
consumption, ingestion, intake, uptake - the process of taking food into the body through the mouth (as by eating)
Verb1.suck - draw into the mouth by creating a practical vacuum in the mouth; "suck the poison from the place where the snake bit"; "suck on a straw"; "the baby sucked on the mother's breast"
drink, imbibe - take in liquids; "The patient must drink several liters each day"; "The children like to drink soda"
breastfeed, give suck, lactate, wet-nurse, suckle, nurse, suck - give suck to; "The wetnurse suckled the infant"; "You cannot nurse your baby in public in some places"
suck in, sop up, take up, take in - take up as if with a sponge
2.suck - draw something in by or as if by a vacuum; "Mud was sucking at her feet"
draw, take out - take liquid out of a container or well; "She drew water from the barrel"
3.suck - attract by using an inexorable force, inducement, etc.; "The current boom in the economy sucked many workers in from abroad"
take in, absorb - suck or take up or in; "A black star absorbs all matter"
4.suck - be inadequate or objectionable; "this sucks!"
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"
5.suck - provide sexual gratification through oral stimulation
excite, stir, stimulate - stir feelings in; "stimulate my appetite"; "excite the audience"; "stir emotions"
6.suck - take in, also metaphoricallysuck - take in, also metaphorically; "The sponge absorbs water well"; "She drew strength from the minister's words"
mop, mop up, wipe up - to wash or wipe with or as if with a mop; "Mop the hallway now"; "He mopped her forehead with a towel"
blot - dry (ink) with blotting paper
sponge up - absorb as if with a sponge; "sponge up the spilled milk on the counter"
suck in, draw in - draw in as if by suction; "suck in your cheeks and stomach"
7.suck - give suck to; "The wetnurse suckled the infant"; "You cannot nurse your baby in public in some places"
suck - draw into the mouth by creating a practical vacuum in the mouth; "suck the poison from the place where the snake bit"; "suck on a straw"; "the baby sucked on the mother's breast"
feed, give - give food to; "Feed the starving children in India"; "don't give the child this tough meat"

suck

verb
1. drink, sip, draw, sup, siphon, quaff, slurp They waited in silence and sucked their drinks through straws.
2. take, draw, pull, extract The air is sucked out by a high-powered fan.
3. (Informal) be very bad, be terrible, be awful, be dreadful, be foul, be very unpleasant The system sucks.
suck someone in or into something involve in, mix up in, draw into, implicate in the extent to which they have been sucked into a cycle of violence
suck up to someone (Informal) ingratiate yourself with, play up to (informal), curry favour with, flatter, pander to, toady, butter up, kiss someone's ass (U.S. & Canad. taboo slang), brown-nose (taboo slang), keep in with (informal), fawn on, truckle, lick someone's boots, dance attendance on, get on the right side of, worm yourself into (someone's) favour She kept sucking up to the teachers.

suck

verb
To draw in so that extrication is difficult:
phrasal verb
suck up
Slang. To support slavishly every opinion or suggestion of a superior:
Idioms: curry favor, dance attendance, kiss someone's feet, lick someone's boots.
Translations
مُخيف، فَظيعمصمَص، إمْتِصاصيَرْضَعيَمْتَص، يَشْفُط
духамсмуча
sátsmrdětvysátzavánět podrazemcucat
suttesugesut
imeähaista
sisati
ócskaszopásszopikszopogat
sjúgasog; tottsoga, sjúga
吸う
입으로 빨다
fellare
čiulpikasčiulpimasčiulptipadlaižiautisiurbikas
but pretigamiesūktriebtiessūkāšanasūkāt
suge
nudiťsaťunavovať
sesati
suga
ดูด
emmekiçine çekmekbir boka benzememekemme
mút

suck

[sʌk]
A. VT [person] → sorber; [machine] → aspirar
to suck one's thumb/fingerschuparse el dedo/los dedos
we were sucked into the controversynos vimos envueltos en la polémica
to suck sb dry (of sth)exprimir (algo) a algn
to suck it and see (Brit) → probar a ver
B. VI
1. (gen) → chupar; [baby] (at breast) → mamar
to suck on/at sthchupar algo
to suck at one's mother's breastmamar del pecho de su madre
2. (esp US) this suckses una mierda
suck down VT + ADV [current, mud] → tragar
suck in VT + ADV
1. (lit)
1.1. [machine] [+ dust, air] → aspirar
1.2. [black hole] [+ matter] → tragar, aspirar
1.3. [person] [+ air] → tomar
he heard her suck in her breath sharplyle oyó aspirar sobresaltada
to suck one's cheeks inhundir los carrillos
to suck one's stomach inmeter el estómago
2. (fig) to get sucked in (to war, argument) → verse envuelto
suck off VT + ADV (sexually) → mamar
suck up
A. VT + ADV [+ dust, liquid] → aspirar
B. VI + ADV to suck up to sbdar coba a algn

suck

[ˈsʌk]
vt
[+ sweet, pencil] → sucer; [baby] [+ breast, bottle] → téter
to suck one's thumb → sucer son pouce
(= take liquid into mouth) [+ juice, poison] → sucer
He sucked the juice from the orange → Il suça le jus de l'orange.
(= draw in) [pump, machine] [+ liquid, air] → aspirer
The water is sucked upwards through the pipe → L'eau est aspirée vers le haut par le tuyau.
(= pull with force) → aspirer
The pilot was almost sucked from the cockpit when a window shattered → Le pilote a presque été aspiré du cockpit lorsqu'un hublot s'est brisé.
vi
to suck at sth [+ bottle] → téter qch; [+ orange] → sucer qch
to suck on sth [+ sweet] → sucer qch; [+ cigarette, pipe] → tirer sur qch
(= be useless) [film, book, CD, system, situation, place] → craindre

suck

n to have a suck (at straw) → saugen, ziehen (→ at an +dat); (at lemonade etc) → nuckeln (inf), → ziehen (→ at an +dat); (at lollipop) → lutschen (→ at an +dat); to give suck (to a baby) (old)(ein Baby) stillen
vtsaugen; breast, strawsaugen an (+dat); sweet, pastillelutschen; lollipoplutschen an (+dat); thumblutschen or nuckeln (inf)an (+dat); to suck one’s teethan den Zähnen saugen; to suck the juice out of somethingden Saft aus etw heraussaugen; to suck somebody’s blood (lit)jdm das Blut aussaugen; (fig)jdn bis aufs Blut aussaugen; to suck somebody dry (fig)jdn bis aufs Blut aussaugen; go and teach your grandmother to suck eggs (prov) → da will das Ei wieder klüger sein als die Henne (prov); suck it and see (fig)Probieren geht über Studieren (Prov)
vi
(→ an +dat) → saugen; (at dummy) → nuckeln (inf); (at lollipop) → lutschen; (at thumb) → lutschen, nuckeln (inf); (at pipe, through straw) → ziehen; he always makes a sucking noise with his souper schlürft seine Suppe immer
(US inf: = be very bad) this city sucksdiese Stadt ist echt Scheiße (inf)

suck

[sʌk]
1. vt (gen) → succhiare; (subj, baby) → poppare, succhiare; (pump, machine) → aspirare
to suck one's thumb → succhiarsi il dito
to suck sth through a straw → bere qc con la cannuccia
to suck an orange dry → succhiare tutto il succo di un'arancia
to suck dry (fig) (person, of money) → ripulire (of energy) → esaurire
2. vi (baby) → succhiare, poppare
to suck at sth → succhiare qc
suck down vt + adv (subj, current, mud) → inghiottire, risucchiare
suck in vt + adv (subj, machine, dust, air) → aspirare
to suck one's cheeks in → succhiarsi le guance
suck out vt + advsucchiare, far uscire succhiando
suck up
1. vt + adv (dust, liquid) → aspirare
2. vi + adv (fam) to suck up to sbleccare i piedi a qn

suck

(sak) verb
1. to draw liquid etc into the mouth. As soon as they are born, young animals learn to suck (milk from their mothers); She sucked up the lemonade through a straw.
2. to hold something between the lips or inside the mouth, as though drawing liquid from it. I told him to take the sweet out of his mouth, but he just went on sucking; He sucked the end of his pencil.
3. to pull or draw in a particular direction with a sucking or similar action. The vacuum cleaner sucked up all the dirt from the carpet; A plant sucks up moisture from the soil.
4. (American) (slang) to be awful, boring, disgusting etc. Her singing sucks; This job sucks.
noun
an act of sucking. I gave him a suck of my lollipop.
ˈsucker noun
1. (slang) a person who is easily fooled or is stupid enough to do something. Who is the sucker who bought your car?
2. a person or thing that sucks. Are these insects bloodsuckers?
3. an organ on an animal, eg an octopus, by which it sticks to objects.
4. a curved pad or disc (of rubber etc) that can be pressed on to a surface and stick there.
5. a side shoot coming from the root of a plant.
suck up to
(slang) to do or say things to please one's boss etc for one's own benefit. They despise him because he's always sucking up to the boss.

suck

يَرْضَع sát sutte saugen ρουφώ chupar imeä sucer sisati succhiare 吸う 입으로 빨다 zuigen suge possać sugar сосать suga ดูด emmek mút 吮吸

suck

vt. chupar, [mother's milk] mamar;
to ___ outchupar sacando; vaciar, extraer.

suck

vt, vi chupar, (at mother's breast) mamar; to — one's thumb chuparse el dedo
References in classic literature ?
If she's mad with her, she eats one before her face, and doesn't offer even a suck.
A dull, sickly yellow began to obscure the sky, and the water, from a beautiful blue, turned a slate color and ran along the sides of the vessel with a hissing sound as though the sullen waves would ask nothing better than to suck the craft down into their depths.
Now, then, Pip, we'll talk this over; I do suck most wondrous philosophies from thee
And there was a bottle that had had milk in it, and it had a rag stopper for a baby to suck.
I dare you to knock it off -- and anybody that'll take a dare will suck eggs.
There now," and he pushed the rubber tip of the bottle into the nuzzling mouth and the lamb began to suck it with ravenous ecstasy.
Foulon who told my baby it might suck grass, when these breasts where dry with want
The nurse, to quiet her babe, made use of a rattle which was a kind of hollow vessel filled with great stones, and fastened by a cable to the child's waist: but all in vain; so that she was forced to apply the last remedy by giving it suck.
Only make yourself honey and the flies will suck you;' 'as much as thou hast so much art thou worth,' as my grandmother used to say; and 'thou canst have no revenge of a man of substance.
And then, in an embarrassed silence, all took their places; and even the paper - from which it was the old gentleman's habit to suck mortification daily, as he marked the decline of our institutions - even the paper lay furled by his side.
As I look round this room, although it has been to me so full of fear, it is now a sort of sanctuary, for nothing can be more dreadful than those awful women, who were, who are, waiting to suck my blood.
When she began to suck again, we could see the water all inside whirling round and round, and it made a deafening sound as it broke against the rocks.